UNIVERSITY OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND 2019-20 Academic Calendar

19 Undergraduate Academic Programs / Departments

Acadian Studies

Co-ordinator: Carlo Lavoie (Modern Languages)

The Minor in Acadian Studies aims to provide a better understanding of the place and importance of the French language and the Acadian community on Prince Edward Island and in Maritime Canada. The program consists of an immersion in general cultural subject areas and of an analysis of specific literary and cultural topics. The study of Acadian culture may pave the way to graduate school and/or education programs or simply be complement to one’s University study. On the one hand, UPEI’s Minor in Acadian Studies offers students the opportunity to develop both their analytical and the practical skills in French and will provide its students with the foundational skills with which they can pursue their interest in the practice of French. On the other hand, the Minor in Acadian Studies aims to link in a common thematic different courses offered in English which propose a reflection on the Acadian as part of a cultural and linguistic minority.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN ACADIAN STUDIES 

A Minor in Acadian Studies consists of twenty-one (21) semester hours of credit taken from the list of approved courses. The language requirements are French 2410 and French 2420 (both courses could be counted in the Minor in Acadian Studies if they are not counted for the Major in French). Acadian Studies 2010 plus three courses among Acadian Studies 4910/4920, Special Topics 2090, 3090, and 4090, and French 4430/4440, are compulsory for the Minor. Prospective students should note, however, that Acadian Studies 4910 and 4920 require students to make a significant contribution to the study of Acadie which will be approved by the Instructor. One of these four courses will, typically, be only offered in the Winter Term of the academic year. In addition, students must select three elective courses. Students using any of the approved courses to complete the Minor in Acadian Studies may not use them to complete a Major or another Minor.

REQUIREMENTS IN FRENCH
2410 FRENCH
2420 FRENCH

ACADIAN STUDIES CORE COURSES

2010 INTRODUCTION TO ACADIAN STUDIES
This course is designed to provide an opportunity to examine the development of Acadian culture through the oral tradition, songs and folk tales. The themes of colonialism, regionalism, folklore and oral traditions will provide the basis for this examination. The object of the course is to develop an awareness of the complex patterns of development in Acadian culture from the French period to the present. The course will consist of seminars and lectures conducted in French.
PREREQUISITES: French 2410 and French 2420 or the permission of the Coordinator of Acadian Studies
Three hours a week

2090 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Acadian Studies at the 2000 level.

3090 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Acadian Studies at the 3000 level.

4090 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Acadian Studies at the 4000 level.

4430 CULTURE ET LITTÉRATURE ACADIENNES I
(See French 4430)

4440 CULTURE ET LITTÉRATURE ACADIENNES II
(See French 4440)

4910/4920 DIRECTED STUDIES (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies)
The purpose of the course is to provide an opportunity for intensive interdisciplinary research in an area to be determined by the student and the coordinator of the program. Readings and research on the course will be supervised and the student is expected to present the results of the research in the form of an extended essay. This is a tutorial and seminar course.
PREREQUISITE: Acadian Studies 2010 or the permission of the Coordinator of Acadian Studies
Three hours a week

ELECTIVES

Note: Students who are enrolled in the Major in French and the Minor in Acadian Studies can take at least two electives outside the Department of Modern Languages.

CANADIAN STUDIES
3010/3020 The Canadian Experience

EDUCATION
2130 Introduction à l’éducation en français au Canada

ENGLISH
3310 The Literature of Atlantic Canada

HISTORY
2310/2320 The Atlantic Region
4240 History of Canadian Nationalism and the Canadian Identity

MODERN LANGUAGES (French)
2520 Le français des affaires
3390 Théâtre canadien-français

SOCIOLOGY & ANTHROPOLOGY
3120 Rural Society in Canada
4310 Minority/Ethnic Groups and Canadian Multiculturalism

DIVERSITY AND SOCIAL JUSTICE STUDIES
3110 Identity and Popular Culture

DIRECTED STUDIES

With the approval of the Coordinator, the Dean of Arts, and the relevant Department, a student may credit three hours of Directed Studies in any subject linked to Acadian Studies towards the Minor.

Applied Climate Change and Adaptation

Faculty:

Adam Fenech, Associate Professor
Xiuquan Wang, Assistant Professor

The UPEI Bachelor of Science in Applied Climate Change and Adaptation provides students with a strong foundation in climate sciences complemented by courses in climate related policy and cultural impacts of climate change. The program offers strong comprehensive theory-based courses and a high level of experiential and applied learning. Courses are designed to develop well-rounded students who have a high level of climate change science knowledge supported by highly relevant skills needed to utilize climate change related technology. Faculty members teaching within the Bachelor of Science in Applied Climate Change and Adaptation program are focused on providing quality instruction and student growth within a cohort-based learning community. Graduates of the program will emerge ready to pursue various climate change related careers, professional studies, or graduate education.

This program of study examines “climate change adaptation” which refers to the adjustments that societies or ecosystems make to limit the negative effects of climate change or to take advantage of opportunities provided by a changing climate. Adaptation can range from a farmer planting more drought-resistant crops to a coastal community evaluating how best to protect its infrastructure from rising sea level. Climate change is already impacting societies and ecosystems around the world, and many impacts are expected to increase as global temperatures continue to rise. While reducing greenhouse gas emissions is required to avoid the worst impacts of climate change, a certain amount of global warming is inevitable, due to the long-lasting nature of greenhouse gases already in the atmosphere, and to heat already stored in the oceans. Adapting to the changes that are already underway, and preparing for future climate change, can help reduce the risks societies will face from climate change.

REQUIREMENTS FOR APPLIED CLIMATE CHANGE AND ADAPTATION

Students following this degree program must complete 127 semester hours of required courses

REQUIRED COURSES FOR APPLIED CLIMATE CHANGE AND ADAPTATION

  • ACC 1010 Introduction to PEI’s Living Climate Lab
  • ACC 1020 Introduction to Community Climate Program Technologies
  • ACC 1030 Surveying Cultural Landscapes in the Environmental Humanities
  • ACC 2020 Impacts of Climate Policy on Environmental Management
  • ACC 2030 Indigenous Knowledge in Climate Change and Adaptation
  • ACC 2160 Work Integrated Learning I
  • ACC 3010 Global Climate Change Vulnerability and Adaptation
  • ACC 3020 Climate Future and Modelling
  • ACC 3030 Climate Change Surveillance
  • ACC 3040 Climate Change Statistics in R
  • ACC 3050 Renewable Energy and Clean Technologies
  • ACC 3060 Visualization of Climate Change
  • ACC 3080 Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions
  • ACC 3090 Geographic Information Systems for Climate Change
  • ACC 3100 Climate Change Impacts on Biodiversity
  • ACC 3120 Climate Change Management and Adaptation in Canada
  • ACC 3140 Business Risk Assessment Under Climate Change
  • ACC 3160 Work Integrated Learning II
  • ACC 4010 Oceans, Coastal Systems and Climate Change
  • ACC 4020 Uncertainty and Probability in Climate Change
  • ACC 4040 Computer Programming to Visualize Climate Change
  • ACC 4060 Measuring Your Carbon Footprint through Carbon Accounting and Carbon Trading
  • ACC 4070 Climate Extremes
  • ACC 4080 Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation
  • ACC 4090 Climate Change and Sustainable Tourism
  • ACC 4110 Climate Change and Human Health
  • ACC 4120 International Climate Diplomacy

REQUIRED COURSES FROM OTHER DEPARTMENTS

Biology

  • BIO 1010 Current Issues in Environmental Biology
  • BIO 3270 Field Coastal Ecology

Chemistry

  • CHEM 1110 General Chemistry I
  • CHEM 2020 Environmental Chemistry

Environmental Studies

  • ENV 1010 Introduction to Environmental Studies
  • ENV 3110 Understanding Climate Change

Mathematical & Computational Sciences

  • MATH 1910 Single Variable Calculus I
  • CS 1910 Computer Science I
  • STAT 1910 Introduction to Probability and Statistics

Philosophy

  • PHIL 2030 Environmental Philosophy

Physics

  • PHYS 2630 Atmospheric and Ocean Physics
  • UPEI Courses & Writing Intensive Course

One of:

UPEI 1010 Writing Studies

UPEI 1020 Engaging Ideas and Cultural Contexts

UPEI 1030 Engaging University Contexts and Experience; AND

One writing intensive course

ELECTIVE COURSES FROM OTHER DEPARTMENTS

Economics

  • ECON 1010 Introductory Microeconomics

English

  • ENG 2060 Critical Approaches to Texts I

Environmental Studies

  • ENV 2120 Earth’s Physical Environment
  • ENV 3210 Natural Hazards
  • ENV 3420 Environment and Development
  • ENV 3510 Sustainable Community Planning

History

  • HIST 1010 Canadian History Pre-Confederation

Mathematical & Computational Sciences

  • MATH 1920 Single Variable Calculus II

Philosophy

  • PHIL 1050 Technology, Values, and Science

Physics

  • PHYS 1210 Physics for Life Sciences I

Psychology

  • PSY 1010 Introduction to Psychology: Part I

Sociology & Anthropology

  • SAN 2660 Science, Culture, and Society

COURSE SEQUENCE

The following is the sequence for completion of courses

Semester 1

  • ACC 1010 Introduction to PEI’s Living Climate Lab
  • CHEM 1110 General Chemistry I
  • ENV 1010 Introduction to Environmental Studies
  • MATH 1910 Single Variable Calculus I
  • One of the following electives:
    • ECON 1010 Introductory Microeconomics
    • HIST 1010 Canadian History—Pre-Confederation
    • PHIL 1050 Technology, Values and Society
    • PHYS 1210 Physics for Life Sciences I
    • PSY 1010 Introduction to Psychology: Part I

Semester 2

  • ACC 1020 Introduction to Community Climate Program Technologies
  • ACC 2030 Indigenous Knowledge in Climate Change and Adaptation
  • BIO 1010 Current Issues in Environmental Biology
  • CS 1910 Computer Science I
  • One of the following UPEI courses:
    • UPEI 1010 Writing Studies
    • UPEI 1020 Engaging Ideas and Cultural Contexts
    • UPEI 1030 Engaging University Contexts and Experiences

Semester 3

  • CHEM 2020 Environmental Chemistry
  • STAT 1910 Introduction to Probability and Statistics
  • PHIL 2030 Environmental Philosophy
  • PHYS 2630 Atmospheric and Ocean Physics
    • One of the following electives:
    • ENG 2060 Critical Approaches to Texts I
    • ENV 2120 Earth’s Physical Environment
    • SAN 2660 Science, Culture and Society

Semester 4

  • ACC 1030 Surveying Cultural Landscapes in the Environmental Humanities
  • ACC 2020 Impacts of Climate Policy on Environmental Management
  • BIO 3270 Field Coastal Ecology
  • ENV 3110 Understanding Climate Change
  • One of the following electives:
    • ENV 3210 Natural Hazards
    • ENV 3420 Environment and Development
    • ENV 3510 Sustainable Community Planning
    • MATH 1920 Single Variable Calculus II

Summer Session

  • ACC 2160 Work Integrated Learning I

Semester 5

  • ACC 3010 Global Climate Change Vulnerability and Adaptation
  • ACC 3020 Climate Future and Modelling
  • ACC 3030 Climate Change Surveillance
  • ACC 3050 Renewable Energy and Clean Technologies
  • ACC 3100 Climate Change Impacts on Biodiversity

Semester 6

  • ACC 3040 Climate Change Statistics in R
  • ACC 3060 Visualization of Climate Change
  • ACC 3090 Geographic Information Systems for Climate Change
  • ACC 3120 Climate Change Management and Adaptation in Canada
  • ACC 3140 Business Risk Assessment Under Climate Change

Summer Session

  • ACC 3160 Work Integrated Learning II

Semester 7

  • ACC 3080 Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions
  • ACC 4010 Oceans, Coastal Systems and Climate Change
  • ACC 4020 Uncertainty and Probability in Climate Change
  • ACC 4040 Computer Programming to Visualize Climate Change
  • ACC 4090 Climate Change and Sustainable Tourism

Semester 8

ACC 4060 Measuring Your Carbon Footprint through Carbon Accounting and Carbon Trading

ACC 4070 Climate Extremes

ACC 4080 Climate Change Impact and Adaptation

ACC 4110 Climate Change and Human Health

ACC 4120 International Climate Diplomacy

 

APPLIED CLIMATE CHANGE AND ADAPTATION COURSES

1010 INTRODUCTION TO PEI’S LIVING CLIMATE LAB
This course focuses on how Prince Edward Island is the perfect “living laboratory” for understanding the causes, impacts, and solutions to the challenge of climate change. Students will examine how unique locations on the Island can play a role in understanding the vulnerability, impacts and adaptation to climate change.
Three hours a week, field trips; Three semester hours

1020 INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNITY CLIMATE PROGRAM TECHNOLOGIES
This course provides hands-on experience in utilizing technologies to develop solutions to address climate change. Developing skills in drone technology, video game programming, geographic information systems, global positioning systems, surveillance, and renewable energies, this course examines how technologies can assist in the understanding of the vulnerability, impacts and adaptation to climate change.
Three hours a week, field trips; Three semester hours

1030 SURVEYING CULTURAL LANDSCAPES IN THE ENVIRONMENTAL HUMANITIES
This experiential-based course uses an interdisciplinary approach to explore the ways in which human culture has responded to and been shaped by aspects of the natural environment. After an introductory look at the history of the human response to nature, we will focus on modern and contemporary responses from the areas of philosophy and ethics, visual arts, literature, anthropology, architecture, biology, and music.
Three hours a week; Three semester hours

2020 IMPACTS OF CLIMATE POLICY ON ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT
This course surveys how climate change is understood and responded to by governments, political parties, political movements, and the media. Specific topics also covered in this course include international treaties and regulatory agencies dealing with climate change issues, such as greenhouse gas emissions, ocean warming, drought and flood management, coastal erosion, and climate-change refugees.
Three hours a week; Three semester hours

2030 INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE IN CLIMATE CHANGE AND ADAPTATION
This course brings knowledge of Canadian Indigenous communities’ relationship to the environment as valuable lessons for understanding climate vulnerability, impacts and adaptation. Students will be led by a local First Nations teacher whose valuable insights to implementing efficient uses of our land and spiritual relationships with nature can assist in addressing global sustainability.
Three hours a week; Three semester hours

2160 WORK INTEGRATED LEARNING I
This course is a summer work-integrated-learning (WIL) opportunity facilitated through either a flagship partnership agreement with Parks Canada, or a number of government and industrial organizations that will provide real-world experiences to students that will assist them in securing employment upon graduation.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to the ACC Program Eight weeks full-time work experience
Three semester hours

3010 GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE VULNERABILITY AND ADAPTATION
The course will examine the natural greenhouse effect, and the human contribution to it; how astronomical forces influence the Earth’s climate and their cycles; properties of the atmosphere that influence climate; greenhouse gases; and paleological indicators of climate including ice cores, tree rings, sediment cores, etc.; how these indicators are collected; and what they tell us about past temperature changes.
PREREQUISITE: ENV 3110; Admission to the ACC Program
Three hours a week; Three semester hours

3020 CLIMATE FUTURE AND MODELLING
Students will gain the knowledge and tools necessary to validate climate model outputs against historical observations and produce regional climate change projections. The course will examine greenhouse gas emissions scenarios and their driving of climate models as well as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s Special Report on Emission Scenarios and the new approaches to future scenarios.
PREREQUISITE: ENV 3110; Admission to the ACC Program
Three hours a week, alternating classroom and laboratory; Three semester hours

3030 CLIMATE CHANGE SURVEILLANCE
Students will be given the opportunity to understand how the components of climate are monitored instrumentally, the history of written climate archives, and how climate records are organized. They will plan and set up a climate station that reports to a UPEI climate database, access online climate records, quality control climate records, analyze climate trends, and calculate climate indices.
PREREQUISITE: ACC 1020; Admission to the ACC Program
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week; Three semester hours

3040 CLIMATE CHANGE STATISTICS IN R
The R language is widely used among climatologists for data analysis and provides a wide variety of statistical (linear and nonlinear modelling, classical statistical tests, time-series analysis, classification, clustering, etc.) and graphical techniques, and is highly extensible. This course will provide an introduction to computer programming in R and how to use R for effective climate data analysis.
PREREQUISITE: MATH 1910, CS 1910 and STAT 1910; Admission to the ACC Program
Three hours a week on-line, three hours laboratory; Three semester hours

3050 RENEWABLE ENERGY AND CLEAN TECHNOLOGIES
This course examines sustainability theory and green technology, beginning with an examination of the historical context for the physical, environmental, technological, economic and political aspects of traditional energy systems and energy transitions. Students will then be introduced to different types of renewable energy technology and how they can work as a replacement for conventional technologies.
PREREQUISITE: ACC 1020 and PHYS 2630; Admission to the ACC Program
Three hours a week, field trips; Three semester hours

3060 VISUALIZATION OF CLIMATE CHANGE
An emerging approach to enhancing participation, building awareness and influencing behaviour is the use of 3D landscape visualization to depict past and future scenarios. This course will examine forms of climate change visualization that integrates analytical capabilities of GIS-based software with emotionally-rich and intuitive media and how they are utilized in climate change impact assessment and decision making.
PREREQUISITE: CS 1910; Admission to the ACC Program
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week; Three semester hours

3080 REDUCING GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS
This course will examine the human sources of greenhouse gas emissions to determine the best approaches for meeting a “safe” or “below dangerous level” of atmospheric concentrations of these gases. Students will assess how to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentration at no greater than 450ppmv without replacing existing nuclear power capacity as it retires and without resorting to carbon capture and storage.
PREREQUISITE: ENV 3110 and ACC 3020; Admission to the ACC Program
Three hours a week; Three semester hours

3090 GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS FOR CLIMATE CHANGE GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION
Systems are used in planning, facilities management, resource management, business, and applied research applications. The common thread in this diverse range of applications is the need to store, manipulate, and analyze spatial data. Students will learn how to create their own maps, analyze geographic problems, and apply techniques to improve understanding of climate change.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to the ACC Program
Three hours on-line and three hours laboratory; Three semester hours

3100 CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON BIODIVERSITY
This course will assess biodiversity conservation and policy responses to global climate change; integrate our knowledge of likely future changes on biodiversity; guide the design of adaptation strategies; and establish a framework for future collaborative research on climate change and biodiversity. A field component of the course will establish a biodiversity-monitoring plot using methods developed by The Smithsonian Institution.
PREREQUISITE: BIO 3270; Admission to the ACC Program
Three hours a week with three hours field/laboratory work; Three semester hours

3120 CLIMATE CHANGE MANAGEMENT AND ADAPTATION IN CANADA
This course introduces approaches to environmental management in Canada focused on climate change aspects. Specifically, the course will examine various environmental laws, regulations, policies and legislation; the application of legislation to proposed projects; the principles and fundamentals of completing environmental audits; and the mainstreaming of adaptation into government programming.
PREREQUISITE: ACC 2020; Admission to the ACC Program
Three hours a week; Three semester hours

3140 BUSINESS RISK ASSESSMENT UNDER CLIMATE CHANGE
This interdisciplinary course will provide an understanding of business in the era of climate change by examining the implementation of carbon pricing systems and the need for adaptation measures to address the changing physical and regulatory environments. Specialized activities will focus on the critical role of understanding climate change in business risk assessment using a business sector of each student’s choice.
PREREQUISITE: ENV 3110; Admission to the ACC Program
Three hours a week; Three semester hours

3160 WORK INTEGRATED LEARNING II
This course is Year 2 of a summer work-integrated-learning (WIL) opportunity facilitated through either a flagship partnership agreement with Parks Canada, or a number of government and industrial organizations that will provide real world experiences to students that will assist them in securing employment upon graduation.
PREREQUISITE: ACC 2160 and Admission to the ACC Program
Eight weeks full-time work experience; Three semester hours

4010 OCEANS, COASTAL SYSTEMS AND CLIMATE CHANGE
This course will examine the impacts of global climate change on the oceans and their implications on fisheries and aquaculture; the influence of ocean basins on climate and the development of coasts; and the use of littoral zones in the assessment of the effects of coastal risks and hazards on shorelines. Students will assess the vulnerability of the local fishery to climate impacts and develop adaptation options.
PREREQUISITE: PHYS 2630; Admission to the ACC Program
Three hours a week; Three semester hours

4020 UNCERTAINTY AND PROBABILITY IN CLIMATE CHANGE
Probability theory is a mathematical framework that allows us to describe and analyze random phenomena in the world around us. This course will examine and demonstrate the use of basic concepts such as random experiments, probability axioms, conditional probability, law of total probability, single and multiple random variables, moment-generating functions and random vectors in climate change science assessments.
PREREQUISITE: STAT 1910 and ACC 3060; Admission to the ACC Program
Three hours on-line, three hours laboratory per week; Three semester hours

4040 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING TO VISUALIZE CLIMATE CHANGE
An emerging approach to enhancing participation and building awareness is the use of 3D landscape visualization to depict past and future scenarios. Following an introduction on the basics and essentials of the Unity gaming software, students will use the imagery data acquired by the drone in ACC 3040 to develop a 3D interactive sea-level rise tool.
PREREQUISITE: CS 1910, ACC 3040, ACC 3050 and ACC 3060; Admission to the ACC Program
Three on-line hours, three hours laboratory per week; Three semester hours

4060 MEASURING YOUR CARBON FOOTPRINT THROUGH CARBON ACCOUNTING AND CARBON TRADING
This course will examine greenhouse gas emissions accounting and reporting. Students will design and execute greenhouse gas emissions inventories, employing skills including the identification of analysis boundaries, acquisition of data, calculation of emissions levels, and reporting. As a final exercise, the students will also calculate the carbon footprint of individual businesses, companies or public organizations.
PREREQUISITE: ACC 3140; Admission to the ACC Program
Three hours a week; Three semester hours

4070 CLIMATE EXTREMES
This course will examine the data used to monitor and understand climate extremes; the factors and mechanisms that determine the characteristics of climate extremes; Atlantic Region droughts, floods, heavy precipitation events, heat waves, cold spells, tropical and extra-tropical storms, and ocean waves; specialized tools such as IDF curves; and the influence of temporal considerations in adaptation planning.
PREREQUISITE: STAT 1910 and ACC 3030; Admission to the ACC Program
Three hours a week; Three semester hours

4080 CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS AND ADAPTATION
Adaptation strategies, limits to adaptation, and approaches to adaptation planning will be covered. Students will use regional scenarios of future climate change and the guidelines set by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change to conduct a rapid assessment of climate change impacts and potential adaptation strategies for the PEI economy and ecology, designated for a local entity.
PREREQUISITE: ACC 3020 and ACC 3030; Admission to the ACC Program
Three hours a week; Three semester hours

4090 CLIMATE CHANGE AND SUSTAINABLE TOURISM
Students will develop an awareness of the environmental, sociocultural and economic impacts of tourism; study the possible measures to redress the negative impacts of tourism; develop an appreciation of environmental sustainability in tourism; examine the concept of ecotourism; and incorporate the principles of sustainable tourism into developing and managing tourism destinations and products.
PREREQUISITE: ACC 3140; Admission to the ACC Program
Three hours a week; Three semester hours

4110 CLIMATE CHANGE AND HUMAN HEALTH
This course will explore how human health is shaped by environmental, social, cultural, economic, and political forces; investigate the impact of systems put in place to deal with illness; examine the influence of climate change on vector borne diseases, mental health, chronic health, prenatal health, and food security; and understand First Nations approaches to human health and community well-being.
PREREQUISITE: ACC 2030; Admission to the ACC Program
Three hours a week; Three semester hours

4120 INTERNATIONAL CLIMATE DIPLOMACY
This course provides an historical and analytical view for understanding international environmental relations, examines international environmental agreements and their implications for Canada, identifies the main actors and how they address global environmental problems, and explores environmental governance. Students will take on the role of countries in the United Nations and negotiate a climate agreement.
PREREQUISITE: ACC 2020; Admission to the ACC Program
Three hours a week; Three semester hours

 

Applied Communication, Leadership and Culture

Lisa Chilton, Associate Professor, Director
Joshua MacFadyen, Associate Professor
Katherine Scarth, Associate Professor

Overview
The Applied Communication, Leadership and Culture program explicitly connects the communication skills and leadership training of a Liberal Arts education to successful post- graduation employment. This program is defined by its focus on the transferability of the written, oral and visual communication skills, the critical thinking, and the cultural awareness acquired during a Liberal Arts education to the world beyond academia. Technical skills, work- integrated learning (internships, cooperatives, workplace-generated projects), and career- related mentoring are key components of its design.

Required courses for Major:

All of the following courses are required for a Major in Applied Communication, Leadership and Culture:

  • English 1010: Academic Writing
  • ACLC 1060: Putting Arts to Work I
  • ACLC 1080: Digital Literacy
  • University 2030: Introduction to Leadership Studies
  • English 2340: Public Speaking
  • ACLC 2090: Digital Humanities
  • University 3030: Leadership Theory and Practice
  • ACLC 3060: Putting Arts to Work II
  • ACLC 3080: Leadership for a Changing World
  • English 3810: Professional Writing
  • Arts 4010: Capstone Arts
  • English 4040: Communication and Rhetoric: Capstone Writing OR ACLC 4000: Advanced Workshop in Applied Communication
  • ACLC 4060: Putting Arts to Work III
  • ACLC 4070: Work Integrated Internship

Major co-requisite: Additionally, either UPEI 1020 OR UPEI 1030 should be taken as a co-requisite.

Required courses for Minor
The minor program will require a total of 21 semester hours of program-specific courses. All of the following courses are required for a Minor in Applied Communication, Leadership, and Communication.

ACLC 1060: Putting Arts to Work
ACLC 3060: Putting Arts to Work
ACLC 4060: Putting Arts to Work
ACLC 1080: Digital Literacy
University 2030: Introduction to Leadership Studies
either: English 2340: Public Speaking OR English 3810: Professional Writing
either: ACLC 3080: Leadership for a Changing World OR University 3030: Leadership Theory and Practice

Minor co-requisites:

English 1010: Academic Writing and either UPEI 1020 or UPEI 1030 should be taken as co-requisites.

APPLIED COMMUNICATION, LEADERSHIP, AND CULTURE COURSES

1060 PUTTING ARTS TO WORK I
This course examines the history, purpose, and uses of a Liberal Arts education, with a focus on the three key areas identified in the major: communication, leadership and culture. In this course, students explore the meaning of community engagement, citizenship and social responsibility. Students are introduced to community based research and participatory action research. Current trends in the use of technology to promote social change are examined. This course is for students who want to develop skills and knowledge related to civic engagement and community service learning.
PREREQUISITE: None
3 credit hours

1080 DIGITAL LITERACY
Digital Literacy is designed to prepare students for 21st century learning and employment. Four skill areas are focused upon in this course:
i) Desktop Publishing – Students are introduced to the software that allows them to develop a professional media campaign. Students experiment with designing posters, promotional literature and brochures.
ii) Social Media – Students are introduced to various social media packages.
iii) Video Production – Students are introduced to the basics of video productions. Topics include camera and editing techniques; critical review and assessment of video productions.
iv) Web Design – Any project or new venture requires a slick web presence. Students are introduced to the basics of web design.
This course involves the application of these tools in a project-based setting to create meaningful and relevant products. The technical learning of the different forms of digital literacy is combined with deconstruction and critical analysis of media products. Students experience the course in a hybrid model of face-to-face and online formats.
PREREQUISITE: None
3 credit hours

1910 SPECIAL TOPICS
This is a uniquely titled course offered by the Applied Communication, Leadership, and Culture program at the first year level as a “special course” on a one-time basis.
3 credit hours 

2030 INTRODUCTION TO LEADERSHIP STUDIES
(See UNIV 2030).

2090 DIGITAL HUMANITIES
Digital Humanities involves the use of computational skills, programs and applications in the gathering of evidence and data, preserving and representation of texts and other artifacts, and the use of such tools and techniques in the analysis of this evidence. Digital Humanities approaches can encompass highly sophisticated computational analysis of texts and visualization of data, or the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) tools to map and analyse spatial and geographical aspects of a topic. In this course students explore the tools, methods and analytical potentials associated with digital humanity studies through team-based digital humanities projects. Each year, these course outcomes will be achieved through the study of a specific thematically based subject.
PREREQUISITE: None
3 credit hours

2910 SPECIAL TOPICS
This is a uniquely titled course offered by the Applied Communication, Leadership, and Culture program at the second year level as a “special course” on a one-time basis.
3 credit hours 

3030 LEADERSHIP THEORY AND PRACTICE
(See UNIV 3030).

3060 PUTTING ARTS TO WORK II
Drawing upon skills learned in ACLC 1060 and ACLC 1080, this project-based course examines the skills and knowledge necessary to complete an experiential learning project in one of the key career areas for Liberal Arts majors, such as journalism, human resources, marketing, NGOs, Arts and Culture, Government, and Education. Students work in teams to design, research, and present a project with application outside the university context. Each year, these course outcomes will be achieved through the interdisciplinary study of a specific thematically based subject.
PREREQUISITE: ACLC 1060 or permission of the instructor
3 credit hours

3080 LEADERSHIP FOR A CHANGING WORLD
This course introduces students to pressing global problems and to the ways that individual visionaries, governments, NGOs, and businesses have attempted to solve them. Students explore the connections between the local and the global through location-specific case studies. Topics for discussion may include: war, poverty, disease, forced migrations, and various forms of social inequality.
PREREQUISITE: None
3 credit hours

3910 SPECIAL TOPICS
This is a uniquely titled course offered by the Applied Communication, Leadership, and Culture program at the third year level as a “special course” on a one-time basis.
3 credit hours

4000 ADVANCED WORKSHOP IN APPLIED COMMUNICATION
In ACLC 4000: Advanced Workshop in Applied Communication, students draw upon previous courses and accumulated knowledge about their chosen fields of future employment to design a subject-specific set of communication products.  The purpose of this course is to provide upper-level students with an opportunity to hone the practical application of their communication skills through a workshop process. A requirement of the course will be that students use a variety of forms of communication in the presentation of their ideas and information on their chosen subjects.
PREREQUISITE: ACLC 3060 or English 2340 and English 3810
3 credit hours

4060 PUTTING ARTS TO WORK III
Following on ACLC 3060, this course guides students through the development of a second, more ambitious project. Included in the course are an introduction to project management concepts and methods, with instruction on the process of developing a business plan, and an introduction to some of the fundamental techniques of modern marketing. Team projects require students to apply what they have learned to the work of community organizations. Each year, these course outcomes will be achieved through the study of different sets of social and cultural themes.
PREREQUISITE: ACLC 3060 or permission of the instructor
3 credit hours

4070 WORK INTEGRATED PRACTICUM
In this course theory and professional practice are combined. Students work in an approved agency or professional workplace for a total of 40 hours. This capstone experience provides students with an opportunity to integrate essential and advanced skills in a field related to their future career interests. While students engage this practicum/workplace project on their own, all projects are presented in a public forum.
PREREQUISITE: ACLC 3060 or permission of the instructor
3 credit hours

4910 SPECIAL TOPICS
This is a uniquely titled course offered by the Applied Communication, Leadership, and Culture program at the fourth year level as a “special course” on a one-time basis.
3 credit hours

Applied Human Sciences

Applied Human Sciences Faculty

Doris M. Anderson, Professor Emerita
Dany MacDonald, Associate Professor, Chair
Kathy Gottschall-Pass, Professor
Jennifer Taylor, Professor
William Montelpare, Professor
Rebecca Reed-Jones, Associate Professor
Melissa Rossiter, Associate Professor
Travis Saunders, Associate Professor
Sarah Finch, Assistant Professor
Sarah Hewko, Assistant Professor
Adam Johnston, Assistant Professor
Michael MacLellan, Assistant Professor
Joseph Baker, Adjunct Professor
Sharon Compton, Adjunct Professor
Carolanne Nelson, Adjunct Professor
Leisha Strachan, Adjunct Professor
Carlos Zerpa, Adjunct Professor
Michael Zhang, Adjunct Professor

The mission of the Department of Applied Human Sciences is to promote the health and optimal development of individuals, families and communities by:

  • Preparing students to be leaders in their chosen discipline or profession
  • Generating new knowledge through outstanding scholarship
  • Forming strong links with the community and engaging in professional service

The overall aim of the Department is to provide a liberal university education which draws from a broad academic base: the biological, physical and social sciences; humanities; and professional studies. The curriculum reflects current scientific knowledge in Foods and Nutrition, Family Science, and Kinesiology, disciplines which are concerned with improving the life conditions of individuals, families, and communities.

DEGREE PROGRAMS

The Department of Applied Human Sciences offers several programs of study.

Family Science Programs/Certifications:
Bachelor of Science with a Major in Family Science
Bachelor of Child and Family Studies
Provisional Certified Family Life Educator (CFLE)
Minor in Family Science

Foods and Nutrition Programs:
Bachelor of Science with a Major in Foods and Nutrition
Bachelor of Science with an Honours in Foods and Nutrition
Minor in Foods and Nutrition
Integrated Dietetic Internship Program

Kinesiology
Bachelor of Science with a Major in Kinesiology

Family Science

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN FAMILY SCIENCE

Students following this degree program must complete 42 semester hours of required courses in Family Science and 9 additional semester hours of credit in Foods and Nutrition.

REQUIRED COURSES FOR THE FAMILY SCIENCE MAJOR

Family Science
1140 – Families in Contemporary Society
2210 – Family Resource Management
2410 – Human Development
2420 – Dynamics of Family Living
2610 – Communications
3310 – Introduction to Research Methods
3810 – Professional Practice with Children and Families
3820 – Program Planning and Evaluation
4110 – Field Placement I
4120 – Field Placement II
Four Family Science electives at the 2nd, 3rd, or 4th year level

Foods and Nutrition:
Foods and Nutrition 1110 – Introductory Foods
Foods and Nutrition 2110 – Introductory Nutrition I
Foods and Nutrition 2120 – Introductory Nutrition II

REQUIRED COURSES FROM OTHER DEPARTMENTS

Mathematics
1110 – Finite Mathematics

Statistics
1210 – Introductory Statistics

Chemistry
1110 – General Chemistry I
1120 – General Chemistry II

Biology
1220 – Human Physiology
1310 – Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology

UPEI courses and Writing Intensive Course
One of:
UPEI 1010 – Writing Studies – Engaging Writing, Rhetoric, and Communication,
UPEI 1020 – Inquiry Studies – Engaging Ideas and Cultural Contexts, OR
UPEI 1030 – University Studies – Engaging University Contexts and Experience
AND one writing intensive course

Social Sciences
Two 3-semester hour courses from Psychology, Sociology or Anthropology
Students are advised to consult with the Department Chair or their Faculty Advisor prior to registration.

COURSE SEQUENCE

Following is the usual sequence for completion of courses:

First Year

Foods and Nutrition 1110 – Introductory Foods
Family Science 1140 – Families in Contemporary Society
Biology 1310 – Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
Chemistry 1110 – General Chemistry I
Chemistry 1120 – General Chemistry II
One of UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030
Math 1110 – Finite Mathematics
Two Social Sciences
One free elective

Second Year

Foods and Nutrition 2110 – Introductory Nutrition I
Foods and Nutrition 2120 – Introductory Nutrition II
Family Science 2210 – Family Resource Management
Family Science 2410 – Human Development
Family Science 2420 – Dynamics of Family Living
Family Science 2610 – Communications
Statistics 1210 – Introductory Statistics
Biology 1220 – Human Physiology
Two free electives

Third Year

Family Science 3310 – Introduction to Research Methods
Family Science 3810 – Professional Practice with Children and Families
Family Science 3820 – Program Planning and Evaluation
Two Family Science electives
Five free electives

Fourth Year

Family Science 4110 – Field Placement I
Family Science 4120 – Field Placement II
Two Family Science electives
Six free electives

Child and Family Studies

Admission to this program has been suspended

The Bachelor of Child and Family Studies is a two-year post-diploma degree available to graduates of diploma programs in Early Childhood Education at Holland College or similar post-secondary institutions. Successful completion of a grade 12 math course (or an equivalent course) is strongly recommended. Students in the Bachelor of Child and Family Studies must complete a total of 60 semester hours at UPEI.

REQUIRED COURSES FOR THE CHILD AND FAMILY STUDIES DEGREE

Family Science 2210 – Family Resource Management
Family Science 2410 – Human Development
Family Science 2420 – Dynamics of Family Living
Family Science 2610 – Communications
Family Science 3310 – Introduction to Research Methods
Family Science 3810 – Professional Practice with Children and Families
Family Science 3820 – Program Planning and Evaluation
Family Science 4110 – Field Placement I
Family Science 4710 – Parent-Child Interaction
One Family Science elective at the 2000, 3000 or 4000 level
Math 1010 or 1110 – Elements of Mathematics or Finite Mathematics
Statistics 1210 – Introductory Statistics
One of UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030
One writing intensive course
Six free electives

NOTES:

Suggested electives for those planning to apply to the Bachelor of Education Program at UPEI are found under the Admissions for Bachelor of Education.

COURSE SEQUENCE

First Year
Family Science 2210 – Family Resource Management
Family Science 2410 – Human Development
Family Science 2420 – Dynamics of Family Living
Family Science 2610 – Communications
Family Science 3810 – Professional Practice with Children and Families
Family Science 3820 – Program Planning and Evaluation
Math 1010 or 1110 – Elements of Mathematics or Finite Mathematics
Statistics 1210 – Introductory Statistics
One of UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030 and a writing intensive course
One free elective

Second Year
Family Science 3310 – Introduction to Research Methods
Family Science 4110 – Field Placement I
Family Science 4710 – Parent-Child Interaction
One Family Science Elective at the 3000 or 4000 level
Six free electives

PROVISIONAL CERTIFICATION— NATIONAL COUNCIL ON FAMILY RELATIONS

The Department of Applied Human Sciences is approved by the National Council on Family Relations to offer the course work in order for graduates from the Family Science and Child and Family Studies programs to apply for provisional certification as a Certified Family Life Educator (CFLE). CFLEs work in a variety of health and social service positions. In particular, CLFEs are prepared to work with individuals and families in the areas of prevention and education. Students interested in becoming a CFLE need to ensure that they have completed all of the required course work for their major in addition to completing the following Family Science electives:

  • Family Science 3830 – Issues in Family Law and Social Policy
  • Family Science 4710 – Parent-Child Interaction
  • Family Science 4910 – Human Sexuality

FAMILY SCIENCE MINOR

Students in the Minor Program in Family Science must complete a total of 21 semester hours of Family Science. This consists of 9 semester hours of required core courses and 12 semester hours of Family Science electives.

Required:

  • Family Science 1140 – Families in Contemporary Society
  • Family Science 2210 – Family Resource Management
  • Family Science 2420 – Dynamics of Family Living
  • 12 additional hours of electives at the 2000, 3000 or 4000 level excluding:
    • Family Science 3310
    • Family Science 3810
    • Family Science 4110
    • Family Science 4120

Students intending to complete a Minor in Family Science are advised to consult with the Chair of the Department of Applied Human Sciences to ensure that they have the required course prerequisites. A student majoring in Foods and Nutrition is eligible to pursue the Family Science Minor.

Foods and Nutrition

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN FOODS & NUTRITION

Students following this degree program must complete 42 semester hours of required courses in Foods and Nutrition.

REQUIRED COURSES FOR FOODS AND NUTRITION MAJOR

Foods and Nutrition
1010 – Concepts and Controversies in Nutrition
1110 – Introductory Foods
2110 – Introductory Nutrition I
2120 – Introductory Nutrition II
2230 – Determinants of Dietary Behaviour
2610 – Communications
3020 – Advanced Foods
3310 – Introduction to Research Methods
3510 – Nutritional Assessment
3520 – Clinical Nutrition I
3820 – Program Planning & Evaluation
4120 – Human Metabolism
4340 – Community Nutrition
One Foods and Nutrition elective at the 3000 or 4000 level

REQUIRED COURSES FROM OTHER DEPARTMENTS

Mathematics
1110 – Finite Mathematics or 1120 Calculus for the Managerial, Social and Life Sciences

Statistics
1210 – Introductory Statistics

Chemistry
1110 – General Chemistry I
1120 – General Chemistry II
2430 – Organic Chemistry for the Life Sciences
3530 – Biochemistry

Biology
1220 – Human Physiology
1310 – Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
2060 – Microbiology

Business
1710 – Organizational Behaviour

Social Sciences
Two 3 semester hour courses

UPEI courses and Writing Intensive Course
One of:
UPEI 1010 – Writing Studies – Engaging Writing, Rhetoric, and Communication,
UPEI 1020 – Inquiry Studies – Engaging Ideas and Cultural Contexts, OR
UPEI 1030 – University Studies – Engaging University Contexts and Experience AND one writing intensive course

COURSE SEQUENCE

Following is the usual sequence for completion of courses:

First Year

Foods and Nutrition 1010 – Concepts and Controversies in Nutrition
Foods and Nutrition 1110 – Introductory Foods
Biology 1220  – Human physiology
Biology 1310 – Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
Chemistry 1110 – General Chemistry I
Chemistry 1120 – General Chemistry II
One of UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030
Math 1110 – Finite Mathematics OR
Math 1120 – Calculus for the Managerial, Social and Life Sciences
Two 3 semester hours Social Science

Second Year

Foods and Nutrition 2110 – Introductory Nutrition I
Foods and Nutrition 2120 – Introductory Nutrition II
Foods and Nutrition 2230 – Determinants of Dietary Behaviour
Foods and Nutrition 2610 – Communications
Biology 2060 – Microbiology
Chemistry 2430 – Organic Chemistry for the Life Sciences
Statistics 1210 – Introductory Statistics
Business 1710 – Organizational Behaviour
Two free electives

Third Year

Foods and Nutrition 3020 – Advanced Foods
Foods and Nutrition 3310 – Introduction to Research Methods
Foods and Nutrition 3510 – Nutritional Assessment
Foods and Nutrition 3520 – Clinical Nutrition I
Foods and Nutrition 3820 – Program Planning & Evaluation
Chemistry 3530 – Biochemistry
Four free electives

Fourth Year

Foods and Nutrition 4120 – Human Metabolism
Foods and Nutrition 4340 – Community Nutrition
One Foods and Nutrition elective at the 3000 or 4000 level
Six free electives

DIETETIC OPTION

In addition to the courses required for the Foods and Nutrition major, students interested in applying for dietetic internship must take Foods and Nutrition 3210 (Foodservice Systems Management), Foods and Nutrition 3710 (Lifespan Nutrition), Foods and Nutrition 3830 (Professional Practice in Dietetics), Foods and Nutrition 4220 (Quantity Food Production), Foods and Nutrition 4310 (Evidence-Based Practice in the Health Sciences), and Foods and Nutrition 4610 (Clinical Nutrition II).

COURSE SEQUENCE

Following is the usual sequence for completion of courses:

First Year
Foods and Nutrition 1010 – Concepts and Controversies in Nutrition
Foods and Nutrition 1110 – Introductory Foods
Biology 1220 – Human Physiology
Biology 1310 – Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
Chemistry 1110 – General Chemistry I
Chemistry 1120 – General Chemistry II
One of UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030
Math 1110 – Finite Mathematics OR Math 1120 – Calculus for the Managerial, Social and Life Sciences
Two 3 semester hours Social Science

Second Year
Foods and Nutrition 2110 – Introductory Nutrition I
Foods and Nutrition 2120 – Introductory Nutrition II
Foods and Nutrition 2230 – Determinants of Dietary Behaviour
Foods and Nutrition 2610 – Communications
Biology 2060 – Microbiology
Chemistry 2430 – Organic Chemistry for the Life Sciences
Statistics 1210 – Introductory Statistics
Business 1710 – Organizational Behaviour
Two free electives

Third Year
Foods and Nutrition 3020 – Advanced Foods
Foods and Nutrition 3210 – Foodservice Systems Management
Foods and Nutrition 3310 – Introduction to Research Methods
Foods and Nutrition 3510 – Nutritional Assessment
Foods and Nutrition 3520 – Clinical Nutrition I
Foods and Nutrition 3710 – Lifespan Nutrition
Foods and Nutrition 3820 – Program Planning & Evaluation
Foods and Nutrition 3830 – Professional Practice in Dietetics
Chemistry 3530 – Biochemistry
One free elective

Fourth Year
Foods and Nutrition 4120 – Human Metabolism
Foods and Nutrition 4220 – Quantity Food Production
Foods and Nutrition 4310 – Evidence-Based Practice in the Health Sciences
Foods and Nutrition 4340 – Community Nutrition
Foods and Nutrition 4610 – Clinical Nutrition II
Five free electives

Students in Foods and Nutrition may apply for admission to the optional Integrated Dietetic Internship Program. For more information about the program, see the Dietetic Internship program page.

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONOURS PROGRAM IN FOODS AND NUTRITION

The Honours program in Foods and Nutrition is designed to provide research experience at the undergraduate level within the BSc Program. It is available to students with a strong academic background who intend to continue studies at the post graduate level in Foods and Nutrition or related field, or to students who intend to pursue a career where research experience would be an asset.

The Honours program differs from the major in requiring a two-semester research course with thesis report for a total of 126 semester hours for the degree. The research component is to be completed within the BSc program and may require one summer (four months) preceding the graduating year. Evaluation of the research data and writing of the thesis would normally be done during the fall and/or spring session in Foods and Nutrition 4900: Advanced Research and Thesis. The following are the course requirements for the Honours program in Foods and Nutrition.

First Year
Foods and Nutrition 1010 – Concepts and Controversies in Nutrition
Foods and Nutrition 1110 – Introductory Foods
Chemistry 1110-1120 – General Chemistry I and II
Math 1110 OR 1120 – Finite Mathematics or Calculus for the Managerial, Social and Life Sciences
Biology 1220 – Human Physiology
Biology 1310 – Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
One of UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030
Two 3 semester hours Social Science

Second Year
Foods and Nutrition 2110-2120 – Introductory Nutrition I and II
Foods and Nutrition 2230 – Determinants of Dietary Behaviour
Foods and Nutrition 2610 – Communications
Chemistry 2430 – Organic Chemistry for the Life Sciences
Biology 2060 – Microbiology
Statistics 1210 – Introductory Statistics
Business 1710 – Organizational Behaviour
Two free electives

Third Year
Foods and Nutrition 3020 – Advanced Foods
Foods and Nutrition 3310 – Introduction in Research Methods
Foods and Nutrition 3510 – Nutritional Assessment
Foods and Nutrition 3520 – Clinical Nutrition I
Foods and Nutrition 3820 – Program Planning and Evaluation
Chemistry 3530 – Biochemistry
Four free electives

Fourth Year
Foods and Nutrition 4120 – Human Metabolism
Foods and Nutrition 4340 – Community Nutrition
Foods and Nutrition 4900 – Advanced Research and Thesis
One Foods and Nutrition electives at the 3000 or 4000 level
Four free electives

NOTE: Honours students are advised to take an advanced statistics course and consult with their advisor for assistance in choosing electives that will support their research projects.

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS

For admission to the Honours program, students must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 in all Foods and Nutrition courses combined and a CGPA of 2.7 in all previous courses. Permission of the Department is also required and is contingent on the student finding an advisor and on acceptance of the research project by the Department of Applied Human Sciences. Students interested in completing an honours should consult with the Department Chair as early as possible and not later than March 31st of the student’s third year.

To graduate with Honours in Foods and Nutrition, students must maintain a GPA of 3.0 in all Foods and Nutrition courses combined and a CGPA of 2.7.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN FOODS AND NUTRITION

Students in the Minor Program in Foods and Nutrition must complete a total of 21 semester hours of credit in Foods and Nutrition.

These consist of 12 semester hours of required core courses as follows:

  • Foods and Nutrition 1010 – Concepts and Controversies in Nutrition
  • Foods and Nutrition 1110 – Introductory Foods
  • Foods and Nutrition 2110 – Introductory Nutrition I
  • Foods and Nutrition 2120 – Introductory Nutrition II

Nine additional hours of electives must be chosen at the 2000, 3000 or 4000 level. Students intending to do a Minor in Foods and Nutrition are advised to consult with the Chair of the Department of Applied Human Sciences to ensure that they have the required course prerequisites.

Kinesiology

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN KINESIOLOGY

Students following this degree program must complete 57 semester hours of required courses in Kinesiology and 6 semester hours of required courses in Foods and Nutrition, and 6 semester hours of courses in humanities. Students are advised to consult with the Department Chair or their Faculty Advisor prior to registration.

REQUIRED COURSES FOR THE KINESIOLOGY MAJOR

Kinesiology courses
1010 – Introduction to Kinesiology
2020 – Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology
2210 – Introduction to Exercise Physiology
2320 – Introduction to Motor Learning and Control
2510 – Anatomical Kinesiology
3120 – Introduction to Biomechanics
3310 – Introduction to Research Methods
3410 – Human Motor Development
3430 – Physiological Assessment and Training
3820 – Program Planning and Evaluation
4810 – Analysis of Human Movement
Eight Kinesiology electives at the 3000 or 4000 level

Foods and Nutrition
2110 – Introductory Nutrition I
2120 – Introductory Nutrition II

REQUIRED COURSES FROM OTHER DEPARTMENTS

Mathematics
1120 – Calculus for the Managerial, Social and Life Sciences

Statistics
1210 – Introductory Statistics

Chemistry
1110 – General Chemistry I
1120 – General Chemistry II

Physics
1210 – Physics for Life Sciences I

Biology
1210 – Human Anatomy
1220 – Human Physiology
1310 – Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology

UPEI courses and Writing Intensive Course
One of:
UPEI 1010 – Writing Studies – Engaging Writing, Rhetoric, and Communication,
UPEI 1020 – Inquiry Studies – Engaging Ideas and Cultural Contexts, OR
UPEI 1030 – University Studies – Engaging University Contexts and Experience AND One writing intensive course

Psychology
1010-1020 – Introductory Psychology I and II
Students are advised to consult with the Department Chair or their Faculty Advisor prior to registration.

COURSE SEQUENCE

Following is the usual sequence for completion of courses

Year One
Kinesiology 1010 – Introduction to Kinesiology
Biology 1210 – Human Anatomy
Biology 1220 – Human Physiology
Chemistry 1110 – General Chemistry I
Chemistry 1120 – General Chemistry II
One of UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030
Math 1120 – Calculus for the Managerial, Social and Life Sciences
Psychology 1010 – Introductory Psychology I
Psychology 1020 – Introductory Psychology II
One free elective

Year Two
Kinesiology 2020 – Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology
Kinesiology 2210 – Introduction to Exercise Physiology
Kinesiology 2320 – Introduction to Motor Learning and Control
Kinesiology 2510 – Anatomical Kinesiology
Foods and Nutrition 2110 – Introductory Nutrition I
Foods and Nutrition 2120 – Introductory Nutrition II
Biology 1310 – Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
Statistics 1210 – Introductory Statistics
Physics 1210 – Physics for Life Sciences I
One free elective

Year Three
Kinesiology 3120 – Introduction to Biomechanics
Kinesiology 3310 – Introduction to Research Methods
Kinesiology 3410 – Human Motor Development
Kinesiology 3430 – Physiological Assessment and Training
Kinesiology 3820 – Program Planning and Evaluation
Two Kinesiology electives at the 3000 or 4000 level
One Humanities elective
Two free electives

Year Four
Kinesiology 4810 – Analysis of Human Movement
Six Kinesiology electives at the 3000 or 4000 level
One Humanities elective
Two free electives

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONOURS PROGRAM IN KINESIOLOGY

The Honours program in Kinesiology is designed to provide research experience at the undergraduate level within the BSc Program. It is available to students with a strong academic background who intend to continue studies at the post graduate level in Kinesiology or related field, or to students who intend to pursue a career where research experience would be an asset.

The Honours program differs from the major in requiring a two-semester research course with thesis report for a total of 126 semester hours for the degree. The research component is to be completed within the BSc program through completion of Kinesiology 4900: Advanced Research and Thesis.

The following are the course requirements for the Honours program in Kinesiology.

Year One
Kinesiology 1010  – Introduction to Kinesiology
Biology 1210  – Human Anatomy
Biology 1220  – Human Physiology
Chemistry 1110  – General Chemistry I
Chemistry 1120  – General Chemistry II
One of UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030
Math 1120 – Calculus for the Managerial, Social and Life Sciences
Psychology 1010  – Introductory Psychology I
Psychology 1020 – Introductory Psychology II
One free elective

Year Two
Kinesiology 2020  – Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology
Kinesiology 2210  – Introduction to Exercise Physiology
Kinesiology 2320  – Introduction to Motor Learning and Control
Kinesiology 2510  – Anatomical Kinesiology
Foods and Nutrition 2110  – Introductory Nutrition I
Foods and Nutrition 2120  – Introductory Nutrition II
Biology 1310  – Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
Statistics 1210  – Introductory Statistics
Physics 1210  – Physics for Life Sciences I
One free elective

Year Three
Kinesiology 3120 – Introduction to Biomechanics
Kinesiology 3310 – Introduction to Research Methods
Kinesiology 3410 – Human Motor Development
Kinesiology 3430 – Physiological Assessment and Training
Kinesiology 3820 – Program Planning and Evaluation
Two Kinesiology electives at the 3000 or 4000 level
One Humanities elective
Two free electives

Year Four
Kinesiology 4810 – Analysis of Human Movement
Kinesiology 4900  – Advanced Research and Thesis
Six Kinesiology electives at the 3000 or 4000 level
One Humanities elective

NOTE: Honours students are advised to consult with their advisor for assistance in choosing electives that will support their research project.

Entrance Requirements
For admission to the Honours program, students must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 in all Kinesiology courses combined and an overall GPA of 2.7 in all previous courses. Permission of the Department is also required and is contingent on the student finding an advisor and on acceptance of the research project by the Department of Applied Human Sciences. Students interested in completing the honours program should consult with the Department Chair as early as possible, no later than March 31st of the student’s third year.

To graduate with Honours in Kinesiology, students must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 in all Kinesiology courses combined and an overall GPA of 2.7.

QUALIFICATION FOR PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION
Graduates of our Kinesiology program are eligible to apply for many certifications after graduation. Depending on the desired certifications, students may need to take certain elective courses beyond the core curriculum of the program. Additionally, most certifications require an entrance exam and volunteer hours prior to becoming certified. Students are encouraged to review certification requirements early in their degree so they are able to plan their education and volunteer hours accordingly. Below is a list of popular certifications, although this list is not exhaustive.

Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology (CSEP):
Certified Personal Trainer (CSEP-CPT) and Certified  Exercise Physiologist (CSEP-CEP)

College of Kinesiologists of Ontario
Health and Fitness Federation of Canada:
Certified Personal Trainer (HFFC-CPT) and Certified Exercise Physiologist (HFFC-CEP)

National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA):
Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS)

CO-OP EDUCATION IN APPLIED HUMAN SCIENCES

The UPEI Co-op Program is an integrated approach to university education which enables students to alternate academic terms on campus with work terms in suitable employment. The success of such programs is founded on the principle that students are able to apply theoretical knowledge from course studies in the workplace and return to the classroom with practical workplace experience. Students who successfully complete all the requirements of the program will have the notation entered on their transcripts and on the graduation parchment.

Students accepted into the program complete at least three paid work terms of normally 14 weeks duration, and three professional development courses. Credits earned through completion of work terms are counted as general electives.

The Co-op option is available to full-time students in the Foods and Nutrition program (excluding dietetic option).  Applications to the Co-op Education Program are normally made after completion of the first year of study.

See the Co-operative Education Program section of the UPEI Academic Calendar for more information.

Integrated Dietetic Internship Program

This dietetic education program is an accredited program recognized by the Partnership for Dietetic Education and Practice (PDEP).

Students majoring in Foods and Nutrition may apply for admission to the optional Integrated Dietetic Internship Program. The integrated approach to professional training enables students to build upon and apply theoretical knowledge gained from their academic program. On successful completion of the Program, students will have fulfilled the competencies required to reach entry-level professional dietetic competence as determined by the PDEP, and will be eligible to apply for admission to the dietetics profession.

Internship levels and their results will be recorded on students’ transcripts. Upon successful completion of both the accredited degree program and the required internship levels, students will be granted a university certificate attesting to their successful completion of the Integrated Dietetic Internship Program.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
All students majoring in Foods and Nutrition who have achieved a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 with no Foods and Nutrition course below a GPA of 2.7, and have completed the following required courses will be eligible to apply for the program:

Foods & Nutrition 1110 Introductory Foods
Foods & Nutrition 2110 Introductory Nutrition I
Foods & Nutrition 2120 Introductory Nutrition II
Foods & Nutrition 2230 Determinants of Dietary Behaviour
Foods & Nutrition 3210 Food Service Management
Foods & Nutrition 3310 Research Methods
Foods & Nutrition 3510 Nutritional Assessment
Foods & Nutrition 3830 Professional Practice in Dietetics
Chemistry 1110 General Chemistry I
Chemistry 1120 General Chemistry II
Chemistry 2430 Organic Chemistry
Biology 1220 Human Physiology
Biology 1310 Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology

Interested candidates are encouraged to consult the Director of Internship early in their program to discuss admission and course scheduling. Students interested in pursuing this option are also encouraged to seek relevant paid or unpaid work experience in the summer preceding application. A formal application for admission to the Integrated Dietetic Internship Program is required. Application forms are available from the department.

A selection panel will determine student admissibility based upon academic performance, paid and unpaid work experience, motivation and personal suitability. Students meeting the admission criteria will be ranked and the top candidates will be interviewed. By the first week of February, the Professional Practice Coordinator Dietetics will notify, in writing, all students interviewed as to the outcome of the process.

Students accepted into the dietetic internship program must show evidence of all immunizations being up to date prior entering the program. As well, each student will be required to show proof of a completed criminal record check prior to the start date.

CONTINUANCE REQUIREMENTS
Once admitted to the program, students must continue in full-time enrolment between internship levels. An academic review of students’ performance will take place at the end of each semester. Students are required to maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 with no Foods and Nutrition course below a GPA of 2.7. Students who fail to meet these standards or who fail a required course(s) will not be permitted to begin the next internship level until standards are met.

Internship students must complete all of the regular requirements for a Bachelor of Science (Foods and Nutrition) degree. Foods and Nutrition 3210 (Food Service Systems Management), Foods and Nutrition 3830 (Professional Practice in Dietetics), Foods and Nutrition 4220 (Quantity Food Production), Foods and Nutrition 4310 (Evidence Based Practice in the Health Sciences), and Foods and Nutrition 4610 (Clinical Nutrition II) must be included within their degree program.

In addition to the above requirements, students must successfully complete two internship levels.

INTERNSHIP SCHEDULE
Students must complete two internship levels in the Integrated Dietetic Internship Program. The first internship level DIET 1000 is scheduled in the spring and summer months between the third and fourth academic years. The second internship level DIET 2000 is completed following graduation from the degree program. The first internship level will include a one week professional practice course, followed by an eight week placement, for a total of 9 weeks. This will be followed by a second internship level of no less then 26 weeks, for a total of at least 35 weeks.

Satisfactory fulfilment of the Integrated Dietetic Internship levels requires:

1. A satisfactory evaluation from the Preceptor at the placement site.
2. Completion of the minimum number of required competencies as indicated on the appropriate evaluation form.

WITHDRAWAL CONDITIONS

Students will be required to withdraw from the Integrated Dietetic Internship Program if:

1. They are dismissed from, resign, or fail to achieve the required competencies during the program, or
2. They do not achieve a passing grade in required courses or do not maintain the standards for nutrition courses and overall GPA necessary for continuance in the Integrated Dietetic Internship Program, or
3. They fail to abide by the policies and procedures set out by the Advisory Committee for the Integrated Dietetic Internship Program and/or those of the placement organization.

Students who voluntarily withdraw from or who are required to withdraw from the Integrated Dietetic Internship Program may remain in and continue with the regular Foods and Nutrition majors program.

REGISTRATION AND FEES

Students are required to register for both internship levels according to normal registration procedures. Internship levels will officially be designated on students’ transcripts as pass or fail. Students pay for their internship levels as they are taken. Students accepted to the Integrated Dietetic Internship Program are required to pay an Internship Fee (see Calendar section on fees). This amount is to be paid to the Accounting Office prior to the start date for the specified internship level.

Additional information on policies and procedures related to the Integrated Dietetic Internship Program are available from the Department.

Dieticians of Canada Graduate Internship

The Foods & Nutrition program is an accredited program recognized by the Partnership for Dietetic Education and Practice (PDEP) and prepares students for eligibility to apply for a graduate internship.

To apply for a position in an accredited graduate dietetic internship program, students must meet the academic requirements established by PDEP and should have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 in their last 30 courses. In addition to the courses required for the Foods and Nutrition major, students interested in applying for a graduate dietetic internship placement must take Foods and Nutrition 3210, Foods and Nutrition 3830, Foods and Nutrition 4220, Foods and Nutrition 4310, and Foods and Nutrition 4610.

Students should consult with the Director of Internship for details and counselling by the end of second year.

NOTES REGARDING 1000-LEVEL FAMILY SCIENCE AND FOODS AND NUTRITION

Foods and Nutrition 1110 and Family Science 1140 are introductory courses required for, but not restricted to, Foods and Nutrition and Family Science majors. A grade of at least 60% in Foods and Nutrition 1110 and Family Science 1140 is a prerequisite for all Foods and Nutrition and Family Science courses above the 1000 level. However, this course prerequisite may be waived with the permission of the Chair for individual courses.

Foods and Nutrition 1010 is a course designed primarily for non-Foods and Nutrition or Family Science majors who will not be taking advanced courses in Nutrition; however it will be accepted for credit as an elective in the Foods and Nutrition or Family Science majors programs. Credit will NOT be allowed for Foods and Nutrition 1010 if completed after Foods and Nutrition 2110.

FAMILY SCIENCE COURSES

1140 FAMILIES IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY
This course is an introduction to the study of families and contemporary issues facing today’s families. Topics include changing family structures, current trends in Canadian families, the interaction of families with other systems, and theories used to study families. The course also includes an introduction to family life education including the philosophy, nature and purpose of family education.
Three lecture hours
Note: BCFS students are not able to credit FSc 1140 as an elective.

2210 FAMILY RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
This course is a study of the management process and how it relates to decision making and resource use by individuals and families. Topics include management history and theories; values and goals; resources; planning and decision making. The management of stress and fatigue, time, finances and environmental resources are also discussed. Students gain experience in the application of theory to a variety of individual and family managerial situations.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 1140 or a student in the Bachelor of Child and Family Studies
Three lecture hours

2410 HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
This course explores human development from conception to old age, including physical, cognitive, and psychological aspects. Topics include attachment across the lifespan; various theories used to study human development; gender; the aging process; and societal factors affecting human development. The reciprocal relationship between human development and their environments is emphasized.
Cross-listed with Kinesiology 2410
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 1140, a student in the Bachelor of Child and Family Studies or Kinesiology 1010 and admission to BSc Kinesiology program
Three lecture hours
NOTE: Credit will not be allowed for Family Science/Kinesiology 2410 if a student has already received credit for Psychology 2010

2420 DYNAMICS OF FAMILY LIVING
This course examines the multiple realities of living in families. Using current theory and research in family science, it focuses on family diversity extending across history, gender, nationality, culture, and age. The course covers crucial issues such as family stress, later-life families, family violence, the work-family interface, parenting, and other areas of family living. The effects of legislation, and social economics and technical change on families are discussed.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 1140 or registration in the Child and Family Studies Program
Three lecture hours

2430 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
(See Psychology 2420).

2440 PHILOSOPHIES OF LOVE AND SEXUALITY
(See Philosophy 2420).

2610 COMMUNICATIONS
This course is an introduction to the basic principles of communication. The course balances communication theory and research with skills acquisition and practice to help students communicate more effectively in a variety of professional settings. Students are provided with an opportunity to develop skills in interpersonal and group communication, public speaking, and interviewing.
Cross-listed with Foods and Nutrition 2610 and Kinesiology 3610
PREREQUISITE: Student must have at least second year standing in Foods and Nutrition, or Radiography, or Kinesiology OR be granted permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

3050 ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT AND ADJUSTMENT
(See Psychology 3050).

3080 CHILD DEVELOPMENT
(See Psychology 308).

3100 ADULT DEVELOPMENT
(See Psychology 3090).

3090 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Family Science at the 3000 level.

3310 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS
This course is an introduction to research intended to enable students to read critically and evaluate current research. Students are introduced to various types of research designs, research terminology, and the components of the research process.
Cross-listed with Foods and Nutrition/Kinesiology 3310
PREREQUISITE: Statistics 1210. Preference for admission will be given to students registered in the Family Science, Foods and Nutrition, Child and Family Studies, Kinesiology or Radiography programs
Three lecture hours

3440 INTIMATE RELATIONSHIPS
(See Psychology 3420).

3540 KINSHIP AND FAMILY
(See Anthropology 3520).

3530 PROGRAMS AND SERVICES FOR OLDER ADULTS AND CAREGIVERS
This course is an examination of the diverse array of programs and services designed for older adults, and caregivers of older adults, from a legislative, consumer, and provider perspective. Students will gain insight into these programs and services including their place in the array of services for older adults and the implications of such programs and services for older adults, caregivers, and society.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 1140
Three lecture hours

3610 CURRENT ISSUES IN CHILDREN’S HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT
This course is an advanced study of current issues and research in children’s health and development in a family context. Emphasis is placed on the promotion of healthy behaviours and development of children by exploring the linkages between research, policy, and practice.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2410 or permission of the instructor

3620 FAMILY VIOLENCE
This course will examine the history and various definitions and theories used in investigating the problem of family violence across the life span (i.e. children in abusive families, dating violence, intimate partner violence, the abuse of older adults). Emphasis will be placed on violence against women and violence in diverse family forms. A particular emphasis will be placed on examining strategies for the prevention of family violence over the life course.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2420 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

3810 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE WITH CHILDREN AND FAMILIES
This course is designed to inform students of the range of professional practice issues confronted by helping professionals working with children, youth, adults and their families. The complexities of working with diverse populations with regard to professional ethics, standards of practice and advocacy are examined. Additional topics include: managing the field placement experience, professional roles, peer learning, reflective practice and portfolio development. Students gain experience in areas of professional practice with children, youth, adults of all ages, and their families through a field placement experience.
PREREQUISITE: Third year standing in Family Science or Child and Family Studies
Three lecture hours for first 4 weeks; for balance of semester, 1 lecture hour per week and 32 hours field placement.

3820 PROGRAM PLANNING AND EVALUATION
In this course, students develop competency in planning, implementing, and evaluating programs for health promotion and family education. Topics include theories and models commonly used for program planning and behaviour change, assessing needs, selecting appropriate intervention strategies, identification and allocation of resources, the marketing process, and evaluation models and design.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 3810 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours per week and the development, implementation and evaluation of a program.

3830 ISSUES IN FAMILY LAW AND SOCIAL POLICY
This course is a study of how public policy shapes the context in which families live, and, in turn, influences human and family development. Topics include the relationship between family functioning and public policies at the local, provincial, and federal levels; the influence of demographic changes, values, attitudes, and perceptions of the well-being of children and families on public policy debates; the effectiveness of policies and programs from a family perspective; the policy making process; and the different roles professionals play in influencing policy development. Special attention is given to the consequences of various policies on current family issues.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2420 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

3840 WOMEN, ECONOMICS AND THE ECONOMY
(See Economics 3810).

3950 GENDER AND VIOLENCE
(See Psychology 3950).

4090 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Family Science at the 4000 level.

4110 FIELD PLACEMENT I
This course provides an opportunity for students to integrate theory into practice through practical use of the knowledge and skills acquired in the classroom. Students participate in service provision at a community agency where they will test their attitudes and abilities to work with people, grow in self- awareness, as well as learn and develop helping and administrative skills. Through observation, practice, and reflection, students study and write about family science and professional practice issues relevant to their field placement.
PREREQUISITES: Family Science 3810, 3820 and fourth year standing in Family Science or Child and Family Studies.
Two lecture hours per week and 80 hours of field placement

4120 FIELD PLACEMENT II
This course is a continuation of Family Science 4110 and provides an opportunity for students to integrate theory into practice through practical use of the knowledge and skills acquired in the classroom. Students participate in service provision at a community agency where they will test their attitudes and abilities to work with people, grow in self-awareness, as well as learn and develop helping and administrative skills. Through observation, practice, and reflection, students study and write about family science and professional practice issues relevant to their field placement.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 4110
Two lecture hours per week and 80 hours of field placement

4310 EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE IN THE HEALTH SCIENCES
(See Foods & Nutrition 4310).

4400 SENIOR UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECT
This course allows senior students majoring in Family Science to carry out a full-year research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Entry to this course is contingent upon the student finding a departmental faculty member willing to supervise the research and permission of the department.
PREREQUISITE: Fourth year standing in the Family Science or Child and Family Studies programs
Six semester hours of credit

4410/4420 DIRECTED STUDIES IN FAMILY SCIENCE
(See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)

4510 WOMEN AND AGING
This course examines older women’s diverse experiences in today’s families and in the world as homemakers, wives/partners, mothers, caregivers, and as paid and unpaid workers. Family studies scholarship is examined critically for various themes such as the social construction of gender and validation of family diversity. The contradictory nature of the family as source of venue for control and oppression versus support, validation, and empowerment is also explored.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 4510
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2420 or at least one introductory Diversity and Social Justice Studies course
Three lecture hours

4710 PARENT-CHILD INTERACTION
This course is a study of the developmental nature of parenting throughout the life cycle from birth through aging, with emphasis on the reciprocal nature of parent-child interactions. It includes parenting in various family structures, in various lifestyles, in high-risk families, in families with exceptional children, and in families from diverse cultures. Alternative approaches to parenting (e.g. adoption and assisted reproduction) are discussed. Contemporary strategies for parent guidance and education are introduced.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science/Kinesiology 2410
Three lecture hours

4910 HUMAN SEXUALITY
This course is an examination of the psychological, social, and physiological aspects of sexual development throughout life. Aspects of human sexuality including reproduction, influence on relationships, gender issues, sexual orientation, sexually transmitted diseases, sexual values and decision-making are covered. Students examine current sexuality education methodologies. Implications for future trends in human interaction are analyzed.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2420 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

FOODS AND NUTRITION COURSES

1010 CONCEPTS AND CONTROVERSIES IN NUTRITION
This course introduces students to the science of nutrition through an exploration of contemporary issues relevant to nutrition and health. Emphasis will be placed on health promotion and disease prevention using an evidence-based approach to understand and evaluate current nutrition controversies.
Three lecture hours

1020 NUTRITION FOR NURSING PRACTICE
This course is an introduction to the science of nutrition specifically designed for nursing students. Topics discussed include: the nutrients, role of these nutrients in chronic disease prevention, diet therapy for specific disease conditions, nutritional needs across the lifespan and the selection of a healthy diet.
PREREQUISITE: Biology 1210
COREQUISITE: Biology 1220
Three lecture hours
NOTE: Credit will NOT be allowed for F-N 1020 if a student has already received credit for F-N 1010.

1110 INTRODUCTORY FOODS
This course is a study of the physical, chemical, and nutritive properties of food; the changes that occur during food preparation, storage, and handling; the factors affecting food acceptability and quality.
Three lecture hours, three-hour laboratory

2110 INTRODUCTORY NUTRITION I
This course is a study of applied human nutrition with a focus on carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and select micronutrients; requirements and food sources of these nutrients and their role in chronic disease prevention; digestion, absorption and metabolism; and assessment of nutritional status.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120, or permission of instructor
Three lecture hours

2120 INTRODUCTORY NUTRITION II
This course is a continuation of FN 2110 with a focus on water, major minerals and trace minerals; requirements and food sources of these nutrients; role of these nutrients in chronic disease prevention; nutritional needs across the lifespan, and the selection of an adequate diet.
PREREQUISITE: Foods and Nutrition 2110 or permission of instructor
Three lecture hours

2230 DETERMINANTS OF DIETARY BEHAVIOUR
This course studies the factors influencing human dietary behaviour and ultimately nutritional health. Topics include the food system, development of food preferences, food and culture, school food issues, food insecurity, food and the media, and sensory influences on dietary behaviour.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 1010 or 2110 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

2310 FOOD AND CULTURAL STUDIES
(See Diversity and Social Justice Studies 2120)

2610 COMMUNICATIONS
(See Family Science/Kinesiology 2610)

3020 ADVANCED FOODS
This course is an advanced study of the physical, chemical, and biological properties of foods through food experimentation; objective and subjective testing of food attributes with emphasis on sensory analysis; and principles of research methodology as applied to foods. Current trends are discussed. A product development project is required.
PREREQUISITES: Chemistry 1120, Foods and Nutrition 1110, and Foods and Nutrition/Family Science 3310 or permission of instructor
Three lecture hours, three-hour laboratory

3090 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Foods and Nutrition at the 3000 level.

3210 FOOD SERVICE SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT
This course is a study of food service management with emphasis on concepts and theories of organizational behaviour; safety, sanitation and hygienic practices in food service; quality and cost control; personnel management, staffing, physical design and delivery systems and the process of management in an institutional setting and in other food service operations. Other topics include menu planning, marketing, management information systems, budgeting, and the role of computers in food service management.
PREREQUISITE: Foods and Nutrition 1110 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

3310 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS
(See Family Science/Kinesiology 3310)

3510 NUTRITIONAL ASSESSMENT
This course is an advanced study of current issues in nutrition assessment. Topics include dietary, anthropometric, laboratory and clinical methods currently in use to assess nutritional status at the population and individual level; challenges in interpreting nutritional assessment data; and nutrition counselling.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 2120 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

3520 CLINICAL NUTRITION I
This course introduces the nutrition care process and the fundamentals of the pathophysiology andnutritional management of chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and disorders of energy balance. Monitoring of nutritional status, the development, implementation, and evaluation of nutrition careplans, medical terminology and drug-nutrient interactions are also discussed.
PREREQUISITE: Foods and Nutrition 3510 and Biology 1220
Three lecture hours

3710 LIFESPAN NUTRITION
This course builds on Introductory Nutrition by exploring in depth the nutritional foundations necessary for growth, development, normal functioning, and disease prevention at various stages of the life cycle. The impact of nutritional deficiencies and excesses on the body at various life stages will also be studied.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 1010 or 1020 or 2110, or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours

3750 NUTRITION FOR FITNESS & SPORT
(See Kinesiology 3750)

3820 PROGRAM PLANNING AND EVALUATION
In this course, students develop competency in planning, implementing, and evaluating programs for health promotion and family education. Topics include theories and models commonly used for program planning and behaviour change, assessing needs, selecting appropriate intervention strategies, identification and allocation of resources, the marketing process, and evaluation models and design.
Cross-listed with Kinesiology 3820
PREREQUISITES:  Foods and Nutrition 2120 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours and the development, implementation and evaluation of a program.

3830 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE IN DIETETICS
This course is designed to prepare students for a career in dietetic practice. Students will be introduced to the Integrated Competencies for Dietetic Education and Practice (ICDEP) and develop a professional portfolio which will demonstrate achievement of professional competencies. Topics include: career planning, federal/provincial/territorial requirements for dietetic practice, reflective practice, professional ethics, standards of practice, and professional boundaries.
PREREQUISITE: Students must be a third year Foods and Nutrition major intending to enter the field of dietetics
Three lecture hours

4010 ETHICAL ISSUES IN FITNESS & HEALTH
(See Kinesiology 4010)

4090 SPECIAL TOPIC
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Foods and Nutrition at the 4000 level.

4120 HUMAN METABOLISM
This course is an advanced study of the role of macronutrients in physiological and biochemical processes, their regulation in the human body, and their involvement in human health and disease. Application of current nutrition research findings and the rationale for current recommendations will also be discussed.
PREREQUISITES: Biology 1220, Statistics 1210, Chemistry 3530, and Foods and Nutrition 2120 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

4220 QUANTITY FOOD PRODUCTION
This course is a study of food service production and management. Topics include quantity food purchasing and preparation, food safety and HACCP, sanitation, human resource planning and supervision. Practical experience in quantity food production and food service administration is gained by running a food catering operation using a team approach to management.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 3210
Two lecture hours, six hours laboratory

4310 EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE IN THE HEALTH SCIENCES
This course focuses on the development of skills and knowledge required to find, appraise, use and communicate evidence in the health sciences. It provides students with the opportunity for the continued development of reasoning and decision making skills allowing them to integrate research evidence and critical thinking into professional practice.
Cross-listed with Family Science/Kinesiology 4310.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science/Foods and Nutrition/Kinesiology 3310 or permission of the instructor

4340 COMMUNITY NUTRITION
This course is an introduction to the field of community nutrition, which is the study of the prevention of nutritional problems and the promotion of health through organized com- munity efforts. Students develop an increased awareness of the theory and practice of community nutrition, including how it fits within the population health framework. Topics include nutrition programs and policies at the provincial, national, and international levels; food insecurity; and working with diversity.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition/Family Science/Kinesiology 3820 or permission of instructor
Three lecture hours

4400 SENIOR UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECT
This course allows senior students majoring in Foods and Nutrition to carry out a full-year research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Entry into this course is contingent upon the student finding a departmental faculty member willing to supervise the research and permission of the department.
PREREQUISITE: Fourth year standing in the Foods and Nutrition program
Six semester hours of credit

4410/4420 DIRECTED STUDIES IN FOODS AND NUTRITION
(See Academic Regulation 9 for regulations Governing Directed Studies.)

4610 CLINICAL NUTRITION II
This course is a continuation of Foods and Nutrition 3520 with emphasis on the pathophysiology and nutritional management of disease states that are typically treated in a tertiary care setting such as liver and gallbladder diseases, renal system diseases and diseases of the hematological, neurological, and respiratory systems. Additional topics such as specialized nutrition support, metabolic stress and disorders, neoplastic disease, HIV and AIDS will also be discussed.
Three lecture hours and 1 hour tutorial

4720 CURRENT ISSUES IN NUTRITION
This course is an advanced study of current issues in nutrition research. Students use independent research and problem- solving skills to critique literature, present seminars, and write a scientific paper.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 2120, or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

4900 ADVANCED RESEARCH AND THESIS
The objective of this course is to provide research experience for the student who intends to take up further studies at a post graduate level or who is planning on entering a career where research experience in foods and nutrition would be an asset. Students are provided with the opportunity to design, carry out, evaluate and write up a research project in an approved scientific format, while working under the direction of an advisor. Some of this work may be carried out in the summer months.
PREREQUISITE: Acceptance to the Honours Program
12 semester hours of credit

KINESIOLOGY COURSES

Please note: Kinesiology 1010 is an introductory course required for, but not restricted to, Kinesiology majors. A grade of at least 60% in Kinesiology is a prerequisite for all Kinesiology courses above the 1000 level.

1010 INTRODUCTION TO KINESIOLOGY
This course will provide students with an introduction to the study of human movement, and explore the physical, social, and psychological aspects of development as they relate to physical activity. Topics include: exercise physiology, biomechanics, sport psychology, sport sociology and exercise psychology.
PREREQUISITE: None
Three hours a week

2020 INTRODUCTION TO SPORT & EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY
The purpose of this course is to provide insight into the theories, subject matter, and empirical research concerning the psychological processes that influence performance in sports, exercise, and other physical activities.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 1010, Psychology 102 0 and admission to BSc Kinesiology program
Three hours a week

2210 INTRODUCTION TO EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY
This course discusses the physiological response to exercise, examining both acute and chronic adaptations to an exercise stress. Discussed from a physiological systems perspective, this course will examine the functional capacity of individual physiological systems, including the muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, and nervous systems, and discuss the system’s response to submaximal and maximal exercise and its impact on human performance. The environmental impact on physical performance will also be discussed.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 1010, Biology 1220 and admission to the BSc Kinesiology program.
Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory

2320 INTRODUCTION TO MOTOR LEARNING AND CONTROL
This course will introduce students to the basic principles of motor behaviour and motor control. Included will be considerations of the physical changes during growth and motor developmental while considering the role of feedback and practice on skilled behaviour.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 1010, Biology 1220 and admission to BSc Kinesiology program
Three hours a week

2410 HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
(See Family Science 2410).
NOTE: Credit will not be allowed for Family Science/Kinesiology 2410 if a student has already received credit for Psychology 2010.

2510 ANATOMICAL KINESIOLOGY
This course introduces kinesiology students to the science of human movement with special consideration given to skeletal, muscular and neural contributions. Topics include: anatomical directional terminology; basic biomechanical factors and concepts; muscular analysis of trunk, upper/lower extremities with reference to sport performance/technique/training; and neuromuscular fundamentals.
PREREQUISITE: Biology 1220 and admission to BSc Kinesiology program
Three lecture hours

2620 INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIOLOGY OF SPORT AND EXERCISE
This course will explore the significance of sport across society and culture. Students will gain an understanding of the role of sport in culture and how sport is structured within society. Different sociological theories will be presented and discussed throughout the class to explain the intersection of sport and society.
Cross-listed with Sociology 2210
PREREQUISITES: Kinesiology 1010 and admission to the Kinesiology program, or Sociology 1010
Three lecture hours

3090 SPECIAL TOPICS
A course in which topics or issues are explored outside the core area.

3120 INTRODUCTION TO BIOMECHANICS
This course introduces kinesiology students to the biomechanical basis of fundamental human movement. Topics include: skeletal, muscular and neural considerations for movement; functional anatomy; and essential mechanics and mathematics for the analysis of human motion.
Cross-listed with Physics 2420
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 2210, Math 1120, Physics 1210 and admission to BSc Kinesiology program.  NOTE: Prerequisites for Physics 2420 – Kinesiology 1010 or Physics 1110 or Physics 1210; and Math 1120 or Math 1910/1920.
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

3310 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS
(See Family Science/Foods & Nutrition 3310).

3410 HUMAN MOTOR DEVELOPMENT
This course explores the physical and psychosocial growth of children and adolescents and how it relates to their development of motor skills. Topics such as locomotion, fine and gross motor skills, and sensory impact on development will be addressed. The reciprocal relationship between human development and their environments is emphasized.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 2320
Three lecture hours

3420 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND CHRONIC DISEASE EPIDEMIOLOGY
This course will explore the relationship between physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and chronic disease. Students will be introduced to epidemiological concepts as they relate to physical activity and chronic disease, and will discuss other important modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors that influence the prevention of common chronic diseases.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 2210, Kinesiology 3310
Three lecture hours

3430 PHYSIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT AND TRAINING
This course will equip students with theoretical concepts and applied experience regarding fitness assessment, physical activity prescription and client management. Content is tailored to focus on training with low-risk healthy adult populations with an emphasis on the relationships between physical activity, physical fitness, and various health-related outcomes.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 2210 and admission to BSc Kinesiology Program
Three lecture hours, three hours laboratory a week

3510 ETHICAL ISSUES IN FITNESS & HEALTH
This course explores philosophical issues related to fitness and health. Students will discuss and evaluate arguments focused on important ethical issues arising in practice.
Cross-listed with Foods & Nutrition 4010.
PREREQUISITE: Third year standing in Kinesiology or Foods & Nutrition, Kinesiology 2020 or Foods and Nutrition 2120
Three hours lecture a week

3520 CARE & PREVENTION OF ATHLETIC INJURIES
This course is an introduction to the prevention and recognition of injuries from accidents in athletic activities. Analysis of the incidence of these athletic injuries, assessment techniques and therapeutic aids, support methods, conditioning and reconditioning exercises are discussed.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 2210
Three hours lecture a week

3610 COMMUNICATIONS
(See Foods & Nutrition 2610).

3710 THE ECONOMICS OF SPORTS
(See Economics 3710).

3750 NUTRITION FOR FITNESS & SPORT
This course will focus on the role of nutrition in athletic performance and fitness. Topics include energy expenditure, macro- and micro-nutrients, hydration and dietary supplementation. Eating strategies for optimal performance and other current topics in sports nutrition will also be discussed.
Cross-listed with Foods & Nutrition 3750.
PREREQUISITE: Foods & Nutrition 2120
Three hours lecture a week

3820 PROGRAM PLANNING AND EVALUATION
In this course, students develop competency in planning, implementing, and evaluating programs for health promotion and family education. Topics include theories and models commonly used for program planning and behaviour change, assessing needs, selecting appropriate intervention strategies, identification and allocation of resources, the marketing process, and evaluation models and design.
Cross-listed with Foods & Nutrition 3820
PREREQUISITES: Kinesiology 2320 or permission of the instructor

4090 SPECIAL TOPICS
A course in which topics or issues are explored outside the core area.

4110/4120 FIELD PLACEMENT I/II
These courses provide students with the opportunity to integrate theory into practice in a variety of multidisciplinary environments. Students complete a combination of supervised and independent work experience, and share their experiences in the classroom.
PREREQUISITES: Kinesiology 3120, 3430, 3820 and permission of the Department Chair
Two lecture hours per week and 60 hours of field placement

4210 ERGONOMICS
This course will take an occupational biomechanics approach to ergonomics. This course will emphasize the knowledge and skills required to perform biomechanical analyses of workplace tasks, identify occupational ergonomic issues and use ergonomic assessment tools to modify physical demands to prevent work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs). Interdisciplinary approaches to human factors, the study of human-machine interfaces, will also be discussed. Skill development will be achieved through practical experiences.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 3120
Three lecture hours

4310 EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE IN THE HEALTH SCIENCES
(See Foods & Nutrition 4310).

4320 MOVEMENT DISORDERS
This course is a study of movement disorders associated with a range of special populations from healthy older adults to those with neurological, degenerative or developmental disorders. Students will be provided with hands-on experiences using state-of-the-art techniques in motion analysis to understand the kinematics, kinetics, and neural control of standing posture, stepping, walking, and other activities of daily living. The graduate component of the course will require students to lead a seminar, and prepare a research proposal related to the study of a specific movement disorder.
Cross-listed with Human Biology 8320
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 3120
Three lecture hours
NOTE: Credit not given for both KINE 4320 and HB 8320; responsibility for this course rests within the Department of Applied Human Sciences.

4330 PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF SPORT PERFORMANCE
This course integrates theory, research, and applied perspectives to the area of sport psychology. Discussions will focus on theoretical constructs related to sport performance and provide students with a broad understanding of how athletes mentally train to reach high levels of proficiency in sport. Mental skills such as imagery, positive self-talk, goal setting, and other psychological skills will be introduced.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 2020
Three semester hours of credit

4350 PRINCIPLES OF POSITIVE YOUTH DEVELOPMENT THROUGH SPORT
This course will explore the different aspects related to positive youth development through sport and investigate the most current research available to understand how positive experiences in sport can be achieved. Topics that will be addressed in the course include, but are not limited to, the multiple definitions of positive development in sport (life skills, developmental assets, 5 Cs, initiative), sport as a vehicle for positive development, and characteristics associated with a positive sport environment.The graduate component of the course will require students to lead a number of seminars throughout the semester, write a reflective journal, and prepare a grant application related to a topic of interest within the area of positive youth development.
Cross-listed with Human Biology 8350
PREREQUISITES AND/OR CO-REQUISITES: Kinesiology 2020; Graduate students need permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

4400 SENIOR UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECT
This course allows senior students majoring in Kinesiology to carry out a full-year research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Entry to this course is contingent upon the student finding a departmental faculty member willing to supervise the research and permission of the department.
PREREQUISITE: Fourth-year standing in the Kinesiology program
Six semester hours of credit

4420 DIRECTED STUDIES IN KINESIOLOGY
These courses may be offered at the discretion of the department to advanced students. Conditions under which they are offered and entry will be subject to the approval of the Chair of the Department and the Dean of Science.
(See Academic Regulation 9 for rules governing Directed Studies.)

4430 ADVANCED PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE ADAPTION AND PERFORMANCE
This course focuses on factors governing chronic exercise adaptations, acute exercise performance and health. Course content explores concepts such as skeletal muscle repair, genetics of sport performance and the effects of various training modalities (HIIT, resistance etc.). Students will combine theoretical background with applied learning experiences in advanced fitness appraisal methods and techniques.
Cross-listed with Human Biology 8430
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 2210 and Biology 1310
Three lecture hours

4520 AGING: BIOLOGICAL & LIFESTYLE PERSPECTIVES
This course is an examination of the physiological changes that occur within the major organ systems (skeletal, muscular, neural, and cardiovascular) with normal human aging. The role of physical activity and nutrition to promote physiological function and quality of life as we age is emphasized. This course includes an examination of current biological theories of aging.
Cross-listed with Foods & Nutrition 4520
PREREQUISITE: Biology 1220 and Foods & Nutrition 2120
Three semester hours of credit

4720 NEURAL CONTROL OF MOVEMENT
The aim of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the neural signaling, sensory processing, and nervous system pathways involved in human movement. Topics include nerve cell properties, functions of the proprioceptive, visual, and vestibular systems, as well as spinal circuits, descending pathways, and supraspinal contributions to movement. Course content will be applied to further student’s understanding of movement-related neuropathologies.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 2320
Three semester hours of credit

4810 ANALYSIS OF HUMAN MOVEMENT
This course is a continuation of Kinesiology 3120 and provides students with in-depth case studies of how physics concepts explain the optimal biomechanics for fundamental human movements and sports activities.
Cross-listed with Physics 3510
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 3120. Note: Prerequisite for Physics 3510 – Physics 2420
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week


4900 ADVANCED RESEARCH AND THESIS
The objective of this course is to provide research experience for the student who intends to take up further studies at a post graduate level or who is planning on entering a career where research experience in Kinesiology would be an asset. Students are provided with the opportunity to design, carry out, evaluate and write up a research project in an approved scientific format, while working under the direction of an advisor.
PREREQUISITE: Acceptance to the Honours Program
12 semester hours of credit

Arts Seminars

Co-ordinator: Philip Smith

First-year students seeking the challenge of in-depth examination of a theme in the humanities and social sciences, and enhancement of academic reading, writing, thinking, and oral presentation skills in a supportive seminar environment, are invited to consider enrolling in Arts 1010. These first-year seminars are led by selected third- and fourth-year students who are well prepared in the content area and with skills in seminar leadership. Both Arts 1010 and Arts 4000 are graded on a pass/fail basis.

1010 FIRST-YEAR ARTS SEMINAR
In this course, first-year students explore a theme in the humanities and social sciences in seminars led by pairs of selected third- or fourth-year Arts students. Theme topics vary from section to section of the course and are available on the University website and from the Co-ordinator. Multiple opportunities are presented for careful reading, participation in class discussions, oral presentations, and written work.
Enrolment is limited to a maximum of 14 students to enhance prospects for full engagement in the academic content of the seminar, in development of academic skills, and in community-building.
PREREQUISITE: Permission of the Co-ordinator
Three hours a week; Three semester hours of credit

1050 BIG IDEAS IN ARTS
Taught by faculty members from across the Faculty of Arts, this course offers students the opportunity to explore topics and controversies that define our contemporary world. Students will learn about and draw upon various fields of study within the Faculty of Arts. The instructors will determine the focus for each course, for example utopias and dystopias, prisons and prisoners, revolutions, travel and migration, sports and entertainment, science fiction/science fact, social media, celebrities and scandals, environmental challenges, good courts and famines, love and labour, religious faith and scientific knowledge, money and power, the future of work and play.
Limited to first-year Arts students and an enrolment of twenty-five.
Three semester hours of credit

4000 LEADING A FIRST-YEAR ARTS SEMINAR
In this course, pairs of selected third- or fourth-year students lead seminars for first-year students, exploring a theme in the humanities and social sciences. Seminar leaders propose to the Co-ordinator a theme for their semester-long seminar; develop, with appropriate faculty consultation, a proposed seminar syllabus, including reading lists, assignments, and class activities; lead a first-year seminar of 12 to 14 students; provide feedback on assignments; and assign a grade to students. Seminar leaders participate in workshops prior to the first semester, and, during the first semester, in a one-hour-per-week seminar with other student leaders and a faculty member, to address integration and analysis of the subject matter under consideration and to develop pedagogical skills in seminar design, active learning, responding to oral and written presentations, and shaping the classroom environment.
PREREQUISITE: Third-or fourth-year standing in Arts and permission of the instructor
Three-hour seminar a week
Six semester hours of credit

4010 CAPSTONE IN ARTS
This course for graduating Arts students examines the principles, purpose, and history of a liberal arts education. Students examine the place of the liberal arts outside the university setting and complete a career portfolio.
Cross-listed with English 4010
PREREQUISITES: Fourth-year standing in Arts or permission of the instructor

Asian Studies

Co-ordinator:  Edward Y. J. Chung

Asia is the home of the most ancient and longest-lived civilizations the world has witnessed and of most of the world’s present population. Moreover, recent history would be impossible to write without frequent reference to Asia. Many of the momentous events of modern times can be evoked by the names of Asian countries: Japan, China, Israel, India, Pakistan, Korea, Vietnam, Afghanistan, Iran, and Iraq. The resolution of many of today’s pressing issues requires an understanding of the needs and interests of the Asian peoples.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN ASIAN STUDIES

A minor in Asian Studies consists of twenty-one (21) semester hours of credit taken from the list of approved courses. Either Asian Studies 2010 or 2020 is compulsory for the Minor. At least three semester hours of credit must be taken from any two of the four groups of Asian Studies electives. Students must take at least six semester hours of elective credit outside of their major area of study.

ASIAN STUDIES CORE COURSES

2010 INTRODUCTION TO WEST ASIA
This course is an historical introduction to the peoples and cultures of West Asia. It explores the major cultural, intellectual, institutional, social, and religious features of the Middle East, central Asia, and the Indian subcontinent, covering each region’s traditions and historical development. The course also deals with modernization and the impact of Western ideas, values, and institutions on modern West Asia. This is a required course for the Minor in Asian Studies.
Cross-listed with History 2910
Three hours a week

2020 INTRODUCTION TO EAST ASIA
This course is an historical introduction to the peoples and cultures of East Asia. It explores the major cultural, intellectual, institutional, social, and religious features of China, Japan, and Korea, covering each region’s traditions and modern developments. This course also introduces Taiwan, Hong Kong, and the impact of Western ideas and institutions on modern East Asia. This is a required course for the Minor in Asian Studies.
Cross-listed with History 2920
Three hours a week

2090 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Asian Studies at the 2000 level.

3090 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Asian Studies at the 3000 level.

4090 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Asian Studies at the 4000 level.

4510-4520 DIRECTED STUDIES
These courses may be offered to meet particular student needs or take advantage of special faculty expertise.
Three hours a week per course

NOTE: Directed Studies courses from other disciplines with an Asian focus may be accepted for credit towards the Minor with the approval of the Co-ordinator of Asian Studies. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)

ASIAN LANGUAGE COURSES

1010 INTRODUCTION TO [A SELECTED LANGUAGE] I
This course is intended for students with no proficiency in the language. This course provides an introduction to the language in question, through the study of pronunciation, vocabulary and grammar. It includes numerous oral drills, frequent written exercises, short oral presentations and simple readings.
Cross-listed with Modern Language 1010
Three hours a week

1020 INTRODUCTION TO [A SELECTED LANGUAGE] II
This course is a continuation of 1010. It provides further study of vocabulary and grammar and introduces aspects of civilization.
Cross-listed with Modern Languages 1020
Three hours a week

ASIAN STUDIES ELECTIVES
Language Courses (see above 1010 and 1020)
Peoples and Cultures
Sociology/Anthropology 2120 – Peoples of South Asia

Religion and the Arts
Religious Studies 2210 – Buddhism East and West
Religious Studies 2420 – The Hindu Religious Tradition
Religious Studies 2510 – Japanese Religion and Culture
Religious Studies 2610 – Religion and Philosophy in China
Religious Studies 3210 – Women in Eastern Religions

History and Politics
Political Science 3430 – Comparative Politics of South Asia
Political Science 3630 – Comparative Politics of the Middle East

PREREQUISITES: The Departments of Political Science, Religious Studies, and Sociology/Anthropology accept Asian Studies 2010/2020 as substitute prerequisites for any of their courses on this list.

Biology

Biology Faculty
Donna Giberson, Professor Emerita
Kevin L. Teather, Associate Professor, Chair
Robert Hurta, Professor
Christian R. Lacroix, Professor
Marva I. Sweeney-Nixon, Professor
Michael R. van den Heuvel, Professor
Lawrence R. Hale, Associate Professor
Pedro Quijon, Associate Professor
Marina B. Silva-Opps, Associate Professor
H. Carolyn Peach Brown, Assistant Professor
Patrick J. Murphy, Assistant Professor
P. Joel Ross, Assistant Professor
Stevan Springer, Assistant Professor
Denis Barabé, Adjunct Professor
David Cairns, Adjunct Professor
Adam Fenech, Adjunct Professor
Bourlaye Fofana, Adjunct Professor
Natacha Hogan, Adjunct Professor
Xiang Li, Adjunct Professor
Jason McCallum, Adjunct Professor
Aaron Mills, Adjunct Professor
Rick Peters, Adjunct Professor
Gerhard Pohle, Adjunct Professor
Russell Wyeth, Adjunct Professor

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN BIOLOGY
A student enrolled in the Majors program in Biology will complete a minimum of 42 semester hours in Biology, and additional courses in Science according to the program outlined below. Students may choose to take a general Biology degree or to obtain a Life Sciences or Environmental Biology specialization. Students in the ‘pre-vet’ program should follow the Life Sciences specialization, and may select courses of interest in animal biology or other areas.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION
Students may apply for a particular specialization any time before the end of their third year. Those that have not specified a specialization must meet the requirements for the General Biology Stream. The Life Sciences specialization may be of interest to students who intend to pursue careers or graduate studies related to veterinary medicine (‘pre-vet’), human health professions, or research/innovation in biomedical or biotechnological sciences. The Environmental Biology specialization may be of interest to students interested in careers or graduate studies related to biodiversity and conservation, or wildlife biology in the modern context of climate change and human interactions. The General Biology stream will give students a broad background in biology, with good preparation for all areas of Modern Biology.

Refer to the Specializations for course structures of all biology major specializations.

Students may apply for a particular specialization any time before the end of their third year. Those that have not specified a specialization must meet the requirements for the General Biology Stream.

GENERAL BIOLOGY STREAM

Core Biology Courses Hours Credit
Biology 1310-1320 6
Two of Biology 2020, 2040 and 2060 6
Two of Biology 2210, 2220 and 2230 6
Biology 3260 or 3520 or 3820 3
Biology 3310 3
at least six additional Biology electives that fit the following criteria (at least two must be at the 4000 level) 18

Required courses in other departments, and electives to total 120 semester hours of credit as listed below:

LIFE SCIENCES SPECIALIZATION (including Pre-Veterinary Medicine Stream)

Core Biology Courses Hours Credit
Biology 1020 or 1030 3
Biology 1310-1320 6
Biology 2040 and 2060 6
Biology 2210 and either 2230 or 2240 6
Foods and Nutrition 2110 or Physics 2430 3
Biology 3260 3
Biology 3310 3
Biology 3520 or Physics 3520 3
At least five additional Biology electives at or above the 2000 level that fit the following criteria:
at least two must be at the 4000 level and be from Life Sciences;
at least an additional two must be selected from the Life Specialization list;
at least one must be selected from the Environmental or General Biology lists
15

Required courses in other departments, and electives to total 120 semester hours of credit as below:

ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY SPECIALIZATION
Core Courses
Environmental Studies 1010
Biology 1310-1320
Biology 2020, 2040 and 2060
Biology 2220 and 2230
Biology 3310
Biology 3820
at least six additional Biology electives at or above the 2000 level that fit the following criteria 18:
• at least two must be at the 4000 level and from the Environmental Biology list
• at least an additional two must be selected from the Environmental Biology Specialization list
• at least two must be selected from the Life Sciences or General Biology lists

Required courses in other departments, and electives to total 120 semester hours of credit as listed below:

REQUIRED COURSES FROM OTHER DEPARTMENTS
One of UPEI 1010, 1020, or 1030

Chemistry:
Chemistry 1110 and 1120
Chemistry 2410-2420 or Chemistry 2430 (credit will not be given for both Chemistry 2430 and Chemistry 2410 or 2420)
Chemistry 3530 or Biology 2250 is required for the General Stream and Life Sciences; Chemistry 3530 or 2020 is required for Environmental Biology

Physics:
Physics 1210 (or 1110) and Physics 1220 (or 1120)

Mathematics and Statistics:
Math 1120 or Math 1910
Stat 1210
Note: Some students may wish to take upper level Mathematics, Chemistry, or Physics courses for which Mathematics 1910-1920 is required: therefore Mathematics 1910-1920 may be taken in place of Mathematics 1120 but the statistics requirement of Statistics 1210 remains. Credit will not be given for both Mathematics 1120 and Mathematics 1910.

Other electives:
The remaining number of semester hours required to complete the requirements for the Biology major (a total of 120 semester hours) will be made up from courses selected by the students.

Note: Please see Academic Regulation 14(3): Application of Certain Professional Courses.

SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCES

First Year
Introductory Biology (BIO 1310-1320)
Introductory Chemistry (CHEM 1110-1120)
Calculus (MATH 1120 or 1910)
Statistics (STAT 1210)
Physics for the Life Sciences (PHYS 1210 and 1220)
One of UPEI 1010, 1020, or 1030
Introductory Environmental Studies (ENV 1010) or a human or animal health course (BIO 1020 or 1030) or Electives

Second Year
Biodiversity courses (BIO 2020, 2040, 2060)
Cell and Molecular Biology and/or Ecology and/or Genetics (BIO 2210, 2220, 2230, 2240)
Organic Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry or Biochemistry (CHEM 2410-2420 or 2430; CHEM 2020; CHEM 3530 or BIO 2250)
Nutrition 2210 or Physics 2430. Students interested in a Medical and biological Physics minor should take Physics 2220, Modern Physics for Life Sciences [can also be taken in third year]
Electives (to make up 30 hours of credit)

Third Year
Core physiology or evolution (BIO 3260 or 3820)
Research Methods and Communications (BIO 3310)
Molecular Biology Research Techniques (BIO 3520) or Biomedical Imaging (PHYS 3520) [can also be taken in fourth year]
*Biology electives (2000 level or above) as indicated above for your specialization
Electives (to make up 30 hours of credit)

Fourth Year
Two Biology electives at 4000 level from the required specialization
Electives (to make up 30 hours of credit)

List of Courses that may be used towards the specialization areas in Biology:
– Courses in the “General Biology” section may be used as “alternate electives” in any specialization
– Certain Biology 4410 (Directed studies) or 4420 (Special Topics) courses, or courses transferred from other universities for Biology credit, may be credited to one specialization or the other with prior permission of the Chair.
– Courses that are required components for one specialization or the other (e.g. Biology 2210 and 3260 for the Life Sciences specialization; Biology 2220 and 3820 in the Environmental Biology specialization can be counted as “alternate” electives for the other specialization. Bio 2020, 2040 and 2060 may also be counted as alternate electives when not used to satisfy core requirements for either specialization in the second year.

Elective courses in the Life Sciences Specialization
*Biology 2260—Human Anatomy and Histology
Physics 2430—Physics of the Human Body
*Biology 3110—Plants and People
Biology 3750—Medical Microbiology
Biology 3220—Bioinformatics
*Biology 3230—Genetics II
*Biology 3040—Vertebrate Zoology
*Biology 3240—Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
*Biology 3350—Animal Behaviour
*Biology 3710—Life of Mammals
*Biology 4010—Human Physiology and Pathophysiology
*Biology 4020—Comparative & Environmental Vertebrate Physiology
*Biology 4030—Developmental Biology
*Biology 4040—Endocrinology
*Biology 4050—Medical Biology
Biology 4350—Biology of Sex
Biology 4710—Molecular Biotechnology
*Biology 4720—Biology of Cancer and Other Diseases
Biology 4750—Basic and Clinical Immunology
Paramedicine 4010—Social Determinants of Health
Foods and Nutrition 4520—Aging: Biological & Lifestyle Perspectives

For current admission requirements to the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine please refer to http://www.upei.ca/programsandcourses/professional-programs/doctor-veterinary-medicine

Elective courses in the Environmental Biology Specialization
*Biology 3040—Vertebrate Zoology
*Biology 3140—Plant Community Ecology
*Biology 3270—Field Coastal Ecology
*Biology 3350—Animal Behaviour
*Biology 3510—Ornithology
*Biology 3610—Biology of Fishes
*Biology 3660—Plant-Animal Interactions
*Biology 3710—Life of Mammals
*Biology 3910—Marine Biology
*Biology 4110—Wildlife Biology
*Biology 4130—Conservation Genetics
*Biology 4520—Biogeography and Macroecology
*Biology 4540—Biodiversity and Conservation Ecology
*Biology 4620—Watershed Ecology
*Biology 4650—Marine Community Ecology
*Biology 4850—Environmental Toxicology

Elective courses in the General Biology Program (can be used as “alternate” stream courses)
*Biology 2020—Botany
*Biology 2040—Zoology
*Biology 2060—Microbiology
Biology 3120—History of Biology
*Biology 3520—Molecular Biology Research Techniques
*Biology 4210—Design and Analysis of Biological Studies

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONOURS IN BIOLOGY
The Honours program in Biology is designed to provide research experience at the undergraduate level within the BSc program. It is available to students with a strong academic background who intend to continue studies at the postgraduate level in Biology or some related field, or to students who intend to pursue a career where research experience would be an asset. Students may also carry out a less intensive research project by registering for Biology 4400.

The Honours program differs from the BSc Major program in having a research and thesis component. The total number of courses is the same, five courses per semester for eight semesters, but the honours thesis course counts as 12 credits, so the total semester hours of credit for the Honours is 126, compared to 120 hours for the BSc Major. The research component is to be completed within the BSc program and would normally require the equivalent of one summer (four months) preceding the graduating year. Evaluation of the research data and writing of the thesis would normally be done during the fall and/or spring session in Biology 4900: Advanced Research and Thesis.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS OF THE HONOURS PROGRAM
Students may complete an Honours Degree in any of the three Biology streams (General, Life Sciences, and Environmental Biology). The program is the same as the Majors program with the addition of
Biology 4900 and two other Biology electives (taken from any stream). These would normally be completed in the student’s final year.

FOURTH YEAR: HONOURS BIOLOGY
*Two Biology electives at 4000 level (these must be in the Life Sciences or Environmental Biology lists if students have declared a specialty)
*Two additional Biology electives at the 2000 level or above
Biology 4900 (Advanced Research and Thesis)
2 Electives
* at least four of the required Biology electives must have a laboratory component in all streams.

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS
For admission to the Honours program or Honours Conversion program, students should have a combined minimum average of 75% in all previous courses taken in the second and third years of study; and a combined minimum average of 75% in all previous biology courses taken. Permission of the Department is also required and is contingent on the student finding a thesis advisor, on being assigned an advisory committee, on acceptance of the research project by the Biology Department, and on general acceptability. Students interested in doing Honours should consult with the Departmental Chair as early as possible and apply to the program no later than 31 March of the student’s third year.

PERFORMANCE
To graduate with a BSc Honours in Biology, students must complete 126 semester hours of credit which includes 12 semester hours of credit for the research and thesis, attain a minimum average of 75% in all Biology courses combined, and achieve a minimum overall average of 70% in all courses submitted for the degree. Students failing to meet these requirements may transfer their program to the BSc Biology Program or to other degree programs.

Note: Detailed information to students on the Honours Program is available from the Department.

CO-OP EDUCATION in BIOLOGY
The UPEI Co-op Program is an integrated approach to university education which enables students to alternate academic terms on campus with work terms in suitable employment. The success of such programs is founded on the principle that students are able to apply theoretical knowledge from course studies in the workplace and return to the classroom with practical workplace experience. Students who successfully complete all the requirements of the program will have the notation entered on their transcripts and on the graduation parchment.

Students accepted into the program complete at least three paid work terms of normally 14 weeks duration, and three professional development courses. Credits earned through completion of work terms are counted as general electives.

The Co-op option is available to full-time students in the Biology Major or Honours program.  Applications to the Co-op Education Program are normally made after completion of the first year of study.

See the Co-operative Education Program section of the UPEI Academic Calendar for more information.

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINOR IN BIOLOGY
To qualify for a minor, students must complete a total of 21 semester hours of credit in Biology, 6 semester hours of which are required courses.

The requirements for a minor in Biology are:
Biology 1310-1320 (6 hours of credit) and any 5 Biology electives at 2000 level or above (15 semester hours)
Total Semester Hours = 21

BACHELOR OF WILDLIFE CONSERVATION
This program combines the practical, theoretical and analytical strengths of courses provided by accredited NAWTA (North American Wildlife Technology Association) programs, and by the University of Prince Edward Island, for students interested in obtaining rigorous training in wildlife conservation. Foundational science courses (e.g. General Chemistry) as well as senior analytical courses in the environmental sciences at the university level (e.g. Biodiversity and Conservation Biology, Marine Biology) complement the strong field training acquired during the college diploma program.

Students graduating from an accredited NAWTA college with a minimum 70% average are eligible to apply to UPEI for formal entry into the Bachelor of Wildlife Conservation degree program. Entry to the program is restricted to September of each year and applications must be received by June 1st. Once accepted to UPEI, students will undertake a rigorous program of 20 courses, 15 of which will be required, with an additional 5 courses to be chosen from a list of acceptable electives. Students who are accepted to the program must be able to demonstrate that they have been immunized for the prevention of Rabies, or obtain a rabies vaccination during the first year of their program. Students are subject to all of the Academic Regulations of the University.

9 Core Biology courses:
Biology 1310—Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
Biology 2220—Ecology
Biology 3310—Research Methods and Communications in Biology
Biology 3820—Evolutionary Biology
Biology 3910—Marine Biology OR Biology 4620—Watershed Ecology
Biology 4130—Conservation Genetics
Biology 4150—Wildlife Health
Biology 4520—Biogeography and Macroecology OR Biology 4540—Biodiversity and Conservation Biology
Biology 4910—Wildlife Conservation and Environmental Management Practicum

7 Core Courses in Other Departments:
Environmental Studies 1010 – Introduction to Environmental Studies
Environmental Studies 2120 – Earth’s Physical Environment
Environmental Studies 4310 – Environmental Impact Assessment
Economics 1010 – Introductory Microeconomics
Economics 2110 – Introduction to Resource Economics
Economics 2150 – Environmental Economics
UPEI 1010 or UPEI 1020 or UPEI 1030

Students complete the degree requirements by choosing two science and two nonscience electives.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOTECHNOLOGY
This program combines practical and applied courses provided by the Bioscience Technology diploma program at Holland College with strong theoretical science courses at the University of Prince Edward Island. It is designed for students interested in obtaining a rigorous and broad training in biotechnology, such as gaining experience in research, laboratory procedures and safety, scientific ethics, and regulatory affairs, while increasing access to post-graduate opportunities (e.g. Master’s degree programs). Students are provided with foundational science courses as well as senior specialized courses in the life sciences at the university level to complement the strong hands-on technical training acquired during the college diploma program. On-the-job training is provided for all students.

There are two paths into this program, so students can either start at Holland College or UPEI, and end up with the same articulated degree. The technical lab-based content is covered at Holland College in the Bioscience Technology diploma program, either during the first two years of the degree (for students who start at Holland College; Path 1) or in year 3 (for students who start at UPEI; Path 2).

Path 1, starting at Holland College (‘2+2’):
If students have received a Bioscience Technology diploma and achieved a minimum 70% average at Holland College, they are eligible to apply to UPEI for formal entry into the BBT degree program. Once accepted to UPEI, students will undertake a rigorous program of 20 courses, 13 of which will be required, 3 will be upper level science electives, and 4 will be general electives. Once accepted, students are subject to all of the Academic Regulations of the University.

Path 2, starting at UPEI (‘2+1+1’):
Students apply to start at UPEI in the Faculty of Science directly out of high school, following standard application procedures at UPEI. Once accepted, students undertake one year of science courses similar to a first year biology or chemistry student (8 required courses, 2 electives). Then students apply to Holland College to do the Bioscience Technology diploma program by the deadline of May 1st. Once accepted, they complete their second year of science at UPEI (7 required courses, 3 electives), and then one full year at Holland College in the Bioscience Technology diploma program (includes 2 intersessions). Students then finish back at UPEI in their final year (4 required courses, 3 upper level science electives, 3 general electives).

For students who already have received a Bioscience Technology diploma, the recommended sequence of courses for the 2 years of Path 1 at UPEI is:

Year 1, Semester 1 at UPEI:
Chemistry 2430 – Organic Chemistry for Life Sciences
Chemistry 2210 – Analytical Chemistry
Mathematics 1120 – Calculus for the Managerial, Social, and Life Sciences
Physics 1210 – Physics for the Life Sciences I
One Humanities or General Elective

Year 1, Semester 2 at UPEI:
One of UPEI 1010 or 1020 or 1030
Biology 2210 – Cell Biology
Chemistry 3530 – Biochemistry
Physics 1220 – Physics for the Life Sciences II
One Humanities or General Elective

Year 2, Semester 1 at UPEI:
Biology 3260 – Introduction to Physiology of Cells and Organisms
Statistics 1210 – Introductory Statistics
One Science Elective at the 3000 level
One Science Elective at the 4000 level
One Humanities or General Elective

Year 2, Semester 2 at UPEI:
Biology 3220 – Introduction to Bioinformatics
Biology 4710 – Molecular Biotechnology
Chemistry 3220 – Analytical instrumentation
One Science Elective at the 3000 or 4000 level
One Humanities or General Elective

For students who have not received a Bioscience Technology diploma, the recommended sequence of courses for the 4 years of Path 2 is:

Year 1, Semester 1 at UPEI:
Biology 1310 – Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
Chemistry 1110 – General Chemistry I
Mathematics 1120 – Calculus for the Managerial, Social, and Life Sciences
Physics 1210 – Physics for the Life Sciences I
One Humanities or General Elective

Year 1, Semester 2 at UPEI:
Biology 1320 – Introduction to Organisms
Chemistry 1120 – General Chemistry II
Physics 1220 – Physics for the Life Sciences II
One of UPEI 1010 or 1020 or 1030
One Humanities or General Elective

Year 2, Semester 1 at UPEI:
Biology 2210 – Cell Biology
Chemistry 2430 – Organic Chemistry for Life Sciences
Statistics 1210  – Introductory Statistics
One Science Elective
One Humanities or General Elective

Year 2, Semester 2 at UPEI:
Biology 2060 – Microbiology
Biology 2230 – Genetics
Chemistry 2310 – Physical Chemistry I
Chemistry 3530 – Biochemistry
One Humanities or General Elective

Intersession between years 2 and 3 at Holland College:
Chemistry 1200 – Introduction to Chromatography
Biology 1310 – Immunology

Year 3, Semester 1 at Holland College:
Bios 2000 – Analytical Techniques in Bioscience
Bios 2100 – Industrial Bioproducts: Production and Purification
Biology 2300 – Cell Culturing
Biology 2310 – Molecular Biology
Mathematics 2000 – Calculus
Bios 2300 – Research Preparation: Bioscience Technology

Year 3, Semester 2 at Holland College:
Bios-2010 – Ethics and Professional Practice
Chemistry 2300 – Advanced Biochemistry
Bios-2050 – Research Project: Bioscience Technology

Intersession between years 3 and 4 at Holland College:
Bios 2310 – Research Project: Bioscience Technology

Year 4, Semester 1 at UPEI:
Biology 3260 – Introduction to Physiology of Cells and Organisms
One Science Elective at the 3000 level
One Science Elective at the 4000 level
Two General Electives

Year 4, Semester 2 at UPEI:
Biology 3220 – Introduction to Bioinformatics
Biology 4710 – Molecular Biotechnology
Chemistry 3220 – Analytical instrumentation
One Science Elective at the 3000 or 4000 level
One General Elective

BIOLOGY COURSES: (*Lab courses are indicated with an asterisk)

NOTES REGARDING 1000-LEVEL BIOLOGY COURSES

  • Biology 1310 and 1320 are Introductory Biology courses and are the prerequisites for upper level Biology courses. Take these courses if you plan to complete a Biology major or minor, or if your program requires one or both courses. Biology 1010 is not accepted for credit in the Biology Majors program.
  • Biology 1020 and 1030 are introductory courses for students in the Life Science specialization, but any student may take these courses.
  • Biology 1060 and 1220 are restricted to students enrolled in programs offered by the Faculty of Nursing and the Department of Applied Human Sciences.
  • A combined average of at least 60% is a prerequisite for all Biology courses above the 1000 level. However, this course prerequisite may also be met by the successful completion of a qualifying examination to be offered each year on the first Tuesday after Labour Day. This examination, which shall cover material from both Biology 1310 and 1320 is open to those who have passing grades for both Biology 1310 and 1320, but who do not have a combined average of at least 60%. To be admitted to Biology courses above the 1000 level, students must achieve a score of 65% on the qualifying examination. The score on the qualifying exam will not replace those attained in Biology 1310 and 1320, nor shall it be factored into any calculation of grades for graduation, scholarships or other purposes. This course prerequisite may also be waived with the permission of the Chair for individual courses.

0010 INTRODUCTION TO THE ESSENTIALS OF BIOLOGY
This is a non-credit course designed primarily for students needing an introduction to biological principles, as preparation for first year biology. Basic biological principles are introduced in relation to everyday applications, including industry and the environment. Topics include: components of cells, principles of metabolism, principles of genetics, principles of evolution and natural selection, plant and animal structure. Classes will be augmented by laboratory demonstrations. This course is required for those students planning to take Biology 1310 and/or 1320, and who did not take either Biology 11 or Biology 12 in high school.

1010 CURRENT ISSUES IN ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY
This course considers environmental problems from a biological perspective. Human ecology, populations, pollution, resource use and other topics are discussed critically.
Lectures and field trips to the equivalent of six hours a week

1020 HUMAN HEALTH
An introductory course dealing with the structure and function of the human body as the biological foundation of human health and disease. Course topics will include a survey of human organ systems and prevalent diseases of the adult human, introducing concepts of disease prevention and wellness.
Three hours lecture a week

1030 ANIMAL HEALTH
An introductory course dealing with current issues related to animal health and disease in a global context. Course topics will introduce causes of disease in animals and the principles of maintaining healthy animals, as well as an interdisciplinary overview of the role and importance of animal health in modern society.
Three hours lecture

1060 INTRODUCTORY MICROBIOLOGY FOR HEALTH SCIENCES
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts and principles of microbiology. The structure and function of the major groups—viruses, bacteria, fungi and protozoa—which affect human health, are studied. Topics include the process of disease transmission, immunology, physical and chemical methods of disease prevention and control, as well as major infectious diseases of the body systems.
PREREQUISITE: Registration in the Nursing or Foods and Nutrition programs or permission of the Chair
Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week
NOTE: Students will not get credit for both VPM 1010/BIO 1060 and BIO 2060.

1210 HUMAN ANATOMY
This course covers the structure of the human body from cells to tissues to organ systems.. The gross anatomy and histology of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, lymphatic, digestive, urinary and reproductive system of humans is surveyed.
Cross-listed with Biology 2260
Three hours lecture, 2.5 hours laboratory a week
NOTE: Students will not get credit for both Biology 1210 and Biology 2260

1220 HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY
This course deals with the functioning of the human body. The physiology of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems is surveyed.
PREREQUISITE: Restricted to students in the Nursing, Kinesiology, Foods and Nutrition, and Family Science programs
Three hours lecture, 2.5 hours laboratory a week

1230 ESSENTIALS OF HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY
This lecture-only course deals with the functioning of the human body and is designed for students applying to post-graduate health science degrees where a prerequisite human physiology course is required. The physiology of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems is surveyed.
Three hours lecture a week
NOTE: Students will not get credit for both BIO 1220 and BIO 1230

*1310 GENES, CELLS AND MACROMOLECULES
This course provides an introduction to the science of Biology, with emphasis on life processes at the cellular and molecular level. The course covers the cellular nature of life, the physical basis of heredity, development and the chemistry of life. Part of the laboratory component involves training in microscopy and molecular techniques.
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

*1320 ORGANISMS AND THEIR ENVIRONMENT
This course provides an introduction to the science of Biology, with emphasis on organismal biology and unifying themes. The course deals with evolution, the diversity of life, form and function, and ecology. Part of the laboratory component involves training in dissection techniques.
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

*2020 BOTANY
A survey of bacteria, fungi, algae, and major plant groups (bryophytes, vascular cryptogams and seed plants) emphasizing morphology, life histories and evolutionary relationships.
PREREQUISITE: A combined average of at least 60% in Biology 1310-1320
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

*2040 ZOOLOGY
A survey of the major groups of animals, beginning with the sponges and ending with the mammals. Topics emphasize evolutionary relationships, development, structure and function, and ecology. Laboratory work includes the study of selected representatives from each of the major groups.
PREREQUISITE: A combined average of at least 60% in Biology 1310-1320
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

*2060 MICROBIOLOGY
This course deals with basic microbial biology including discussion of industrial, ecological, environmental and medical microbiology, and other relevant topics. Laboratory sessions provide training in relevant microbiology techniques/approaches.
PREREQUISITE: A combined average of at least 60% in Biology 1310-1320 or permission of the instructor. Students registered in the Bachelor of Wildlife Conservation Program, Bachelor of Paramedicine Program, or students majoring in Foods & Nutrition may take this course after completion of Biology 1310
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week
NOTE: Additional lab time may be required outside of scheduled laboratory periods.

2090 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Biology at the 2000 level.

2210 CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
This course examines the structure and function of living cells. Topics include macromolecules, organelles, membranes, cellular energetics, cell signalling, gene expression, cell division, cell death and special topics in biomedical cell  and molecular biology.
PREREQUISITE: A combined average of at least 60% in Biology 1310-1320 or permission of the instructor. Students registered in the Bachelor of Wildlife Conservation Program, Bachelor of Paramedicine Program or students in Applied Human Sciences may take this course after completion of Biology 1310.
Three hours lecture, one hour tutorial a week

*2220 ECOLOGY
This course introduces and discusses the basic themes and concepts of Ecology. Students examine the hierarchy of Ecology by investigating individual organisms, populations, communities, and ecosystems. Topics covered in the course include: natural selection, energy flow, nutrient cycling, population growth, plant/animal interactions and biodiversity. The course involves reading and discussion of current and classical literature in the field. Laboratories will primarily consist of field investigations and analysis of field data.
PREREQUISITE: A combined average of at least 60% in Biology 1310-1320 or registration in the Bachelor of Wildlife Conservation program or permission of the instructor.
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

2230 GENETICS I
The principles of genetics are considered in a broad perspective. Topics include chromosome structure and behaviour, molecular biology and biochemistry of genes, DNA inheritance, recombination, replication and mutation, Mendelian inheritance, and inheritance of linked genes. There is a strong emphasis on problem solving, probability and statistics in tutorials.are simple Mendelian inheritance, genes as part of biochemical pathways, inheritance of linked genes, probability and statistics, DNA replication and mutation, chromosomal structure and behaviour, and recombinant DNA. There is a strong emphasis on problem solving, probability and statistics in tutorials.
PREREQUISITE: A combined average of at least 60% in Biology 1310-1320
Three hours lecture, one hour tutorial a week
NOTE: Biology majors and minors are expected to take BIO 2230. Students will not get credit for both BIO 2230 and BIO 2240.

2240 HUMAN GENETICS
The principles of genetics are considered in a broad perspective. Topics include chromosome structure and behaviour, molecular biology and biochemistry of genes, DNA replication and mutation, recombinant DNA, Mendelian inheritance, and inheritance of linked genes. There is a strong emphasis on human genetics in tutorials.
Cross-listed with Biology 2230
PREREQUISITE: Biology 1310
Three hours lecture, one hour tutorial a week
NOTE: Paramedicine majors are expected to take BIO 2240. Students will not get credit for both BIO 2230 and BIO 2240.

2250 HUMAN BIOCHEMISTRY
This course is an introduction to the major classes of biomolecules and their main metabolic pathways. Special attention is paid to biochemistry in the context of human metabolism, nutrition and disease.
PREREQUISITE: Biology 1310, Chemistry 1110
Three hours lecture a week
NOTE: Students will not get credit for both BIO-2250 and CHEM-3530.

*2260 HUMAN ANATOMY AND HISTOLOGY
This course covers the structure of the human body at both the macroscopic and microscopic levels and gives the student a thorough overview of human cells, tissues, organs and organ systems. While both anatomy and histology will be integrated throughout the course, lectures focus on gross anatomy while laboratories emphasize the structure of tissues (histology)in the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, lymphatic, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems.
Cross-listed with Biology 1210
PREREQUISITE: Biology 1310
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week
NOTE: Students will not get credit for both Biology 1210 and Biology 2260.

*3040 VERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY
This course focuses on the taxonomy and evolution of vertebrates. Coverage of taxonomic orders and families may include discussion of systematics, taxonomy, evolution, palaeontology, zoogeography, and unique morphological, physiological, ecological, and behavioural characteristics. The laboratory component is dedicated to learning basic vertebrate morphology and taxonomic relationships among and within vertebrate groups using preserved specimens and dissections.
PREREQUISITE: Biology 2040. Students registered in the Bachelor of Wildlife Conservation Program may take this course after completion of Biology 1310 and Biology 2220.
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

3090 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Biology at the 3000 level.

*3110 PLANTS AND PEOPLE
This course surveys in detail the major current uses of plants, their history, morphology, and chemistry. Laboratory periods consist of demonstrations of plant structures and products derived from plant sources, practical exercises, and field trips.
PREREQUISITE: Biology 2020
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

3120 HISTORY OF BIOLOGY
This course surveys the major advances in the biological sciences from prehistory to modern times. Emphasis is placed on the effect which past ideas have had on the evolution of Biology.
PREREQUISITE: A combined average of at least 60% in Biology 1310-1320 or department permission. Students registered in Bachelor of Wildlife Conservation Program may take this course after completion of Biology 1310.
Three hours lecture and one hour discussion group a week

*3140 PLANT COMMUNITY ECOLOGY
A study of algae, fungi and major plant groups such as bryophytes, vascular seedless and seed plants. Emphasis will be placed on identification of common species, plant taxonomy and ecology.
PREREQUISITE: Biology 2220
Three hours lecture; three to four hours laboratory a week, some of which consist of field trips

*3220 INTRODUCTION TO BIOINFORMATICS
(See Computer Science 3220)
NOTE: No student can be awarded more than one course credit among HB 8850, VPM 8850, CS 3220, and BIO 3220

*3230 GENETICS II
The principles of genetics at a more advanced level are considered in the context of practical laboratory investigation, on-line genetic data resources, and examination of current scholarly literature. Laboratory work will be conducted with fruit flies (Drosophila) and yeast (Saccharomyces), and will include molecular biological techniques.
PREREQUISITE: Biology 2230
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

*3240 COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY
This course builds upon some of the material presented in Biology 2040, providing students with a much more detailed look at the structure and function of various organs and organ systems of the vertebrate body. Dissections and display material are used during laboratories to allow students to compare and contrast these systems in representative vertebrates.
PREREQUISITE: Biology 2040. Students registered in the Bachelor of Wildlife Conservation Program may take this course after completion of Biology 1310 and Biology 2220.
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

*3260 INTRODUCTORY PHYSIOLOGY OF CELLS AND ORGANISMS
This course introduces students to basic themes and concepts in physiology. Students explore mechanisms underlying regulatory processes in cells, and the ways organisms function. Topics include feedback systems, signalling, membrane potentials, muscle and nerve function, endocrine, cardiopulmonary and osmoregulatory form and function in animals, carbohydrate synthesis and transport in plants, and plant responses to stress.
PREREQUISITES: Biology 2210 and six semester hours of core Biology courses at the 2000 level
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

*3270 FIELD COASTAL ECOLOGY
Field coastal ecology is an intensive field-oriented course designed to provide 3rd-4th year students of the Biology program with knowledge and experience surveying and monitoring the organisms and habitats best represented in coastal Prince Edward Island. Using a hands-on approach, students are expected to learn and apply the sampling protocols that are most useful to each type of habitat. Although the course will have a broad theoretical component (early daily lectures on community types and sampling design), its main focus will be on activities to be developed in the field and subsequently in the laboratory. These activities include sampling, processing, and identification or organisms collected in the most typical benthic habitats of the island.
PREREQUISITES: Biology 2020, 2040 and 2220. Students registered in Bachelor of Wildlife Conservation Program may take this course after completion of Bio 1310 and Bio 2220.
Four hours lecture, four hours laboratory/field trips per day for two weeks (summer intensive course)

*3310 RESEARCH METHODS AND COMMUNICATIONS IN BIOLOGY
This course is an introduction to research methods and the basic principles of scientific communication, as expressed in the Biological Sciences. Lectures, exercises and assignments focus on science writing, critical reading, the principles of study design, and the analysis, interpretation, and presentation of biological data.
PREREQUISITES: Nine semester-hours of Biology courses at the 2000 level or above
Three hours lecture, Two hours laboratory a week

*3350 ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR
This course explores various aspects of animal behaviour, primarily from an evolutionary perspective. Topics covered include the development and expression of behaviour, animal communication, predator-prey interactions, reproductive and parental strategies of males and females, and the application of an evolutionary approach to the study of human behaviour. Laboratories focus on how behavioural data are collected and interpreted.
PREREQUISITES: Biology 2040 and 2220. Students registered in the Bachelor of Wildlife Conservation Program may take this course after completion of Biology 1310 and Biology 2220.
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

*3510 ORNITHOLOGY
A study of avian biology with particular emphasis on identification, behaviour, breeding biology and ecology of birds. Laboratory periods will include field trips to major habitats.
PREREQUISITE: A combined average of at least 60% in Biology 1310-1320. Students registered in the Bachelor of Wildlife Conservation Program may take this course after completion of Biology 1310 and Biology 2220.
Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory a week
NOTE: With the permission of the instructor and the Chair, the prerequisite for this course may be waived for students not majoring in Biology.

3520 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY RESEARCH TECHNIQUES
This course introduces students to basic techniques in molecular biology. Lectures will cover theoretical aspects of research in the biologic sciences, such as WHMIS, BioSafety, animals as research subjects, PCR, BLAST analysis. In laboratories, students will work on projects to learn current methodologies in molecular biology such as DNA extraction and sequencing, PCR, and gel electrophoresis.
PREREQUISITES: Biology 2210, 2230 or 2240
Two hours lecture, four hours lab per week

*3610 BIOLOGY OF FISHES
An introductory course on the Biology of fishes outlining classification, comparative structure and function of the systems of major fish groups. Emphasis will be placed on the diversity, distribution, ecology and evolution of freshwater and marine fishes of the Atlantic region. Laboratory periods will involve field and laboratory studies.
PREREQUISITE: A combined average of at least 60% in Biology 1310-1320 or completion of Biology 1310 and 2510 and registration in Bachelor of Wildlife Conservation Program.
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

*3660 PLANT-ANIMAL INTERACTIONS
This course examines evolutionary and ecological themes in plant-animal interactions by presenting some of the complex interactions that have arisen between plants and animals. The course will consist of lectures on various topics such as plant communities as animal habitats, pollination and seed dispersal by animal, ant and plant interactions, insect herbivore and host-plant interactions, seed predation, and carnivorous plants and insects, and the pivotal role of plant-animal interactions in conservation biology. The course requires presentations and discussions of the primary literature, and includes some laboratory and field projects.
PREREQUISITES: Biology 2020, 2040, and 2220 or completion of Biology 1310 and 2510 and registration in Bachelor of Wildlife Conservation Program
Three hours lecture a week, three hours laboratory every other week

*3710 LIFE OF MAMMALS
This course is an introduction to the study of the animals that constitute the class Mammalia. Topics include taxonomic classification, zoogeography, reproductive strategies, ecology, behaviour, and economic considerations. Laboratory exercises include several projects involving field work with the mammalian fauna of Prince Edward Island.
PREREQUISITES: Biology 2040 and 2220 or completion of Biology 1310 and 2510 and registration in Bachelor of Wildlife Conservation Program
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

3750 MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY
The basic principles of microbiology, biochemistry, molecular biology/genetics are used to discuss aspects of microbial diseases with a particular focus on the specific mechanisms whereby disease occurs. Topics include drug-resistance development, resistance mechanisms, issues in infection prevention and control, and emerging pathogens.
PREREQUISITE: Biology 2060 or equivalent or permission of the instructor
Three hours lecture a week

*3820 EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY
This course is designed to provide students with a better understanding of evolution and how it applies to other biology courses and to their lives in general. We first trace the rise of evolutionary thought, examining the evidence for different evolutionary processes. We then more closely examine the mechanisms that result in evolutionary change. Subsequently, we look at the history of life and examine topics such as speciation, great moments in evolution, human evolution and extinction. Lastly, we deal with the diverse areas of study that benefit from an understanding of evolution.
PREREQUISITE: Biology 2220 or Biology 2230. Students registered in the Bachelor of Wildlife Conservation Program may take this course after completion of Biology 1310 and Biology 2220.
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

*3910 MARINE BIOLOGY
An introduction to the principles of Marine Biology emphasizing marine environments and organisms of PEI and the Eastern Atlantic region. Laboratory periods will involve field and laboratory studies.
PREREQUISITES: Biology 2020 and 2040. Students registered in the Bachelor of Wildlife Conservation Program may take this course after completion of Biology 1310 and Biology 2220.
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

*4010 HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY & PATHOPHYSIOLOGY
This course is an in-depth overview of the function of human organ systems emphasizing the effects of disease states. It is designed for students interested in human health professions, such as Nurse Practitioners. The course covers nervous & endocrine systems and disorders; cardio- pulmonary, blood, immune & exercise physiology and related diseases; fluid and metabolic balance and related disorders; and pregnancy. Laboratories focus on physiological principles, diseases and application of knowledge in case studies.
Cross-listed with Nursing 6010
PREREQUISITES: Biology 3260 or entry to the Master of Nursing, Nurse Practitioner stream, or permission of instructor
Three hours lecture, three hour laboratory a week
NOTE: Credit will not be given for both Biology 4010 and Nursing 6010

*4020 COMPARATIVE & ENVIRONMENTAL VERTEBRATE PHYSIOLOGY
A study of animal function emphasizing complex regulatory and metabolic mechanisms, the relationships between organ systems, and interactions between animals and their environment. Weekly laboratory exercises and a mini-research project will demonstrate experimental physiologic principles.
PREREQUISITES: Biology 2040 and 3260 or permission of instructor
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

*4030 DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY
This course provides a comprehensive overview of the main processes involved during the development of an organism. The primary focus of the course is the shared genetic and biochemical events that underlie the development of all organisms. Model systems are studied in order to highlight general principles of ontogeny. These principles are then examined in the development of other organisms, including humans. During laboratories students are exposed to basic techniques in modern developmental chemistry.
PREREQUISITE: Biology 2210
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

4040 ENDOCRINOLOGY
This course is an in depth study of animal hormones, with a focus on modern-day endocrinology issues of interest to students. Topics include anatomy and physiology of hormones and glands, hormone actions from molecular to whole organism levels, biorhythms, reproduction and development, comparison of endocrine systems among animal classes, hormones in disease and medicine, eco-toxicological effects of hormones, and methods used to study endocrinology.
PREREQUISITES: Biology 3260. Students in the BSc Paramedicine program may take Biology 4040 after Biology 1310.
Three hours lecture, three hours lab per week

4050 MEDICAL BIOLOGY
This course extends principles of biochemistry, physiology and molecular biology in the context of human diseases and treatment. Using a case-study and discussion format, the course explores advanced studies in biochemical pathways in humans, molecular regulation of biochemistry, human diseases related to altered biochemical
pathways, and pharmacology.
PREREQUISITES: Biology 1230 or 3260; Biology 2230 or 2240; and Biology 2250 or Chemistry 3530. Students in the BSc Paramedicine program may take Biology 4050 after Biology 1310.
Three hours lectures per week

*4110 PRINCIPLES OF WILDLIFE BIOLOGY
This course focuses on the basic principles of wildlife biology, wildlife management, and contemporary wildlife issues. The laboratory/field component includes an introduction to techniques used in wildlife research, habitat assessments and debates on local wildlife issues.
PREREQUISITE: Biology 2020 and 2040 or completion of Biology 1310 and 2510 and registration in Bachelor of Wildlife Conservation Program.
Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory a week

*4130 CONSERVATION GENETICS
An introduction to the guiding principles of conservation biology and genetics, and their application to the preservation of biodiversity. Students will explore current research topics, such as ecological and landscape genetics, invasion biology, and genomics for endangered species through lectures, extensive discussion and a major paper. Laboratories may involve field trips and molecular techniques.
PREREQUISITES: Biology 2220 and Biology 2230 (Biology 3820 is a recommended co-requisite, but is not essential). Students registered in the Bachelor of Wildlife Conservation Program may take this course after completion of Biology 1310 and Biology 2220.
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

4150 WILDLIFE HEALTH
This course examines the relationship between the health of free-living wild animals and their environment. The laboratory component of the course familiarizes the student with techniques of necropsy of a wide variety of mammalian and avian species, emphasizing comparative anatomy, recognition of basic macroscopic abnormalities, and harvesting techniques and basic identification of macroparasites.
PREREQUISITE: Registration in the Bachelor of Wildlife Conservation Program and completion of Biology 1310 and Biology 2220. Note: students must be vaccinated for rabies.
Four hours lecture, four hours laboratory per day for 2 weeks (summer intensive course)

*4210 DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICAL STUDIES
This course provides students who have a previous statistics course and research methods course with experience in the practical application of analytical techniques for the ecological and life sciences. Topics include design of field and laboratory studies and examination of biological data using advanced parametric, non-parametric, and multivariate methods.
PREREQUISITE: Statistics 1210 and Biology 3310 or permission of the instructor
Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week

4350 THE BIOLOGY OF SEX
This course explores the various aspects of sexual reproduction, focussing on evolutionary questions. The course compares various modes of reproduction (asexual and sexual) and examines the important questions of why sex evolved and why it is so common among plants and animals today. Topics include sexual selection, mating strategies of males and females, sperm competition, sex ratios, and various potentially controversial aspects of human sexuality from a biological perspective. The course involves extensive discussion (including student-led discussions), reading, writing, and a major paper.
PREREQUISITE: Biology 2230 (other useful courses are Biology 3350 and Biology 3820)
Three hours lecture, one hour discussion weekly

*4400 SENIOR UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECT
This course allows senior students majoring in Biology to carry out a full-year research project. The project may be lab or field based, or some combination of the two. Students work under the supervision of a faculty member and write a thesis describing the work.
PREREQUISITE: Students should be at least third year Biology Majors and have completed their second year core Biology courses. Entry to this course is contingent upon the student finding a departmental faculty member willing to supervise the research and permission of the department, no later than March 31 of their third year.
Six semester hours of credit (Credit in this course will be given only when both semesters have been completed successfully.)

4410 DIRECTED STUDIES IN BIOLOGY
Available to third year Biology Majors, preferably those who have completed their second year Biology courses. Entry to the course, and the conditions under which the course may be offered will be subject to the approval of the Chair of the Department and the Dean of Science. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies)
Three semester hours of credit

4420 SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOLOGY
An upper year course typically designed to reflect an issue of current interest in Biology. Available to third and fourth year Biology Majors, preferably those who have completed their second year core Biology courses. The conditions under which the course may be offered will be subject to the approval of the Chair of the Department and the Dean of Science.
Three semester hours of credit

*4440 INVESTIGATIVE PLANT ANATOMY
In this course students examine the simple and complex tissues of plants throughout their life cycles. Basic and advanced concepts pertaining to microscopy are taught. Students prepare material for both light and scanning electron microscopy. Innovative techniques in microscopy and preparation of photographic plates suitable for publication are also covered.
PREREQUISITE: Biology 2020
Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory a week

*4520 BIOGEOGRAPHY AND MACROECOLOGY
This course examines the patterns of distribution, species richness, and abundance of organisms in space and time with emphasis on animal communities, as well as ecology of insular biotas. Historical, ecological, geographical, and anthropological factors affecting these patterns are examined.
PREREQUISITES: A combined average of at least 60% in Biology 1310-1320. Students registered in the Bachelor of Wildlife Conservation Program may take this course after completion of Biology 1310 and Biology 2220.
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

*4540 BIODIVERSITY AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY
This course examines fundamental concepts, ideas, and approaches used in conservation biology. Different philosophies and perspectives on setting priorities for preserving and man- aging biodiversity are also discussed.
PREREQUISITE: Biology 2220. Students registered in the Bachelor of Wildlife Conservation Program may take this course after completion of Biology 1310 and Biology 2220.
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

*4620 WATERSHED ECOLOGY
The focus of this course is the study of watersheds, with emphasis on those found on Prince Edward Island. Lectures focus on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of streams and their surrounding riparian zones, and labs will include practical application of stream sampling methods.
PREREQUISITES: Biology 2220 or equivalent
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

*4650 MARINE COMMUNITY ECOLOGY
This course constitutes a critical review of the dynamics and the rules of assembly that are distinctive to marine biological communities. Its main goal is the exploration of the organizing mechanisms behind spatial and temporal patterns exhibited by planktonic and benthic communities. Although the focus is on general principles and broad ideas, specific problems and practical work relate primarily to communities and habitats from Atlantic Canada.
PREREQUISITES: Biology 2220 and Biology 3910 or permission of instructor. Students registered in the Bachelor of Wildlife Conservation Program may take this course after completion of Biology 1310 and Biology 2220.
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

4710 MOLECULAR BIOTECHNOLOGY
This course examines principles of gene manipulation, and the application of molecular biology in biotechnology. Recent developments in medicine, agriculture, industry and basic research are considered. Emphasis is placed on reviewing current literature in the field.
PREREQUISITE: Biology 2230
Three hours lecture a week

*4720 BIOLOGY OF CANCER AND OTHER DISEASES
This course presents the basic principles of pathobiology with emphasis on specific candidate human diseases. The focus of the course is on aspects of the basic biochemistry and cell biology associated with certain disease paradigms. The majority of this course will focus on the biology of cancer. The biology of heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, and AIDS, as well as, other current topical disease paradigms will be presented.
Cross-listed with Human Biology 8720
PREREQUISITE: Biology 2060 and Biology 2210
Three hours lecture a week, three hours laboratory a week
NOTE: Credit is not given for both Biology 4720 and Human Biology 8720

4750 BASIC AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY
This course presents the basic principles of immunology, its role and impact on specific mechanisms pertaining to human health. Topics include the immune system, antigen-antibody reactions, T & B cell biology and chemistry, cytokines, complement system, hypersensitivity, immune-physiology, cell mediated immunity, vaccines, AIDS and other immunodeficiencies, autoimmunity, transplant immunology and cancer.
PREREQUISITE: Biology 2060 or equivalent or permission of the instructor
Three hours lecture a week

*4850 ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY
This course introduces the basic toxicological principles with respect to environmental toxicology, including a survey of major environmental pollutants and the statutes governing chemical release. Environmental effects on biota and methods of detection of environmental pollutants will be examined using endpoints at multiple levels of biological organization from biochemical to community.
PREREQUISITE: A combined average of at least 60% in Biology 1310-1320 and Chemistry 1110-1120. Students registered in the Bachelor of Wildlife Conservation Program may take this course after completion of Biology 1310 and Chemistry 1110-1120.
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

*4900 ADVANCED RESEARCH AND THESIS
This is a 12 semester-hour course required of all Honours students. It is intended to provide the student with an opportunity to design, carry out, evaluate and write up a research project in an approved scientific fashion, while working under the direction of a chief advisor assisted by an advisory committee. Normally the research will be done during the summer session preceding the student’s graduating year, and the thesis written during the final academic year. The objective of this course is to provide research experience for the student who intends to take up further studies at a post-graduate level or for the student who is planning on entering a career where research experience in Biology or related areas would be an asset.
PREREQUISITE: Acceptance to the Honours Program in Biology

4910 WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PRACTICUM
This course provides practical experience and leadership in an area of wildlife conservation or environmental management. Students work in teams with an environmental organization on a specific project or task for 6 weeks, compile research, and present their findings in a written report and oral presentation.
PREREQUISITES: Biology 3310. Biology majors in the Environmental Biology specialization may take this course with permission of the Coordinator of the BWC program or the Chair of Biology.
Three hours lecture or seminar a week
Semester hours of credit: 3

Business Administration

http://upei.ca/business

Business Faculty
Tarek Mady, Associate Professor, Interim Dean
Gary Evans, Professor
Blake Jelley, Professor
Jürgen Krause, Professor
Timothy E. Carroll, Associate Professor
Andrew Carrothers, Associate Professor
Donald M. Wagner, Associate Professor
Crystal Burrows, Assistant Professor
Xiao Chen, Assistant Professor
Susan Graham, Assistant Professor
Melissa James, Assistant Professor
Amy MacFarlane, Assistant Professor
Matthew Pauley, Assistant Professor
Tina Saksida, Assistant Professor
William Waterman, Assistant Professor
Hayden Woodley, Assistant Professor
Luifang Yao, Assistant Professor
Sam Kolahgar, Lecturer

The Faculty of Business Administration is committed to providing students with a high quality, integrated business education in a personalized learning environment. It is structured to provide the broad-based, cross-functional business education required for leaders of business, government, and not-for-profit organizations. The Faculty’s personalized learning environment provides opportunities for extensive interaction between students, faculty and practitioners.

The Faculty of Business Administration holds a unique position within the province’s education system. It is committed to intellectual leadership, and to excellence in developing new knowledge and conveying that knowledge to its students and to the public. In order to attract, develop and retain students, faculty and staff, the Faculty recognizes that it must sustain an intellectually stimulating environment.

The Faculty views its students not as customers, but rather as partners in the development of a high quality business education. Graduates are expected to have developed competency in integrating the core functional business disciplines; ethical, social, historical and global awareness; critical thinking and problem solving; quantitative analysis; communication skills and leadership; team work as well as personal initiative; technological application in business; and using business research to support evidence-informed practice.

The degree program in the Faculty of Business Administration is designed to fulfill this mission and to provide the educational breadth and depth needed by business leaders.

ACCOUNTING AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

The Faculty of Business maintains a close liaison with the Chartered Professional Accountants of Prince Edward Island, and students who satisfactorily complete designated university courses are given broad exemptions by this professional organization. Students interested in pursuing a professional accounting designation should contact the Dean’s office prior to enrolling in their third year. These students should not enrol in Business electives other than those that are designated as accounting exemptions. Students not pursuing a Bachelor of Business Administration degree may register for the Certificate in Accounting.

Bachelor of Business Administration Degree

The Bachelor of Business Administration degree (BBA) is a four-year degree consisting of 120 semester hours.

REQUIRED COURSES

1000-Level Courses:
Accounting 1010 (Introduction to Financial Accounting)
Business 1410 (Marketing)
Business 1710 (Organizational Behaviour)
Economics 1010 (Introductory Microeconomics)
Economics 1020 (Introductory Macroeconomics)
Math 1110 (Finite Mathematics)
UPEI 1010 (Writing Studies) (see note 3)

2000-Level Courses:

Accounting 2210 (Managerial Accounting)
Business 2120 (Business Presentations and Communications)
Business 2310 (Corporate Finance)
Business 2410 (Management Information Systems)
Business 2510 (Introduction to Management Science)
Business 2720 (Human Resource Management)
Business 2880 (Research and Evidence-Based Management)
[Though English 3810 is a 3000-level course, it is recommended that students take this course in their second year.]

3000-Level Courses:

Business 3010 (Business Law – Part I)
Business 3330 (Integrated Cases in Corporate Finance) OR Business 3340 (Personal Finance)
Business 3430 (Integrated Cases in Marketing)
Business 3510 (Operations Management)
Business 3710 (Entrepreneurship and New Ventures)
Business 3910 (Strategic Management)
English 3810 (Professional Writing) [recommended to be taken in Year 2]

4000-Level Courses:

Business 4850 (Developing Management Skills)
Business 4950 (Business Research I)

ELECTIVE COURSES

In addition to the 23 required courses, students must take 17 elective courses. At least three electives must be business courses and at least eight electives must be non-business courses. The other six electives (“free electives”) may be either business or non-business courses.

For students pursuing one of the seven specializations, the courses prescribed for the particular specialization will fulfill electives on the degree.

Students must obtain at least 60% in at least 14 of the 18 required business courses in order to qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Business Administration.

NOTES:

  • Accounting courses are considered to be business courses.
  • All courses will not necessarily be offered each year. Students should consult the current timetable before registration.
  • The completion of UPEI 1010 is a required course for the BBA, but the course also meets the general UPEI requirement of taking UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030.

SPECIALIZATIONS

The specializations in the BBA Program are designed to provide students with a deeper level of expertise within a discipline, to improve students’ competitiveness upon entering the workforce.

Specialization in Accounting

A specialization in accounting is intended for business students wishing to pursue a Chartered Professional Accountant (CPA) designation after graduation. In addition to the core courses required to fulfill the BBA requirements, the following additional courses will be required to obtain the specialization:

•Accounting 2020 (Introductory Financial Accounting – Part II)

•Accounting 3010 (Intermediate Accounting – Part I)

•Accounting 3020 (Intermediate Accounting – Part II)

•Accounting 3120 (Cost Accounting)

•Accounting 4010 (Advanced Financial Accounting – Part I)

•Accounting 4020 (Advanced Financial Accounting – Part II)

•Accounting 4150 (Auditing)

•Accounting 4160 (Auditing, Accounting and Society)

•Accounting 4310 (Income Taxation)

In addition, it is recommended that students planning to pursue their CPA designation take Business 3330 (Integrated Cases in Corporate Finance), as it is a required course for entry into the CPA program.

To qualify for a specialization in accounting, students are required to have an overall average of 70% in the required courses above. Students who already hold a certificate in accounting will not receive additional recognition for a specialization in accounting.

Specialization in Entrepreneurship

The courses and experiences related to specializing in entrepreneurship provide students with the knowledge and the experiential learning to start up a business or manage one in an entrepreneurial manner. Students will study the various types of entrepreneurship including business, social, and innovation within existing organizations. The key learning outcomes for students will be to gain knowledge, confidence, skills, and practice in both entrepreneurial thinking and leading entrepreneurial initiatives. They will think analytically, ask questions, research the market, solve problems, start a new venture, launch new products/services/ideas, and develop other entrepreneurial skills.

In addition to the core BBA program, completion of the specialization in entrepreneurship requires successful completion of the following courses:

Required:

  • Business 2650 (Introduction to Small Business and Entrepreneurship)
  • Business 3650 (Small Business Management: Opportunity Analysis & Development)
  • Business 3660 (Entrepreneurial Finance)
  • Business 4460 (Personal Selling and Sales)
  • Business 4680 (Self-Employment – Behind the Scene)

Any FOUR of the following courses:

  • Business 2870 (International Business)
  • Business 4610 (Communications)
  • Business 4650 (Project Management)
  • Business 4710 (Organizational Development and Change)
  • Business 4750 (E-commerce)
  • Business 4760 (Intercultural Management)
  • Philosophy 1110 (Critical Thinking)
  • Psychology 3310 (Creativity)
  • Sociology 2920/Diversity and Social Justice Studies 2920 (Work and Society)
  • Sociology 3110 (Small Groups)

Some of the above-listed courses have prerequisites. For example, many non-business courses that are 2000-level and above, require 1000-level introductory courses (such as Sociology 1010 or Psychology 1010 and 1020) and may have additional 2000-level or 3000-level prerequisites. Students are advised to plan ahead accordingly.  To qualify for a specialization in entrepreneurship, students are required to have an overall average of 70% in the nine courses of this specialization.

Specialization in Finance

Management of financial resources is critical to the success and sustainability of both private and public organizations. An understanding of financial concepts, qualitative and quantitative problem-solving skills, and rational decision-making practices are important learning outcomes of the courses in the specialization in finance. The courses in this specialization focus on both corporate finance and personal finance with the intent of preparing the student for a career or further education related to finance. In addition to the core BBA program, completion of the specialization in finance requires successful completion of the following courses:

Required:

  • Accounting 2020 (Introductory Financial Accounting – Part II)
  • Business 3330 (Integrated Cases in Corporate Finance) (see note below)
  • Business 3340 (Personal Finance) (see note below)
  • Business 3660 (Entrepreneurial Finance)
  • Business 4390 (International Finance)

Any FIVE of the following courses:

  • Business 2870 (International Business)
  • Business 3020 (Business Law – Part II)
  • Business 4320 (Applied Investment Management)
  • Economics 2030 (Intermediate Microeconomics)
  • Economics 2040 (Intermediate Macroeconomics)
  • Economics 2310 (Mathematical Economics)
  • Economics 3710 (Economics of Sports)
  • Economics 2910 (Managerial Economics)
  • Economics 4050 (Financial Economics)
  • Economics 4120 (Public Finance)

Note regarding Business 3330 and 3340: The core BBA program requires students to take Business 3330 or 3340, but students taking the specialization in finance must take both courses.  To qualify for a specialization in finance, students are required to have an overall average of 70% in the ten courses of this specialization.

Specialization in International Business

The international opportunities in today’s world are vast. Doing business internationally is also challenging. The specialization in international business includes four business courses that provide an overview of those opportunities and challenges, as well as five electives to be chosen from a large multi-disciplinary set of courses that can enrich a student’s understanding of the world beyond our borders. The specialization also includes an international exchange term or an international work term. In addition to the core BBA program, completion of the specialization in international business requires the successful completion of the following:

Completion of an approved international academic or international co-op work term. To document that they have completed this requirement of the specialization, students must register in Business 3860 (a zero-credit hour course) for an academic exchange term, or Business 3940 (also a zero-credit hour course) for an international co-op work term. International students are deemed to have already met this requirement by virtue of having travelled from their home country to study at UPEI, but they too should register for Business 3860 to document that they have met this requirement.

Completion of the following four required courses:

  • Business 2870 (Introduction to International Business)
  • Business 4760 (Intercultural Management)
  • Business 4770 (International Marketing)
  • Business 4390 (International Finance)

Completion of any FIVE of the following courses:

  • any course designated as Business 3870 (International Business Elective)
  • any courses offered by the Department of Modern Languages
  • any courses offered by Asian Studies
  • any History courses listed under the US, British, European, Global or Greek & Roman streams
  • any Political Science courses listed in the Comparative Politics field of courses or the International field of courses
  • Anthropology 1050 (Introduction to Anthropology I)
  • Anthropology 2010 (Cultural Anthropology)
  • Anthropology 4040 (Applied and Public Interest Public Policy)
  • Economics 3310 (International Trade)
  • Economics 3320 (International Monetary Economics)
  • Economics 3410 (Economic Development Theory)
  • Economics 3420 (Economic Development Policy)
  • Psychology 4720/Diversity and Social Justice Studies 4720 (Social Justice in Psychology)
  • Religious Studies 1010 (Religions of the World – Western Traditions)
  • Religious Studies 1020 (Religions of the World – Eastern Traditions)
  • Religious Studies 1050 (World Religions)
  • Sociology/Anthropology 2120 (Peoples of South Asia)
  • Sociology/Anthropology 2420 (Peoples of Oceania)
  • Sociology/Anthropology 2510 (Peoples of Africa)
  • Sociology/Anthropology 2610 (Sex, Gender and Society)
  • Sociology/Anthropology 2630 /Diversity and Social Justice Studies 2630 (Global Youth Cultures)
  • Sociology/Anthropology 3550 /Diversity and Social Justice Studies 3550 (Globalization)

Some of the above-listed courses have prerequisites. For example, many non-business courses that are 2000-level and above, require 1000-level introductory courses (such as Sociology 1010 or Psychology 1010 and 1020) and may have additional 2000-level or 3000-level prerequisites. Students are advised to plan ahead accordingly. Students are advised to plan ahead accordingly.  To qualify for a specialization in international business, students are required to have an overall average of 70% in the nine courses of this specialization.

Specialization in Marketing

The Bachelor of Business Administration degree with a specialization in marketing is designed to introduce students to the core marketing function within the spectrum of business and further develop students’ theoretical and practical understanding of a full range of marketing activities. In addition to the core business curriculum, students pursuing a marketing specialization will take courses dedicated to marketing communications, brand management, market research, consumer behaviour, personal selling and sales, and international marketing. The marketing specialization is intended to help prepare students for entry-level positions in both small and large organizations ranging from account managers to marketing coordinators to brand managers and much more.

In addition to the core BBA program, completion of the specialization in marketing requires the successful completion of the following:

Required:

  • Business 4810 (Integrated Marketing Communications)
  • Business 4430 (Consumer Behaviour)
  • Business 4440 (Market Research)
  • Business 4450 (Brand Management)
  • Business 4460 (Personal Selling and Sales)
  • Business 4770 (International Marketing)

Any THREE of the following courses:

  • Business 4650 (Project Management)
  • Psychology 2220 (Psychology of Personal Experience)
  • Psychology 2420 (Introduction to Social Psychology)
  • Psychology 3030/Diversity and Social Justice Studies 3030 (Psychology of Aging)
  • Psychology 3050 (Adolescent Development and Adjustment)
  • Psychology 3080 (Child Development)
  • Psychology 3090 (Adult Development)
  • Psychology 3210 (Learning and Motivation: Basic Processes)
  • Psychology 3310 (Creativity)
  • Psychology 3510 (Theories of Personality)
  • Psychology 3910/Diversity and Social Justice Studies 3910 (Psychology of Women)
  • Sociology 2710 (Self and Service)
  • Sociology 3920 (Media and Society)
  • Anthropology 3100/Diversity and Social Justice Studies 3100/English 3140 (Identity and Popular Culture)
  • Family Science 2210 (Family Resource Management)
  • Family Science 2410/Kinesiology 2410 (Human Development)
  • Theatre Studies 2440 (Introduction to Theatre Study)
  • Sociology/Anthropology 2610/Diversity and Social Justice Studies 2610 (Sex, Gender and Society)
  • Sociology/Anthropology 2710 (Self and Society)

Many of the above-listed courses have prerequisites. For example, many non-business courses that are 2000-level and above, require 1000-level introductory courses (such as Sociology 1010 or Psychology 1010 and 1020) and may have additional 2000-level or 3000-level prerequisites. Students are advised to plan ahead accordingly.  To qualify for a specialization in marketing, students are required to have an overall average of 70% in the nine courses of this specialization.

Specialization in Organizational Management

The leadership and management of organizations can promote or undermine organizational effectiveness, the well-being of organizations’ members, and outcomes for other stakeholders. Management-related courses such as organizational behaviour, human resource management, and leadership and management skills are important components of the core BBA program. The specialization in organizational management allows students to delve deeper into the broad, interdisciplinary domain of management and organizational studies by combining additional management courses with relevant courses in social science and liberal arts. Substantive issues relating to organizations as well as social and behavioural research methods are features designed to help students take an evidence-based approach to management. This specialization promotes development of thoughtful, ethical, and productive members, managers, and leaders of organizations.

In addition to the core BBA program, completion of the specialization in organizational management requires successful completion of the following courses:

THREE courses from the following list of business courses (“List A”):

  • Business 3720 (Industrial Relations)
  • Business 4610 (Communications)
  • Business 4650 (Project Management)
  • Business 4710 (Organizational Development and Change)
  • Business 4760 (Intercultural Management)
  • Business 4880 (Management in Perspective)
  • Business 4070 (Special topics in Organizational Management)
  • University 2030 (Introduction to Leadership Studies)
  • University 3030 (Leadership theory and Practice)

TWO courses from the following list of non-business research courses (“List B”):

•Anthropology 3210 (Field Methods)

•Anthropology 4040 (Applied and Public Interest Anthropology)

•Information Technology 3710 (Applied Databases)

•Philosophy 1110 (Critical Thinking)

•Philosophy 3710/Diversity and Social Justice Studies 3710 (Community-Based Ethical Inquiry I)

•Psychology 3710 (Advanced Statistics)

•Psychology 3740 (Advanced Qualitative Research)

•Sociology 4010 (Doing Social Research)

•Sociology 4090 (Evaluation)

•Sociology 4620 (Approaches in Applied Sociology)

•Sociology/Anthropology 2080 (Developing the Socio-Cultural Imagination)

FOUR courses from of the following list of other non-business courses (“List C”):

•Economics 3240 (Labour Economics)

•Education 3090 (Introduction to Learning in the Workplace)

•History 4260 (A History of the Canadian Working Classes)

•Philosophy 1020 (Introduction to Ethics and Social Philosophy)

•Psychology 2420 (Introduction to Social Psychology)

•Psychology 3310 (Creativity)

•Psychology 3510 (Theories of Personality)

•Psychology 3620 (Ergonomics)

•Psychology 3810 (Human Learning and Memory)

•Psychology 3820 (Cognitive Psychology)

•Sociology 1050 (Civility and Society)

•Sociology 2750/Diversity and Social Justice Studies 2750 (Social Inequality)

•Sociology 2920/Diversity and Social Justice Studies 2920 (Work and Society)

•Sociology 3110 (Small Groups)

•Sociology 3910 (Sociology of Organizations)

Many of the above-listed courses have prerequisites. For example, many non-business courses that are 2000-level and above, require 1000-level introductory courses (such as Sociology 1010 or Psychology 1010 and 1020) and may have additional 2000-level or 3000-level prerequisites. Students are advised to plan ahead accordingly.  o qualify for a specialization in organizational management, students are required to have an overall average of 70% in the nine courses of this specialization.

Specialization in Tourism and Hospitality

The Bachelor of Business Administration degree with a specialization in tourism and hospitality is designed for students who plan to work in the tourism and hospitality industry in a management capacity or as an entrepreneur. The specialization in tourism and hospitality includes four required courses that focus specifically on the tourism and hospitality industry, as well as five electives to be chosen from a large multi-disciplinary set of courses that can enrich a students’ understanding of international business and international peoples.

In addition to the core BBA program, completion of the specialization in tourism and hospitality requires successful completion of the following courses:

Required:

•Island Studies 2110/Sociology/Anthropology 2110 (Island Tourism: The Search for Paradise)

•Business 4540 (Tourism and Hospitality Management)

•Business 4550 (Sustainable Tourism Development)

•Economics 2420 (The Economics of Tourism)

TWO courses from List A, and another THREE courses from List A or List B:

List A:

•Business 4650 (Project Management)

•Business 4760 (Intercultural Management)

•Business 4770 (International Marketing)

•Sociology/Anthropology 3740/Island Studies 3740 (Tourism)

•Any courses offered by the Department of Modern Languages

List B:

•Anthropology 1050 (Introduction to Anthropology I)

•Anthropology 2010 (Cultural Anthropology)

•Religious Studies 1010 (Religions of the World – Western Traditions)

•Religious Studies 1020 (Religions of the World – Eastern Traditions)

•Religious Studies 1050 (World Religious)

•Sociology/Anthropology 2120 (Peoples of South Asia)

•Sociology/Anthropology 2420 (Peoples of Oceania)

•Sociology/Anthropology 2510 (Peoples of Africa)

•Sociology/Anthropology 2630/ Diversity and Social Justice Studies 2630 (Global Youth Cultures)

•Sociology/Anthropology 3550/Diversity and Social Justice Studies 3550 (Globalization)

Many of the above-listed courses have prerequisites. For example, many non-business courses that are 2000-level and above, require 1000-level introductory courses (such as Sociology 1010 or Psychology 1010 and 1020) and may have additional 2000-level or 3000-level prerequisites. Students are advised to plan ahead accordingly.  To qualify for a specialization in tourism and hospitality, students are required to have an overall average of 70% in the nine courses of this specialization.

Honours in Business Administration

An Honours concentration in Business Administration provides an opportunity for BBA students to pursue advanced studies in Business. It is available to students with a strong academic background who intend to continue studies in Business at the postgraduate level, or to students who intend to pursue a career where research experience would be of value.

ADMISSION

For admission to the Honours program, students must have a minimum average of 75% in all previous courses. Permission of the School is required and is contingent on the student finding a faculty supervisor. Students interested in pursuing the Honours program should seek admission as early as possible, not later than the end of the third year.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

A total of 126 semester hours of credit is required for the BBA Honours. In addition to the requirements of the regular BBA, Honours students must complete Honours Thesis 5100 (six semester hours). This thesis would normally be completed in the semester following Business Research 4950. A committee of three faculty members, including the supervisor, will review the Honours thesis. An oral examination conducted by the committee will also be included in the evaluation process. A minimum average of 75% must be maintained to remain in the Honours program.

CO-OP EDUCATION IN BUSINESS

The UPEI Co-op Program is an integrated approach to university education which enables students to alternate academic terms on campus with work terms in suitable employment. The success of such programs is founded on the principle that students are able to apply theoretical knowledge from course studies in the workplace and return to the classroom with practical workplace experience. Students who successfully complete all the requirements of the program will have the notation entered on their transcripts and on the graduation parchment.

Students accepted into the program, complete at least three 14-week paid work terms and three professional development courses. Credits earned through completion of work terms are counted as general electives (i.e. free or non-business electives).

The Co-op option is available to full-time students in any specialization within the Faculty of Business. Applications to the Co-op Education Program are normally made after completion of the first year of study.

See the Co-operative Education Program section of the UPEI Academic Calendar for more information.

Accelerated Bachelor of Business Administration Program

The Accelerated Bachelor of Business Administration program is available to students who have a two-year diploma from Holland College (or a similar college) in Retail Management, Business, or Accounting. They must satisfy general UPEI and Faculty of Business entrance requirements. Applicants must demonstrate a minimum average of 70% in their college program.

REQUIRED COURSES:

Required courses recommended to be taken in a student’s FIRST year at UPEI:

Business 1410 – Marketing
Business 1710 – Organizational Behaviour
Business 2410 – Management Information Systems
Business 2880 – Research and Evidence-Based Management
Economics 1010 – Introductory Microeconomics
Economics 1020 – Introductory Macroeconomics
Math 1110- Finite Mathematics
UPEI 1010 – Writing Studies (see note 3)
Accounting 1010 – Introduction to Financial Accounting (except students whose college diploma was in Accounting; see note 1)

Required courses recommended to be taken in a student’s SECOND year at UPEI:

Business 2120 – Business Presentations and Communications
Business 2310 – Corporate Finance
Business 2510 – Introduction to Management Science
Business 2720 – Human Resource Management
Business 3010 – Business Law – Part I
Business 3430 – Integrated Cases in Marketing
English 3810 – Professional Writing
Accounting 2210 – Managerial Accounting

Required courses recommended to be taken in a student’s THIRD year at UPEI:

Business 3330 – Integrated Cases in Corporate Finance OR Business 334 – Personal Finance
Business 3510 – Operations Management
Business 3710 – Entrepreneurship and New Ventures
Business 3910 – Strategic Management
Business 4850 – Developing Management Skills
Business 4950 – Business Research I

ELECTIVE COURSES:

For students whose college diploma was in Accounting:

In addition to the 22 required courses, students must take 8 elective courses. At least three electives must be business courses, and at least four electives must be non-business courses. The other elective (“a free elective”) may be either a business or a non-business course.

For students whose college diploma was in Business or Retail Management:

In addition to the 23 required courses, students must take 7 elective courses. At least two electives must be business courses, and at least four electives must be non-business courses. The other elective (“a free elective”) may be either a business or a non-business course.

Students must obtain at least 60% in at least 14 of the 18 required business courses in order to qualify for the degree of Accelerated Bachelor of Business Administration.

NOTES:

1. Students in the Retail or Business Program will also be required to take Accounting 1010 if they have not completed the equivalent at Holland College or an equivalent community college program.
2. Students in this program are eligible for the Business Coop option.
3. The completion of UPEI 1010 is a required course for the Accelerated BBA, but the course also meets the general UPEI requirement of taking UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030.

Bachelor of Business in Tourism and Hospitality

The Bachelor of Business in Tourism and Hospitality (BBTH) is a two-year post-diploma degree available only to graduates of diploma programs at the Atlantic Tourism and Hospitality Institute (ATHI) or of similar programs at similar post-secondary institutions. This post-diploma degree provides the opportunity for students to continue their education through a concentration in Business Administration.

Students must meet the UPEI admission requirements for this degree by completing the ATHI diploma, including economics, or equivalent course work at a university or college, with a minimum overall average of 70%. In the BBTH program, students must obtain grades of at least 60% in at least 12 of the 16 required business courses in order to qualify for the degree. Students are subject to all of the Academic Regulations of the University.

REQUIRED COURSES

Required courses recommended to be taken in a student’s FIRST year at UPEI:

Accounting 1010 – Introduction to Financial Accounting
Accounting 2210 – Managerial Accounting
Business 1410 – Marketing
Business 1710 – Organizational Behaviour
Business 2120 – Business Presentations and Communications
Business 2510 – Introduction to Management Science
Business 2880 – Research and Evidence-Based Management
Business 3010- Business Law – Part I
UPEI 1010 – Writing Studies (see note 4)

Required courses recommended to be taken in a student’s SECOND year at UPEI:

Business 2310- Corporate Finance
Business 2720 – Human Resource Management
Business 3330 – Integrated Cases in Corporate Finance OR Business 334 – Personal Finance
Business 3430 – Integrated Cases in Marketing
Business 3510 – Operations Management
Business 3710 – Entrepreneurship and New Ventures
Business 3910 – Strategic Management
Business 4850 – Developing Management Skills
English 3810 – Professional Writing

ELECTIVE COURSES

In addition to the 18 required courses, students must take 2 elective courses. At least one elective must be a non-business course. The other elective (“a free elective”) may be either a business or a non-business course. For the non-business elective, Island Studies 2110 (Island Tourism: The Search for Paradise) is highly recommended.

NOTES:

  1. Accounting courses are considered to be Business electives.
  2. Due to student enrolments and faculty availability, some courses may not necessarily be offered each year. Students should consult the current timetable before registration.
  3. Business 3730 (Tourism Management) or Business 4540 (Tourism and Hospitality management) is recommended for the free elective.
  4. The completion of UPEI 1010 is a required course for the BBTH, but the course also meets the general UPEI requirement of taking UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030.
  5. Students are eligible to apply to the Cooperative Education program upon entrance to the University.
  6. The following courses are not eligible as electives for the BBTH program: Math 1110/1120, and Economics 1010/1020.

Bachelor of Business Studies

The Bachelor of Business Studies (BBST) program is a post-diploma degree. It will require a minimum of two years of academic study at UPEI, the curriculum of which will consist primarily of core courses and a few electives.

To be eligible for program admission, students must have already completed a two-year business diploma in specified programs at a recognized college and have achieved an overall average of 70%. Students must meet the UPEI admission requirements for this degree. In the BBST, students must obtain grades of at least 60% in at least 12 of the 16 required business courses in order to qualify for the degree. Students are subject to all of the Academic Regulations of the University.

REQUIRED COURSES

Required courses recommended to be taken in a student’s FIRST year at UPEI:

Business 1410 – Marketing
Business 1710 – Organizational Behaviour
Business 2120 – Business Presentations and Communications
Business 2510 – Introduction to Management Science
Business 2880 – Research and Evidence-Based Management
Business 3010 – Business Law – Part I
Accounting 1010- Introduction to Financial Accounting (except students whose college diploma was in Accounting; see note 1)
Accounting 2210 – Managerial Accounting
UPEI 1010 – Writing Studies (see note 7)

Required courses recommended to be taken in a student’s SECOND year at UPEI:

Business 2310 – Corporate Finance
Business 2720 – Human Resource Management
Business 3330 – Integrated Cases in Corporate Finance OR Business 3340 – Personal Finance
Business 3430 – Integrated Cases in Marketing
Business 3510 – Operations Management
Business 3710 – Entrepreneurship and New Ventures
Business 3910 – Strategic Management
Business 4850 – Developing Management Skills
English 3810 – Professional Writing

ELECTIVE COURSES

For students whose college diploma was in Accounting:

In addition to the 17 required courses, students must take 3 elective courses. At least one elective must be a business course and at least one elective must be a non-business elective. The other elective (“a free elective”) may be either a business or a non-business course.

For students whose college diploma was in Business or Retail Management:

In addition to the 18 required courses, students must take 2 elective courses. At least one elective must be a non-business course. The other elective (“a free elective”) may be either a business or a non-business course.

NOTES:

  1. Students who have completed a diploma in Accounting Technology must take a business elective in place of Accounting 1010.
  2. Accounting courses are considered to be Business electives. Due to student enrolments and faculty availability, some courses may not necessarily be offered each year. Students should consult the current timetable before registration.
  3. Political Science 2010 (Canadian Politics I: Government) and 3110 (Canadian Public Administration) are recommended as potential non-business electives.
  4. Recommended Business electives include Business 2650 (Introduction to Small Business and Entrepreneurship), Business 4650 (Project Management), Business 4710 (Org. Development), and Business 4760 (Intercultural Management).
  5. Students are eligible to apply to the Co-operative Education program upon entrance to the university.
  6. Unless specified, the following courses are not eligible as electives for the BBST program: Math 1110/1120, Economics 1010/1020, and Business 1010.
  7. The completion of UPEI 1010 is a required course for the BBST, but the course also meets the general UPEI requirement of taking UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030.

Minor in Business Administration

The Minor in Business Administration is designed for students in faculties other than Business Administration. The Minor consists of at least twenty-one semester hours. Completion of the Minor in Business Administration requires successful completion of the following courses:

Required:

Accounting 1010 – Introduction to Financial Accounting

Business 1410 – Marketing

Business 1710 – Organizational Behaviour

FOUR of the following courses:

Accounting 2210 – Managerial Accounting

Business 2510- Introduction to Management Science

Business 2650 – Introduction to Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management

Business 2880 – Research and Evidence-Based Management

Business 2310 – Corporate Finance

Business 2720 – Human Resource Management

Business 3010 – Business Law – Part I

Business 3330 – Integrated Cases in Corporate Finance OR Business 3340 – Personal Finance

Business 3430 – Integrated Cases in Marketing

Business 3510 – Operations Management

Business 3710 – Entrepreneurship and New Ventures

Business 4850 – Developing Management Skills

Certificate in Business

The Business Certificate is intended for students who satisfy the entrance requirements of the Business Program but are not pursuing a Business degree. Generally, students must have successfully completed Grade 12 in a University Preparatory program with an overall average of at least 70% in English, Mathematics, any two Social Studies, Languages, or Sciences, and one other academic course.

Applicants with the appropriate work experience may also be accepted into the program.

The objective of this certificate program is to provide students with a sampling of courses in the areas of business. For those students interested, the certificate program also provides many of the foundation courses required to enter the BBA degree program.

The Business Certificate is a credit program comprised of ten three-semester hour courses: three required courses and seven elective courses. The courses are generally offered during the normal academic year, but some may be offered during summer school.

Please note: students enrolled in the Bachelor degree in Business Administration, the Bachelor of Business in Tourism and Hospitality and the Bachelor of Business Studies do not qualify for the certificate.

Required courses:

Accounting 1010 – Introduction to Financial Accounting

Business 1410 – Marketing

Business 1710 – Organizational Behaviour

SEVEN of the following courses:

Accounting 2210 – Managerial Accounting

Business 2510 – Introduction to Management Science

Business 2650 – Introduction to Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management

Business 2880 – Research and Evidence-Based Management

Business 2310 – Corporate Finance

Business 2720 – Human Resource Management

Business 3010 – Business Law – Part I

Business 3330 – Integrated Cases in Corporate Finance

Business 3340 – Personal Finance

Business 3430 – Integrated Cases in Marketing

Business 3510 – Operations Management

Business 3710 – Entrepreneurship and New Ventures

Business 4650 – Project Management

Business 4850 – Developing Management Skills

Students must obtain grades of at least 60% in at least 7 of the 10 business courses in order to qualify for the Certificate of Business.

Certificate in Accounting

The Accounting Certificate is intended for non-business students who satisfy the entrance requirements of the Business program. Generally, students must have successfully completed Grade 12 in a University Preparatory program with an overall average of at least 70% in English, Mathematics, any two Social Studies, Languages, or Sciences, and one other academic course.  Applicants with the appropriate work experience may also be accepted into the program.

Students who graduated with a BBA, BBST or BBTH, without the Accounting Specialization, are also eligible to return to complete the Accounting Certificate.

The Certificate provides some of the foundation courses for the Chartered Professional Accountant designation. To be eligible to receive the Certificate, students must obtain a minimum average of 60% in each of the courses taken.

REQUIRED COURSES

Accounting 1010 – Introduction to Financial Accounting

Accounting 2020 – Introductory Financial Accounting – Part II

Business 2310 – Corporate Finance

Business 2410 – Management Information Systems

Accounting 3010 – Intermediate Accounting – Part I

Accounting 3020 – Intermediate Accounting – Part II

FOUR of the following courses:

Accounting 2210 – Managerial Accounting

Accounting 3120 – Cost Accounting

Accounting 4010 – Advanced Financial Accounting – Part I

Accounting 4020 – Advanced Financial Accounting – Part II

Accounting 4150 – Auditing

Accounting 4160 – Auditing, Accounting, and Society

Business 3330 – Integrated Cases in Corporate Finance

English 3810 – Professional Writing

Students who have earned a specialization in accounting in the Bachelor of Business Administration program are not eligible for the Certificate in Accounting.

ACCOUNTING COURSES

1010 INTRODUCTORY ACCOUNTING—Part I
This course introduces the accounting model and basic accounting concepts and principles needed to read, analyze and interpret financial statements. An understanding of the role of accounting in society will be explored. Sound ethical judgment for financial decision-making will be stressed. Emphasis is on accounting from a “user’s” perspective.
Three hours a week

2020 INTRODUCTORY ACCOUNTING—Part II
This course focuses on understanding and applying the accounting equation, recording transactions and preparing financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. Differences between International Financial Reporting Standards and Accounting Standards for Private Enterprises will be highlighted. Sound ethical judgment for financial statement preparation will be stressed. Emphasis is on accounting from a “preparer’s” perspective.
PREREQUISITE: Accounting 1010 and a minimum of second year standing in an undergraduate program in the Faculty of Business or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

2210 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING
The emphasis throughout this course is on the uses of accounting and other financial tools in the management of a business. Topics include inventory costing methods, cost allocation, cost behaviour, the contribution approach, pricing, and budgeting.
PREREQUISITE: Accounting 1010
Three hours a week

3010 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING—Part I
This course provides in-depth coverage of the accounting standards required for corporate financial reporting for both public and private enterprises. It introduces students to the Canadian accounting environment and the concepts and principles from which Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) have grown. Specific emphasis is given to the major asset categories found on corporate balance sheets through extensive coverage of cash, accounts receivable, inventories, capital assets and investments. Other topics covered in detail include current liabilities, revenue and expense recognition, and the statement of cash flows.
PREREQUISITE: Accounting 2020 and a minimum of third year standing in an undergraduate program in the Faculty of Business or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3020 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING—Part II
This course continues the examination of balance sheet items with extensive coverage of the accounting and reporting issues related to liabilities and shareholders’ equity, including complex debt and equity instruments, corporate income taxes, leases, pensions and other post-employment benefits, earnings per share, and restatements.
PREREQUISITE: A minimum grade of 60% in Accounting 3010 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3120 COST ACCOUNTING
Topics include standard costing, budgets, flexible budgets, variance analysis, pricing, relevance and decentralization, and transfer pricing. This course will also incorporate case studies to highlight the application of methodology.
PREREQUISITE: A minimum of 60% in Accounting 2210 and a minimum of third year standing in an undergraduate program or permission of the instructor

4010 ADVANCED FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING—Part I
This course covers the study of mergers and acquisitions using the purchase method, and accounting for intercompany transactions and their elimination to arrive at consolidated financial statements.
PREREQUISITE: A minimum grade of 60% in Accounting 3020 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4020 ADVANCED FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING— Part II
This course covers the accounting for partnerships, municipal governments, not-for-profit organizations, trusts and estates, and foreign exchange transactions.
PREREQUISITE: A minimum grade of 60% in Accounting 4010 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4150 AUDITING
This course provides an introduction to the auditing profession and specifically the external audit of financial statements. This course focuses on the three phases of the audit process – risk assessment, risk response and reporting. The role of ethics and independence within the auditing profession will be emphasized.
PREREQUISITE: A minimum grade of 60% in Accounting 3020 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4160 AUDITING, ACCOUNTING AND SOCIETY
The main focus of this course will be the application and extension of auditing and accounting concepts to realistic scenarios through the use of case analysis. This advanced course will also focus on the role of auditors and accountants in society. Topics include the financial reporting environment, the standard-setting process, regulatory influences on the profession, corporate governance, ethics and professionalism, and emerging issues in the profession.
PREREQUISITE: A minimum grade of 60% in Accounting 4150 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4310 INCOME TAXATION
This course introduces students to income tax law for both individuals and corporations. The course is designed for students pursuing a professional accounting designation or a career requiring an advanced knowledge of tax.
PREREQUISITES: A minimum grade of 60% in Accounting 3020 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

BUSINESS COURSES

1010 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS
An introduction to the functional areas of business. Topics to be covered include business organizations, marketing, finance, accounting, production, and personnel. Much emphasis will be placed on the development of both written and oral communication skills in a business context. Case studies will be used to reinforce theoretical concepts discussed.
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) for those students enrolled in the EAP program.
Three hours a week

1410 MARKETING
This course presents the basic concepts of marketing. It introduces the marketing function, marketing systems and the marketing concept and then focuses on the development of marketing strategies, target markets, and the marketing mix in a decisionmaking context.
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) for those students enrolled in the EAP Program.
Three hours a week

1710 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOUR
This course introduces students to the theory of organizational behaviour (the study of people at work in organizations). It examines the behaviours of individuals working alone or in teams, and how organizational characteristics, management practices and other factors influence this behaviour, and ultimately organizational effectiveness.
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) for those students enrolled in the EAP Program.
Three hours a week

2110 BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS
This course focuses on developing students’ writing and presentation skills in a business environment. Students will learn techniques to help them communicate with professionalism, clarity and persuasiveness in a variety of business contexts.
PREREQUISITES: English 1010 or UPEI 1020, or UPEI 1030, and must be registered in Business with a 2nd year standing
Three hours a week

2120 BUSINESS PRESENTATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS
This course develops students’ presentations skills in a business context. The course emphasizes professionalism and the use of evidence and analysis to support recommendations in order to make a compelling case.
PREREQUISITES: English 1010 or UPEI 1010. Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) for those students enrolled in the EAP Program.
Three hours a week

2130 BUSINESS ETHICS
(See Philosophy 2050)

2310 CORPORATE FINANCE
Finance is concerned with the planning for, acquisition, and utilization of funds. The major topics discussed in this course include the time value of money, analysis of financial projections, of financial markets, sources of corporate financing, cost of capital, capital budgeting, and working capital management.
PREREQUISITE: Accounting 1010
Three hours a week

2410 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS
This course provides an introduction and understanding of the value and uses of information systems for business operation and management decision-making. It concentrates on providing an understanding of the tools and basic terminology needed to understand information systems and their role in the business environment. Topics include information systems concepts, a review of information technology concepts, the fundamentals of e-business, planning and development of information systems, and the management of these systems.
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) for those students enrolled in the EAP Program.
Three hours a week

2510 INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT SCIENCE
This course is designed to provide business students with an introductory survey of the many business applications of descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include frequency distributions, measures of location and dispersion, basic probability theory, discrete and continuous probability distributions, sampling methods and sampling distributions, sample size, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, linear regression, and forecasting.
PREREQUISITE: Math 1110 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week
NOTE: This is a required course for Business students and credit for Statistics 1210, Education 4810, Psychology 2710, 2780 or 2790, Sociology 3310, and Sociology 3320 will not be allowed.

2530 LE FRANÇAIS DES AFFAIRES
(See French 2520)

2540 CANADIAN BUSINESS CULTURE
Students will be exposed to Canadian business culture through readings, individual and group assignments, conversations with guests, and class presentations. Students are required to complete all readings, attend all classes, and complete all oral and written assignments during this intensive classroom experience. This course is intended for international students in EAP Level 7 or recent EAP graduates, as well as for 1st and 2nd year international undergraduate Business students who wish to gain further understanding of the Canadian business context.
PREREQUISITE: Permission of the instructor or EAP Coordinator.
3 hours credit

2650 INTRODUCTION TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
This course provides an overview of setting up and managing a small business. Topics include an overview of entrepreneurship, starting a new firm, uncovering business opportunities, challenges faced by entrepreneurs, and exploring entrepreneurship business models. The course benefits from guest speakers from the local community of small-business owners and culminates in the building of a formal business plan.
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) for those students enrolled in the EAP Program.
Three hours a week

2720 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
Human Resource Management (HRM) has become a strategic function for both private and public organizations. This course provides an introduction to the conceptual and practical aspects of HRM. It focuses on the personnel processes involved in the procurement, development and maintenance of human resources, such as staffing, training and compensation. The course also includes a critical examination of current personnel issues and trends.
PREREQUISITE: Business 1710
Three hours a week

2750 INTRODUCTION TO BIOTECHNOLOGY
This course is an overview of the biotechnology and life sciences industry, including discovery and development, regulatory and marketing requirements, management, intellectual property requirements, types and sources of innovation, and key issues in technology strategy. No advanced scientific knowledge is presumed or required; a scientific “primer” provides deeper understanding of some of the reading materials and discussions. The class consists of lectures, discussion, and examination of several current topics in the biotechnology and biopharmaceutical industry.
PREREQUISITES: 2nd year standing as a Business or Science student, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

2850 SPECIAL TOPICS
This is an introductory course in Business Administration on various topics for students who are interested in pursuing a Business degree. Lectures, readings and/or research will be undertaken in a variety of specialized areas. Topics will be approved by the faculty of Business Administration.
Three hours a week

2870 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
This course examines the basic issues involved in the internationalization of business, which includes the impact of international focus on business and how firms establish and conduct transactions with organizations from other countries. More specifically, the course examines the basic models of involvement in international business and the conditions appropriate for each. Class sessions will combine seminars and case discussions requiring active participation by all students.
PREREQUISITE: Business 1410 and 1710
Three hours a week

2880 RESEARCH AND EVIDENCE-BASED MANAGEMENT
Evidence-based management considers ethics and stakeholder concerns, practitioner judgment and expertise, local data and experimentation, and principles derived through formal research to inform decision-making. This course introduces students to qualitative and quantitative perspectives and methods for conducting and evaluating business research. Students develop information literacy as they learn to question assumptions and think critically about the nature of evidence and claims made about organizational phenomena. Problems in and prospects for improved managerial decision-making are included.
PREREQUISITE: Minimum of second year standing in an undergraduate program or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3010 BUSINESS LAW—Part I
This course offers students a basic introduction to the legal system and, in particular, the areas of tort, property, and contract law. A major portion of the course is devoted to the study of the legal implications of contractual issues in business endeavours. Legal cases are used, when applicable, to illustrate principles of law.
Three hours a week

3020 BUSINESS LAW—Part II
This course expands on the concepts introduced in Business 3010, and addresses some additional areas of law. Topics include securities legislation, landlord and tenant law, real estate law, environmental law, wills and estates, family law, and other business-related areas of law.
PREREQUISITE: Business 3010
Three hours a week

3330 INTEGRATED CASES IN CORPORATE FINANCE
The main focus of the course is the application of financial concepts to realistic business situations through the use of business cases. The principal areas covered will be financial analysis, financial forecasting, valuation, leasing, mergers and acquisitions, and derivative securities.
PREREQUISITE: Business 2310
Three hours a week

3340 PERSONAL FINANCE
This course provides students with theoretical and practical information regarding personal financial planning including budgeting, personal taxation principles, the use and cost of credit, the importance of saving, investment strategies, retirement planning, estate planning, real estate and mortgages, and the use of property and life insurance.
PREREQUISITE: Business 2310 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3430 INTEGRATED CASES IN MARKETING
This course shows how basic marketing concepts are applied and integrated with other business functions in contemporary business situations. The main focus of the course is on marketing management, planning, executing, and controlling marketing programs. Other topics include international marketing, marketing research, and the social responsibility of marketing managers. The course considers the relationships between these topics and the other business functions. There is extensive use of case method teaching and students are expected to develop the written and oral communication skills necessary for problem solving in marketing.
PREREQUISITE: Business 1410 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3510 OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT
This course covers an analysis of the nature and problems of production and operations management. Emphasis is given to a number of topics including quality management and SPC, product and service design, processes and technology, capacity and facilities, supply chain management, scheduling and distribution, inventory management and sales and operations planning. The intent is to take a broad view of the subject material as opposed to developing significant in-depth expertise in one or more areas.
PREREQUISITE: Business 2510
Three hours a week

3650 SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT: OPPORTUNITY ANALYSIS AND DEVELOPMENT
This course will cover a range of topics to address various aspects of entrepreneurship, intrapreneurship and how to identify and analyze compelling opportunities. The first part of the course will consider innovation strategy and management, including culture, motivation and commercialization. The course will be an active learning experience that helps to map what it takes to grow a business to its full potential. Topics will include assessing opportunities; managing different forms of start-ups; evaluating founding team expertise; considering resource needs; venture financing; marketing and strategic considerations. The course will include a combination of seminars, cases, speakers, and hands-on project work.
PREREQUISITES: Business 1410, 1710, 2650, Accounting 1010
Three hours a week

3660 ENTREPRENEURIAL FINANCE
This course explores the dynamic challenges faced by entrepreneurial firms in securing financial backing to support start-up, development, and growth. The course is organized around the evolution of entrepreneurial companies emphasizing the dynamic nature of the issues confronting these firms. The financial factors that affect entrepreneurial firms at various stages through to the exit decision are considered. Specific topics include the viability of proposed start-up ventures, the potential sources of financing for entrepreneurial firms, financial distress, and the harvesting decision. The key decisions of firms at various phases of their life cycle are examined. A mix of interactive lectures and case discussions is used.
PREREQUISITE: Business 2310 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3710 ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND NEW VENTURES
This course is a study of the nature and background of entrepreneurship and the process involved from idea to opportunity to new business venture. Students are expected to study the environment in which entrepreneurship flourishes from both the perspective of the entrepreneur and of the economic system. The generation of ideas and opportunities is discussed, as well as the subsequent transformation of an opportunity into a formal business plan. The course concludes with an examination of the process of implementation of the business plan and the management of the new business which results. Extensive case analysis is required.
PREREQUISITE: Accounting 1010, Business 1410 and 2310
Three hours a week

3720 INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
In this course students study the relationship between the labour force and management in the modern organization. Particular attention is given to the nature and role of trade unionism and collective bargaining. A basic objective of the course is to explore the conditions for effective industrial relations in the process of management.
PREREQUISITE: Business 2720 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3730 TOURISM MANAGEMENT
This course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the management of the world’s largest industry—tourism. The course examines key elements of the industry including its scope, the role of transportation, accommodations and attractions, culture and other travel motivators, tourism research and marketing, and the development and distribution of tourism products. The course assesses Prince Edward Island’s experience with tourism and its impact on the local economy.
PREREQUISITE: Business 1410 recommended or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3850 SPECIAL TOPICS
An intermediate course in Business Administration on a variety of topics for students who have qualified for advanced Business Administration study. Lectures, readings and/or research will be undertaken in a variety of specialized areas. Topics will be approved by the faculty of Business Administration.
Three hours a week

3860 INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE TERM
Students who go on an international exchange term and who wish to count that experience towards a Specialization in International Business must register under this course number to document that they have fulfilled that requirement of the specialization. This is not a course that counts towards a student’s requirement of 120 credit hours for a degree.
PREREQUISITE: Approval from the Faculty of Business’ Director of International Programs.
0 semester hours

3870 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS ELECTIVE
This course number is reserved for courses transferred in from other universities that qualify as electives for the Specialization in International Business.
Three hours a week

3910 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT
This course provides students with an opportunity to explore the concepts of strategic thinking, analysis, and planning. It integrates the functional and process areas studied in the degree program and utilizes cases to give students experience in crafting business strategy.
PREREQUISITE: Business 1410, 2310 and 2720
Three hours a week

3940 INTERNATIONAL CO-OP PLACEMENT
Students who go on an international work term and who wish to count that experience towards a Specialization in International Business must register under this course number to document that they have fulfilled that requirement of the specialization. This is not a course that counts towards a student’s requirement of 120 credit hours for a degree.
PREREQUISITE: Approval by the Faculty of Business’ Director of International Programs.
0 semester hours

4070 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT
An advanced course in organizational management on a variety of topics for students who have qualified for advanced Business Administration study. Lectures, readings and/or research will be undertaken in a variety of specialized areas. Topics will be approved by the faculty of Business.
Three hours a week

4320 APPLIED INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT
This course examines the various investment assets available to the individual, with a focus on the practical aspects of investing, and also considers important theoretical concepts necessary for a full appreciation of investment management. Major topics include the financial markets, financial intermediaries, types of investments, the purpose of a stock exchange, and market theories. Students undertake a fundamental analysis of a public company’s common shares and present an investment recommendation.
PREREQUISITE: Business 2310 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4390 INTERNATIONAL FINANCE
This course examines international finance and applications from a business perspective. Some of the key topics include foreign exchange markets, world capital markets (including banking), the use of derivatives, risk management, globalization, and foreign direct investment.
PREREQUISITE: Business 3330 or permission of instructor
Three hours a week

4430 CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR
This course explores the consumer buying process and the ways in which marketers can influence and shape the attitudes and actions of consumers through strategic marketing initiatives to cultivate consumer and organization satisfaction.
PREREQUISITE: Business 3430 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4440 MARKET RESEARCH
This course will introduce students to the practice of market research. Specifically, students will understand the role and importance of market research in evidence-based decision making, will practice evidence-based market research, and will develop the skills to develop and report on evidence-based market research plans.
PREREQUISITE: Business 2880 and 3430, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4450 BRAND MANAGEMENT
This course will provide students with an overview of strategic brand development and management as a means of connecting with consumers and establishing a market differentiation.
PREREQUISITE: Business 3430 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4460 PERSONAL SELLING AND SALES
This course will examine the principles and practices of personal selling as a strategic part of an overall marketing plan. Specifically, the course will look at customer relationship management, developing sales pitches, and business-to-business sales strategies.
PREREQUISITE: Business 3430 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4540 TOURISM AND HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT
This course introduces the elements of tourism and hospitality: facility and accommodation, food and beverage, travel, tourism activities and the economic impact of tourism. A creative problem-solving approach is applied to the development and design of these elements. The course stresses critical thinking techniques as well as writing and presentation skills.
PREREQUISITE: Accounting 1010, Business 3430, and Business 2720, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4550 SUSTAINABLE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT
This course critically examines sustainable and responsible tourism development practices at both the micro and macro levels of the industry. Case study analysis is an integral component of the course. A major focus will be on benefits and impacts associated with tourism development, as well as the strategies for maximizing benefits and minimizing adverse effects.
PREREQUISITE: Business 1410 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4610 COMMUNICATIONS
This course examines behavioural concepts associated with the communication process. Each section of the course is designed to help students acquire a sensitivity to the communication process. Students are expected to acquire an awareness of techniques of effective communication through readings, cases and simulations.
PREREQUISITE: Business 1710 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4650 PROJECT MANAGEMENT
Project Management is the application of knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques to project activities to meet project requirements. The course emphasizes the design, scheduling, budgeting, and management of projects from a variety of fields.
PREREQUISITE: Business 3510
Three hours a week

4680 SELF EMPLOYMENT – BEHIND THE SCENE
This is a very practical course looking inside the world of small to medium size businesses. Witness self employment and management first hand through guest speakers, field trips and class discussion. Gain valuable insight into strategizing and executing a business idea.
PREREQUISITES: Business 3710, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4710 ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND CHANGE
For organizations to survive and thrive they must adapt to changes in their environments as well as engage proactively to improve. Change can be planned or reactive and include major paradigm shifts as well as smaller adjustments. This course considers the nature of organizational change and strategies for managing change and improving organizations.
PREREQUISITE: Business 2720 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4750 E-COMMERCE
This course surveys a variety of e-business models through the use of case studies. Students are introduced to strategic, legal, and technology issues that businesses face when changing business processes in an electronic commerce environment.
PREREQUISITE: Business 3330 and 3430, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4760 INTERCULTURAL MANAGEMENT
This course examines the complex challenges that culture poses in international business. Topics covered include cultural influences on conducting business, values and communications, managing multicultural teams, international negotiations, and conflict resolution. The course aims to develop intercultural management knowledge and skills for working globally.
PREREQUISITE: Business 1710 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4770 INTERNATIONAL MARKETING
This course addresses global issues that confront today’s international marketer and presents concepts relevant to all international marketers. The focus is to develop a managerial understanding of international marketing and the competitiveness of Canadian and Island businesses in the global market. It provides a view of world markets, their respective consumers and environments, and the marketing management required to meet the demands of dynamic international settings.
PREREQUISITE: Business 3430 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4790 SELECTED TOPICS IN MARKETING
This course deals with selected topics in marketing such as advertising, sales management, retailing, business marketing, tourism, and contemporary marketing issues. The course includes a range of active learning approaches, such as case discussions, computer simulations, and projects.
PREREQUISITE: Business 3430
Three hours a week

4810 INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
This course examines how consumer decision-making processes form the basis for promotions. In this context, the course deals with principles for developing advertising campaigns, trade and consumer promotion techniques, and methods for relating optimal advertising and a consistent message across all audiences while maximizing budgets.
PREREQUISITE: Business 3430 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4820 SPECIAL TOPICS
An advanced course in Business Administration on a variety of topics for students who have qualified for advanced Business Administration study. Readings and/or research will be under-taken in a variety of specialized areas. Topics will be approved by the faculty of Business Administration.
Three hours a week

4840 DIRECTED STUDIES
This is an upper level course that does not have a prescribed curriculum. In consultation with the course professor, the student chooses a specific topic and then undertakes an in-depth study of this topic. The course professor must approve all directed-study activities before registration can occur.
Three hours a week

4850 DEVELOPING MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP SKILLS
In this course, learners are provided with tools and exercises that are used to develop self-awareness, creativity, conflict resolution, and empowerment skills. Learners begin a process of self-assessment which can continue to serve their development as managers after the course is completed.
PREREQUISITE: Business 2720, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4860 CURRENT ISSUES IN BUSINESS
This course offers students a program of study on a number of topics judged by faculty to be current, and likely to have a long-term impact on business management. Such topics may include, but are not limited to, changing employment structures, information technology uses in business, re-engineering, evolving regulatory environments, comparative business environments, and sustainable development.
PREREQUISITE: Business 1710, 3330 or 3430
Three hours a week

4880 MANAGEMENT IN PERSPECTIVE
This course examines the emergence and evolution of management and management education. Class sessions follow a seminar format and students are required to complete an independent research paper. Students critically examine historical or contemporary topics about management, management education, and related fields.
PREREQUISITE: Business 1710, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4890 INTERNATIONAL STRATEGY AND FINANCE
This course examines issues important to international business management. Some of the key topics include international trade, foreign investment, foreign exchange markets and international strategy. The course includes seminars and case studies, and requires active participation by all students.
PREREQUISITES: Business 1410, 2310, 3510, or permission of instructor
Three hours a week

4950 BUSINESS RESEARCH I
This required course examines the general methodology of conducting business research. The student will use the principles acquired in class to prepare and present a substantial paper on a research topic chosen in consultation with a faculty supervisor.
PREREQUISITE: Business 1410, Business 2310, and Business 2880; or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4960 BUSINESS RESEARCH II
This course allows students to pursue a research project in further depth.
PREREQUISITE: Business 4950 and permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4970 BUSINESS CASE COMPETITION
The UPEI Case Competition class is an intensive case-based, experiential learning course that trains students to compete in national and international case competitions. Students work in teams and work with a coach to engage in self-motivated, self-directed studies. They build upon their business skills and knowledge by sourcing and learning current, relevant business theory and implementing it into their case solutions. Students focus on constructing logical, evidence-based, clear solutions for business cases while practicing public speaking, presenting and business writing. Cases cover many areas of business: strategy, marketing, ethics, accounting, human resource management, and finance, across many industries and topics. The course includes weekly mock case competitions as well as regional, national, and international case competitions.
PREREQUISITE: Permission of the instructor only
Three hours a week
Note: Can substitute for Business 4950

5100 HONOURS THESIS
This course is aimed at students interested in pursuing an extensive research project. It is a required course in the BBA Honours Program.
PREREQUISITE: Business 4950 and permission of the instructor
Six hours a week

Canadian Studies

http://upei.ca/canadianstudies

Canadian Studies is an interdisciplinary program drawing on the resources of eight departments at UPEI. The goal of the program is to provide students with an in-depth understanding of Canadian society and culture. A student may major in Canadian Studies, may double major in Canadian Studies and another discipline, or may minor in Canadian Studies.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN CANADIAN STUDIES

1. Students pursuing a Major in Canadian Studies must complete 42 semester hours (14 courses) in the Canadian Studies Program. These semester hours must be composed of the two required core courses in Canadian Studies (CST 1020 and CST 4110); one course in research methods (one of English 2040, History 2110, or Sociology 3310); eleven courses from Option Lists A, B, C, and D, with at least two courses from each option list and at least three 3000 level courses and three 4000 level courses.

2. Students are required to maintain an average of 65% in the Canadian-area courses.

3. There is a French Language co-requisite of three semester hours in French. Students must achieve a level of comprehension, writing and speaking at the level of French VI (Fr 2120). To take the French Placement Test, please contact the First-Year Advisement Centre in Student Services, in the W. A. Murphy Student Centre. During the summer months, the French Placement Test is available through the Department of Modern Languages’ website. Shortly after completion of the Placement Test, the student will be contacted by the Department of Modern Languages and notified of the appropriate course in which to enrol. Students are strongly urged to consider additional work in French.

4. Students should consult with the coordinator of the program when registering, in order to better plan an individual program suitable to their needs and interests.

NOTE: Not all courses listed are available in any given year. Also, some courses vary in their coverage of Canada from year to year. With the permission of the program coordinator, courses with a major focus on Canada that are not on the option lists may be substituted for those listed. Even if Canadian Studies 4110 is offered during the winter semester, students are strongly urged to make arrangements in order to find an advisor and a topic of research during the fall term of their fourth year.

CANADIAN STUDIES CORE COURSES

Canadian Studies 1020—Imagining Canada
Canadian Studies 4110—Research and Tutorial

RESEARCH METHODS

One of the following: English 2040, History 2110, or Sociology 3310

FRENCH LANGUAGE CO-REQUISITE

3 semester hours (French 2120 or above)

OPTION A—CANADIAN INSTITUTIONS

Economics 2120—Regional Economics
Economics 3040—Canadian Economic Problems
French 2610 (or Education 2130)—Introduction à l’éducation en français au Canada
Political Science 2010—Canadian Politics I: Government
Political Science 2020—Politics & Government of PEI
Political Science 2090—Special Topics (only if it’s Canadian)
Political Science 2110—Law, Politics and the Judicial Process I
Political Science 2120—Law, Politics and the Judicial Process II
Political Science 2620—Canadian Politics II: Environment and Processes
Political Science 3020—Canadian Federalism
Political Science 3110—Canadian Public Administration
Political Science 3140—Canadian Public Policy
Political Science 3150—Canadian Foreign Policy
Political Science 3530—The Politics of Canadian-American Relations
Political Science 4010—Law, the Courts and the Constitution I
Political Science 4110—Political Parties and Elections in Canada

OPTION B – ARTS, LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

English 3150—English-Canada Drama
English 3210—English-Canada Prose
English 3220—English-Canada Poetry
English 3230—Littérature canadienne-française I
English 3240—Littérature canadienne-française II
English 3310—Literature of Atlantic Canada
English 3330—L.M. Montgomery
English 4250—Advanced Studies in Canadian Literature
Fine Arts 3210—Canadian Art
French 2210—Langue et lectures I
French 2220—Langue et lectures II
French 2410—French Composition and Analysis I
French 2420—French Composition and Analysis II
French 2520—Le français des affaires
French 3390—Théâtre canadien-français
French 4410—Littérature canadienne-française I
French 4420—Littérature canadienne-française II
French 4430—Culture et littérature acadiennes I
French 4440—Culture et littérature acadiennes II
French 4460—Traduction: anglais-français
French 4510—Directed Studies in French (where Canadian-area related)
Music 4230— Canadian Music I
Music 4240— Canadian Music II

OPTION C—HISTORICAL CONTEXTS

Economics 2210—Canadian Economic History
History 1010—Canadian History—Pre-Confederation
History 1020—Canadian History—Post-Confederation
History 2310—The Atlantic Region
History 2320—The Atlantic Region
History 3250—Canadian Social History to WW I
History 3260—Canadian Social History since WWI
History 3270—Migration to Canada I
History 3280—Migration to Canada II
History 3310—History of PEI—Pre-Confederation
History 3320—History of PEI—Post Confederation
History 3520— The History of Quebec and French Canada
History 3850—Women in 19th Century Canada
History 3860—Women in 20th Century Canada
History 4240—History of Canadian Nationalism and the Canadian Identity
History 4250—Childhood in Modern Canada
History 4260—History of the Canadian Working Classes
History 4890—20th Century PEI

OPTION D—HUMAN IDENTITIES

Acadian Studies 2010—Introduction to Acadian Studies (in French)
Acadian Studies 4910—Special Topics in Acadian Studies (in French)
Canadian Studies 3020—The Canadian Experience
French 3380—Introduction à la société québécoise
Sociology/Anthropology 2520—Aging and Society
Sociology/Anthropology 2590—Special Topics (when Canadian-area related)
Sociology/Anthropology 3120—Rural Society in Canada
Sociology/Anthropology 4310—Minority/Ethnic Groups and Canadian Multiculturalism
Sociology 2110—Marriage and the Family
Sociology 3620—Urban Sociology
Sociology 3710—Canadian Society

The following courses can be included in the above options (check with the Coordinator of the program concerning which option group the course belongs to in a given year).

Canadian Studies 1090—Special Topics in Canadian Studies

Canadian Studies 2090—Special Topics in Canadian Studies

Canadian Studies 3090—Special Topics in Canadian Studies

Canadian Studies 4090—Special Topics in Canadian Studies

Canadian Studies 4510—Directed Studies in Canadian Studies

Canadian Studies 4520—Directed Studies in Canadian Studies

Canadian Studies 1090—Special Topics in Canadian Studies

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN CANADIAN STUDIES

A minor in Canadian Studies is recognized when a student has successfully completed 21 semester hours of courses in Canadian Studies, including CST 1020 and six other Canadian Studies elective courses from at least three different options, at least one of which is at the 4000 level.

Note: Not all courses listed are available in any given year. Some courses vary in their coverage or Canada from year to year. With the permission of the program coordinator, courses with a major focus on Canada which are not on the option lists may be substituted for those listed.

CANADIAN STUDIES CORE COURSES

1020 IMAGINING CANADA
This introductory course examines the creation and renegotiation of Canada’s national identity. Included are the myths, symbols, and stories that have led Canada to be imagined in specific ways. The course is interdisciplinary, drawing on institutional, political, economic, historical, sociological, artistic, linguistic, literary, and cultural perspectives.
Three hours a week

1090 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Canadian Studies at the 1000 level.

2090 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Canadian Studies at the 2000 level.

3010 THE CANADIAN EXPERIENCE
This course is designed to provide an opportunity to examine the development of Canadian culture from the perspectives of a number of distinct disciplines. The themes of colonialism, regionalism, metropolitanism and cultural diversity will provide the basis for this examination. The object of the course is to develop an awareness of the complex patterns of development in Canadian culture from the French period to the present. The course will consist of seminars and lectures by a variety of instructors.
Three hours a week

3020 THE CANADIAN EXPERIENCE
A continuation of Canadian Studies 3010.
Three hours a week

3090 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Canadian Studies at the 3000 level.

4090 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Canadian Studies at the 4000 level.

4110 RESEARCH TUTORIAL AND SEMINAR
This course is required for all senior students majoring in Canadian Studies. The purpose of this course is to provide an opportunity for interdisciplinary research in an area to be determined by the student and a participating faculty member. Readings and research on the course will be supervised by a faculty member. The student is expected to present the results of the research in the form of an essay or a public presentation. This is a tutorial and seminar course.
Three hours a week

4510-4520 DIRECTED STUDIES
These courses are designed to provide an opportunity to examine special topics in Canadian Studies. The content and instructors will vary from year to year; open to both majors and non-majors. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies).

Chemistry

http://upei.ca/chemistry

Chemistry Faculty

Michael T.H. Liu, Professor Emeritus
Brian D. Wagner, Professor, Chair
Alaa Abd-El-Aziz, Professor
Rabin Bissessur, Professor
Nola Etkin, Professor
Russell Kerr, Professor
Barry Linkletter, Associate Professor
Jason Pearson, Associate Professor
Marya Ahmed, Assistant Professor
Fabrice Berrue, Adjunct Professor
Richard Bethell, Adjunct Professor
J. Regis Duffy, Adjunct Professor
Khashyar Ghandi, Adjunct Professor
Christopher Kirby, Adjunct Professor
Stephanie MacQuarrie, Adjunct Professor
Douglas Marchbank, Adjunct Professor
John Riley, Adjunct Professor
Marianne Rodgers, Adjunct Professor

Accreditation received by the Canadian Society for Chemistry National Board for the Chemistry Major and Honours Program.

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

For all courses with both laboratory and lecture components, credit will be granted only if satisfactory standing in both of these components has been obtained.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN CHEMISTRY

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Chemistry must take at least 48 semester hours of chemistry in total and must at the same time complete certain courses as specified by the major requirements.

The required Chemistry courses are: Chemistry 1110-1120, Chemistry 2210, Chemistry 2410-2420, Chemistry 2310, Chemistry 2720, Chemistry 3220, Chemistry 3310, Chemistry 3420, Chemistry 3530, Chemistry 3610, Chemistry 3740, Chemistry 4820 OR 4830 and two Chemistry electives, at least one of which is at the 4th year level.

Additional course requirements for the Chemistry major include the following courses from other disciplines: Biology 1310-1320, Mathematics 1910, Mathematics 1920 and Mathematics 2910; Physics 1110-1120 (highly recommended) or Physics 1210-1220. As well, students majoring in Chemistry are advised to take Physics 2120 (Electricity, Magnetism, and Circuits).

All programs of study of students declared as Chemistry majors must be approved by the Chair of the Department. An outline of the Chemistry major requirements in the suggested sequence for their completion is given below, but deviations from it are permitted provided that the pertinent prerequisites are fulfilled.

First Year

Chemistry 1110-1120 General Chemistry I and II

Biology 1310-1320 General Biology I and II

Physics 1110-1120 (highly recommended) or 1210-1220 General Physics

Mathematics 1910-1920 Single Variable Calculus I and II

Electives (6 semester hours)

Second Year

Chemistry 2210 Analytical Chemistry

Chemistry 2410-2420 Organic Chemistry I & II

Chemistry 2310 Physical Chemistry I

Chemistry 2720 Inorganic Chemistry I

Mathematics 2910 Multivariable and Vector Calculus

Electives (9 semester hours)

Third Year

Chemistry 3220 Analytical Instrumentation

Chemistry 3310 Physical Chemistry II

Chemistry 3420 Advanced Organic Chemistry

Chemistry 3610 Organic Spectroscopy

Chemistry 3740 Inorganic Chemistry II

Electives (15 semester hours)

Fourth Year

Chemistry 3530 Biochemistry

Chemistry 4820 Advanced Research Project OR 4830 Advanced Chemistry Laboratory

Chemistry Electives

Electives 15 or 18

*The total number of electives depends on whether Chemistry 4820 (6 credits) or Chemistry 4830 (3 credits) is taken to fulfill the fourth year laboratory requirement. The Chemistry electives may be chosen from the Chemistry courses numbered: 2020, 2820, 4320, 4410, 4610, 4620, 4640, 4670, 4680, 4690, 4820 or 4830. At least one of the electives must be a 4th year course.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN CHEMISTRY

Students may obtain a degree with a minor in Chemistry by successfully completing the following courses: Chemistry 1110-1120, Chemistry 2210, Chemistry 2310, Chemistry 2410-2420 or Chemistry 2430, Chemistry 2020, and Chemistry 2720.

With permission of the chair, one of the above courses may be replaced with one of the Chemistry 3220, 3310, 3420, 3610 or 3740.

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONOURS IN CHEMISTRY

The Honours Program in Chemistry is designed to provide research experience at the undergraduate level within the BSc program. It is available to students with a strong academic background who intend to continue studies at the post-graduate level in Chemistry or some related field, or to students who intend to pursue a career where research experience would be an asset.

The Honours Program differs from the major in requiring a two-semester research course with thesis report, in the requirement of 126 semester hours for the degree and in the requirement of an additional five advanced Chemistry courses. The following are the course requirements for the Honours Program in Chemistry:

First Year

Chemistry 1110-1120 General Chemistry I and II

Biology 1310-1320 General Biology I and II

Physics 1110-1120 (highly recommended) or 1210-1220 General Physics

Mathematics 1910-1920 Introductory Calculus I and II

Electives (6 semester hours)

Total 32 semester hours

Second Year

Chemistry 2210 Analytical Chemistry

Chemistry 2410-2420 Organic Chemistry I & II

Chemistry 2310 Physical Chemistry I

Chemistry 2720 Inorganic Chemistry I

Mathematics 2910 Multivariable and Vector Calculus

Electives (9 semester hours)

Total 28 semester hours

Third Year

Chemistry 3220 Analytical Instrumentation

Chemistry 3310 Physical Chemistry II

Chemistry 3420 Advanced Organic Chemistry

Chemistry 3530 Biochemistry

Chemistry 3610 Organic Spectroscopy

Chemistry 3740 Inorganic Chemistry II

Chemistry elective (3 semester hours)

Mathematics elective (3 semester hours)

Electives (6 semester hours)

Total 30 semester hours

Fourth Year

Chemistry 4320 Methods in Computational Chemistry

Chemistry 4410 Physical Organic Chemistry

Chemistry 4670 Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms and

Catalysis OR Chemistry 4680 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

Chemistry 4900 Honours Thesis

Chemistry electives (6 semester hours)

Electives (9 semester hours)

Total 36 semester hours

The Chemistry electives may be chosen from among Chemistry courses numbered: 2020, 2820, 4610, 4620, 4640, 4670, 4680, or 4690. The Mathematics elective may be chosen from Mathematics 2610, 3010, Statistics 1210 or Statistics 2910 in consultation with the Chair. As well, students in the Honours Program in Chemistry are strongly advised to take Physics 2720 (Electronics and Instrumentation) and/or Physics 3120 (Electromagnetism I).

Honours students should note that Chemistry 4900 is a two- semester course and carries twelve semester hours of credit. No credit for the first semester will be granted without successful completion of the second semester of the course.

For admission to the Honours Program, students must have a minimum average of 70% in all previous courses; normally the Department expects high second-class standing or first-class standing in previous Chemistry courses. Permission of the Department is also required and is contingent on the student finding an Honours Advisor, on being assigned an advisory committee, on acceptance of the research project by the Chemistry Department, and on general acceptability. Students interested in doing Honours should consult with the Department Chair as early as possible and not later than March 31 of the student’s third year.

To graduate with a BSc Honours in Chemistry, students must complete 126 semester hours of credit which meet the required courses outlined above. As well, students must attain a 75% average in all Chemistry courses combined and must achieve a minimum overall average of 70% in all courses submitted for the degree. Students failing to meet the Honours requirements may apply for a transfer to the BSc Chemistry Major Program or to other degree programs.

CO-OP EDUCATION IN CHEMISTRY

The UPEI Co-op Program is an integrated approach to university education which enables students to alternate academic terms on campus with work terms in suitable employment. The success of such programs is founded on the principle that students are able to apply theoretical knowledge from course studies in the workplace and return to the classroom with practical workplace experience. Students who successfully complete all the requirements of the program will have the notation entered on their transcripts and on the graduation parchment.

Students accepted into the program, complete at least three paid work terms of normally 14 weeks duration, and three professional development courses. Credits earned through completion of work terms are counted as general electives.

The Co-op option is available to full-time students in the Chemistry Major or Honours program.  Applications to the Co-op Education Program are normally made after completion of the first year of study.

See the Co-operative Education Program section of the UPEI Academic Calendar for more information.

NOTES REGARDING 1000-LEVEL CHEMISTRY COURSES

Chemistry 1110-1120 are introductory courses required for, but not restricted to, Chemistry Majors and Honours. A combined average of at least 60% is a prerequisite for all Chemistry courses above the 1000 level. However, this course prerequisite may also be met by the successful completion of a qualifying examination to be offered each year on the first Tuesday after Labour Day. This examination, which shall cover material from both is open to those who have passing grades for both Chemistry 1110 and 1120, but who do not have a combined average of at least 60%. To be admitted to Chemistry courses above the 1000 level, students must achieve a score of 65% on the qualifying examination. The score on the qualifying exam will not replace those attained in Chemistry 1110 and 1120, nor shall it be factored into any calculation of grades for graduation, scholarships or other purposes. This course prerequisite may also be waived with the permission of the Chair for individual courses. This 60% combined average regulation does not apply to students who have received credit for Chemistry 1110-1120 prior to the 2007-2008 academic year.

CHEMISTRY COURSES

0010 INTRODUCTION TO THE ESSENTIALS OF CHEMISTRY
This non-credit course is designed primarily for students needing an introduction to chemical principles, as preparation for first year chemistry. Basic chemical principles are introduced in relation to everyday applications, including industry and the environment. Topics include: matter and energy; elements and atoms; nomenclature and chemical reactions; electron arrangements in atoms; chemical quantities and calculations; acids and bases; and gases. Classes will be augmented by laboratory demonstrations. This course is required for those students planning to take Chemistry 111 and who do not have Grade 12 Academic Chemistry.

1110 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I
This course emphasizes the fundamentals of chemistry. Topics include: atoms, molecules and ions; stoichiometry; mass relations; gases and their behaviour; electronic structure and the periodic table; covalent bonding and molecular geometry; and thermochemistry. The laboratory associated with this course stresses stoichiometry, qualitative analysis, atomic spectroscopy and thermochemistry.
PREREQUISITE: Grade XII Chemistry, Chemistry 0010 or the permission of the Chair in special cases
Three lecture hours a week; one three-hour laboratory period or tutorial a week

1120 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II
This course continues the subject matter of Chemistry 1110. Topics include: chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, intermolecular forces, solutions, chemical kinetics, entropy and Gibbs energy, redox equations and electrochemistry. The laboratory associated with this course stresses volumetric analysis, titration curves and chemical kinetics.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1110
Three lecture hours a week; one three-hour laboratory period or tutorial a week

2020 ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY
This course deals with the major topics of concern in environmental chemistry. Emphasis is placed on the chemistry involved, as well as assessment of the relative hazards and corrective methods available to provide abatement. Topics covered include: atmospheric free radical chemistry, the green- house effect, stratospheric ozone, tropospheric chemistry and photochemical smog, the chemistry of natural water systems, acid rain, indoor air quality, sewage and waste management, chlorinated organic compounds, and heavy metals in the environment.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120
Three lecture hours a week & three laboratories during the term (scheduled during the first class)

2210 ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY
The treatment of analytical data and the estimation of experimental error are considered in detail. Chemical equilibrium, rate and equilibrium constants, abundance and titration curves, complexometric and redox reactions are discussed. The Beer-Lambert law and colorimetry are also examined. The laboratory work includes a selection of gravimetric, volumetric and colorimetric techniques relevant to the theory discussed.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120
Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week

2310 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I
This is an introductory course that deals with the topics of kinetic theory, introductory thermodynamics and thermo- chemistry, phase diagrams, conductivity, electrochemistry and introductory reaction kinetics. The latter includes first- and second-order reactions, as well as methods for dealing with the kinetics of complex reaction mechanisms.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120, Mathematics 1910-1920, or Mathematics 1120 with permission of the Chair
Three lecture hours and three hours laboratory a week

2410 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I
This course introduces students to the structure and reactivity of hydrocarbons and functional groups, stereochemistry, aromaticity, nucleophilicity and electrophilicity, basic types of organic reactions and the application of spectroscopy to structure elucidation.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120
Three lecture hours and three hours laboratory a week
NOTE: Credit cannot be obtained for both Chemistry 2410 and Chemistry 2430.

2420 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II
This course provides a detailed examination of reactivity and mechanisms of organic reactions, including nucleophilic substitution, elimination, addition, electrophilic aromatic substitution, reactions of carbonyl compounds, and rearrangements. Some multistep synthesis and polymers (including biopolymers) are also discussed.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 2410
Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week
NOTE: Credit cannot be obtained for both Chemistry 2420 and Chemistry 2430.

2430 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY FOR THE LIFE SCIENCES
This course is an introduction to organic chemistry for students in the life sciences (and others who do not intend to pursue a major in chemistry). Topics covered include the structure and reactivity of hydrocarbons and functional groups, stereochemistry, aromaticity, nucleophilicity and electrophilicity. Basic types of reactions discussed include nucleophilic substitution, elimination, addition, oxidation/reduction and reactions of carbonyl compounds.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120
Three lecture hours and three hours laboratory a week
NOTE: Credit cannot be obtained for both Chemistry 2430 and Chemistry 2410 or 2420.

2720 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY I
This course introduces transition metals and their coordination compounds. Topics include: isomerism, stereochemistry, crystal field theory and HSAB theory. The course also examines specific reactions such as ligand substitution, oxidative addition, reductive elimination, and insertion reactions. Other topics include: symmetry, point groups, symmetry in spectroscopy, as well as an introduction to bioinorganic chemistry.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120
Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week

2820 INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH
This course introduces students to some of the basic skills required in planning and reporting scientific research. It includes electronic searching of the literature, planning and design of experiments, analysis of experimental data, assessment of experimental error, scientific proof, ethics in research, scientific publications, social media, and scientific presentations.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120
Three lecture hours a week

3220 ANALYTICAL INSTRUMENTATION
This course introduces a variety of instrumentation techniques, and examines the theory, advantages and limitations associated with each. Topics include UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, atomic absorption and emission spectroscopy, operational components of spectrophotometers; electro-analytical methods, potentiometric methods, ion-specific electrodes, voltammetry, liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, spreadsheet methods and statistical software.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 2210 and Chemistry 3610 or permission of the Chair
Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week

3310 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II
This course is an introduction to quantum mechanics and spectroscopy for chemists. Topics covered include blackbody radiation, the photoelectric effect, diffraction, particle in a box, rigid rotor, harmonic oscillator and hydrogen atom in detail. The course will also explore the interaction of light with matter and applications to rotational, vibrational and electronic spectroscopy.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 2310 with a minimum of 60% and Mathematics 2910, or permission of the Chair
Three lecture hours and three hours laboratory a week

3420 ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
This course addresses the application of structure elucidation and synthetic methods to organic chemistry. Topics covered include: enolates, enamines, functional group interconversion, polycyclic and heterocyclic aromatic compounds, cycloadditions, rearrangements, multistep syntheses, and natural product synthesis.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 2410/2420 with a combined minimum average of 60% and Chemistry 3610
Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week

3530 BIOCHEMISTRY
This course is an introduction to biochemistry. Topics covered include the structure and function of biomolecules and their building blocks; protein structure; enzyme mechanism and kinetics; cell membrane structure and transmembrane signalling; thermodynamics of metabolism and an overview of the major metabolic pathways; DNA replication, transcription and translation of RNA for protein synthesis. The tutorial portion of the course focuses on the physical and chemical properties of proteins and enzymes. Students learn modern biochemistry techniques including ion-exchange and affinity chromatography, spectroscopy and enzyme assays.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 2420 or Chemistry 2430
Three lecture hours and two hours tutorial a week
NOTE: Students will not get credit for both Biology-2250 and Chemistry-3530

3610 SPECTROSCOPIC METHODS IN STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS
This course examines ultraviolet, visible, infrared and n.m.r. spectroscopy and mass spectrometry in terms of the physical processes responsible for the energy absorption and ion generation. Problems associated with the recording and interpretation of spectra are addressed and the application of spectral analysis to structural identification is stressed.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 2410/2420 with a combined minimum average of 60%
Three lecture hours and three hours laboratory a week

3740 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY II
This course examines the descriptive inorganic and organometallic chemistry of the main group elements and their compounds. Topics include: periodic trends in reactivity, structure and physical properties. Emphasis will be on molecular chemistry, but there will be some coverage of solid-state compounds such as borane clusters, silicates and aluminosilicates. The course also introduces the crystal structure of metallic and ionic solids, as well as band theory.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 2720 with a minimum of 60% and Chemistry 3610 must be taken at least concurrently.
Three lecture hours and three hours laboratory a week

4050 ADVANCED STUDIES IN NMR SPECTROSCOPY
This course covers the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrometry used in the determination of structures in Organic and Inorganic Chemistry. Major topics include the theory and use of NMR spectroscopy, in particular the use of 2D experiments and multi-nuclear NMR spectroscopy. Particular emphasis is placed on developing the students’ ability to interpret spectra and elucidate the structure of a molecule based on this evidence beyond the undergraduate level, as well as the role NMR has played as a structural tool in the pharmaceutical industry and academia.
Cross-listed with MMS 8050
PREREQUISITE:  Chemistry 3610 with a minimum of 60%
3 hours credit

4090 BIOMATERIALS
This course covers the fundamentals of the synthesis, properties, and biocompatibility of metallic, ceramic, polymeric, and biological materials that come in contact with tissue and biological fluids. Emphasis is placed on using biomaterials for both hard and soft tissue replacement, organ replacement, coatings and adhesives, dental implants, and drug delivery systems. New trends in biomaterials and the recent merging of cell biology and biochemistry with materials is examined.
Cross-listed with MMS 8090.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 3420
3 hours credit

4140 MARINE NATURAL PRODUCTS CHEMISTRY
The overall goal of the course is to provide a description of the structures and biosynthetic origins of natural products of marine origin. The main classes of natural products will be reviewed with an emphasis on their biological origin as a tool to understanding structures. The biomedical relevance of marine natural products will be discussed along with special topics lectures on such themes as “From lead compound to FDA approval” and “Development of a natural product drug lead”. Additional lectures on biological screening and metabolomics as modern tools in drug discovery, and chromatographic purification of natural products will round out the discussions.
Cross-listed with MMS 8140.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 2410 or Chemistry 2430
3 hours credit

4320 METHODS IN COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY
In this class we will review the theoretical foundations of quantum mechanics as well as undergo practical investigations of real-world chemical problems using modern quantum chemical software. Topics include methods in first principles simulations such as Hartree-Fock, perturbation theory, configuration interaction, coupled cluster and density functional theories in addition to more approximate methods such as semi-empirical approaches and molecular mechanics force fields.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 3310 with a minimum of 60%
Three lecture hours a week

4410 PHYSICAL ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
This course examines the qualitative and quantitative relationships between the rates and mechanisms of organic reactions, and the electronic and physical structures of reactants. Among the topics considered are: theory and applications of inductive and resonance effects, linear free energy relationships, kinetic isotope effects, solvent effects, steric effects in substitution and elimination reactions, acids and bases and pericyclic reactions, applications of semi-empirical and ab initio molecular orbital calculations.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 3420 with a minimum of 60%
Three lecture hours a week

4610-4620 DIRECTED STUDIES IN CHEMISTRY
These courses may be offered at the discretion of the Department to advanced students. Conditions under which they are offered and entry will be subject to the approval of the Chair of the Department and the Dean of Science.
(See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)

4640 POLYMER CHEMISTRY
This course examines the synthesis, properties, and applications of organic polymers. Topics include: ionic, radical and condensation polymerizations, as well as the newer catalytic methods.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 2410/2420 with a combined minimum average of 60%
Three lecture hours and a one-hour laboratory a week

4670 INORGANIC REACTION MECHANISMS AND CATALYSIS
Inorganic reaction mechanisms are discussed, with an emphasis on catalytic cycles and the application of organometallic compounds to synthesis. Topics include: basic inorganic reaction mechanisms, catalytic cycles and catalysis, application of organometallic chemistry to modern industrial synthesis and polymerization reactions, and chirality and enantioselectivity in catalysis. Fundamental concepts will be supplemented with material from the current literature to explore the broad range of interdisciplinary applications of inorganic and organometallic catalysts.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 3740 with a minimum of 60%
Three lecture hours a week

4680 ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
This course deals with advanced topics in Inorganic Chemistry. Topics include: bioinorganic chemistry, green chemistry, solid state inorganic chemistry and advanced coverage of molecular orbital theory and bonding in transition metal and main group complexes. This course will also introduce advance spectroscopic techniques, including X-ray diffraction, Mossbauer spectroscopy and multi-nuclear NMR spectroscopy. The current literature is explored to illustrate the broad range and interdisciplinary nature of inorganic chemistry.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 3740 with a minimum of 60%
Three lecture hours a week

4690 MATERIALS CHEMISTRY
This course discusses current topics in materials chemistry. Topics include the synthesis and characterization of intercalation compounds, conductive polymers and their applications, semiconductors and their applications, defects in inorganic solids, and transport measurements.
Cross-listed with MMS 8690.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 2410/2420 with a combined minimum average of 60%, 3310, 3740 with a minimum of 60% in these courses
Three lecture hours a week

4810 SPECIAL TOPICS
A course in which topics or issues are explored outside the core area.

4820 ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECT
A laboratory research course designed to review, unify, and augment the content of previous chemistry courses and to provide an introduction to chemical research. Students will abstract and adapt procedures from the chemical literature and apply them in a one-semester research project carried out under the supervision of a Faculty Member. Components in the evaluation include a written thesis and its oral presentation.
PREREQUISITES: All Chemistry courses of a 3000 level or lower which are required for the Chemistry Major program must be completed or taken concurrently. Entry to this course is contingent upon the student finding a departmental faculty member willing to supervise the research and permission of the department.
Twelve hours laboratory a week (minimum)
Six semester hours of credit

4830 ADVANCED CHEMISTRY LABORATORY
A capstone laboratory course designed to integrate and augment the content of previous chemistry courses in organic, in- organic, physical and analytical chemistry. Students will select and carry out a number of short projects which are developed by faculty members in the various areas of Chemistry. Students will be evaluated on their development of experimental procedures based on the chemical literature, scientific record-keeping, and preparation of reports.
PREREQUISITES: All Chemistry courses of a 3000 level or lower which are required for the Chemistry Major program must be completed or taken concurrently.
Six hours laboratory and one hour seminar a week

4900 HONOURS RESEARCH AND THESIS
This course is a laboratory course focused on a project of original research. The course carries twelve semester hours of credit and is required of every Honours student in their final year of undergraduate study. The project is designed during the second semester of the prior year and intensive experimental work is conducted during the final year, for a minimum average of twelve hours per week, under the direction of an advisor and an advisory committee. The research results are reported in thesis format and are presented orally to the Department faculty and students.
PREREQUISITE: Acceptance to the Honours Program
Twelve semester hours of credit


Classics

http://upei.ca/classics

The Greeks and the Romans laid foundations upon which Western Civilization rests. We owe to the Greeks the roots of much of our literature, science, philosophy and art, while the Romans gave the still living legacy of their language, literature and law to an empire that stretched from the North Sea to the Persian Gulf. To allow the student to share in this rich heritage, the Department of Classics offers courses in the languages, literature, history, philosophy and civilization of Greece and Rome.

Our courses in Greek and Roman Civilization are for students who wish to gain a general understanding of classical antiquity and are the usual basis for further work in Classics. The 2000 and 3000 level courses treat particular subjects and periods, but none of the Classics courses requires a knowledge of Greek or Latin.

There are, however, courses in the Greek and Latin languages for both beginning and advanced students. Those who wish to learn Greek and Latin are urged to begin their studies as early as possible in their university careers.

Students who pass in Classics 1010, 1020, 3120, 3420, 4310 and 4320 may claim credit for these courses in the Department of History.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN CLASSICS

1. A Minor in Classics consists of 21 semester hours.

2. The 21 semester hours must be distributed as follows:

(a) 6 hours in Greek or 6 hours in Latin.

(b) 6 hours in civilization courses; i.e. non-language courses offered by the Classics Department or cross-listed courses recommended by the Department.

(c) 9 hours of electives at the 2000 level or above; at least 3 of these 9 hours must be at the 3000 level or above.

CLASSICS COURSES

1020 ROMAN CIVILIZATION
This course surveys Roman Civilization from its beginnings to the fall of Rome. It examines important political, literary and material creations, such as the Empire, the Aeneid, and the Colosseum, within their historical contexts. The aim is to provide both a general understanding of Ancient Rome, including its contribution to Western Civilization, and a basis for further work in Classics.
Cross-listed with History 2520
PREREQUISITE: None
Three hours a week

2210 CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY
This course surveys the Greek and Roman myths as they are found in the religion, pre-scientific thought, literature, philosophy and art of the Ancient World. These myths helped to make the universe, society and the individual intelligible to the Ancients and have contributed significantly to the art and literature of Western Civilization. The aim of the course is to provide both a general understanding of Greek and Roman culture and a basis for further work in Classics.
Cross-listed with Religious Studies 1210.
PREREQUISITE: None
Three hours a week

2310 EGYPTIAN AND MESOPOTAMIAN ART
(See Fine Arts History 2010)

2320 GREEK ART
(See Fine Arts History 2020)

2410 ROMAN ART
(See Fine Arts History 2110)

2620 PLATO AND ARISTOTLE
(See Philosophy 2620)

2880 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Classics at the 2000 level.

3420 THE LATER ROMAN EMPIRE (A.D. 284-410)
This course gives detailed consideration to the political, military, social, economic and religious history of the Roman Empire from the reign of Diocletian to the sack of Rome by Alaric the Visigoth. Attention is directed to the reasons why the Romans failed to halt the decline of their Empire.
Cross-listed with History 2720
PREREQUISITE: Classics 1020, or 3120, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3880 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Classics at the 3000 level.

4880 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Classics at the 4000 level.

LANGUAGE COURSES

GREEK
1010
This course provides an introduction to the grammar and syntax of Classical Greek.
PREREQUISITE: None
Three hours a week

1020
This course provides a continuation of the study of the grammar and syntax of Classical Greek.
PREREQUISITE: Greek 1010
Three hours a week

LATIN

1010
This course provides an introduction to the grammar and syntax of the Latin language.
Three hours a week

1020
This course provides a continuation of the study of the grammar and syntax of the Latin language.
PREREQUISITE: Latin 1010
Three hours a week

4310-4320 DIRECTED STUDIES
Student and teacher jointly investigate problems or authors or do advanced language studies in consultation with the Chair. May be used as a History credit with approval of the History Chair.
PREREQUISITE: Four courses in Classics (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)

Co-operative Education Program

http://upei.ca/co-op

The UPEI Co-op Program is an integrated approach to university education which enables students to alternate academic terms on campus with work terms in suitable employment. The success of such programs is founded on the principle that students are able to apply theoretical knowledge from course studies in the workplace and return to the classroom with practical workplace experience. Students who successfully complete all the requirements of the program will have the notation entered on their transcripts and on the graduation parchment.

ACADEMIC COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Academic course requirements for the Co-operative Education designation are as follows: COOP 2210, COOP 3210, COOP 4210 are required, three semester hour credit granting work terms (these replace three general electives); and COOP 5210 is an optional work term with no semester hours of credit awarded. Each of the first three work terms are preceded by a required, non-credit career skills course (COOP 2110/COOP 2120, COOP 3110, and COOP 4110), which prepares students for their job search and readies them for the workplace.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Applications to the Co-operative Education Program are normally made after the first year of study. Special application cases may be considered. The applicant must be a full time student in either the Business or Science faculty, and have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.7 in the required program courses and have completed all first year required courses.  Students will be admitted to the program based on their interest, aptitude and assessed ability, to combine successfully the academic requirements with the work term requirements of the given program. Students not admitted may reapply at the next opportunity.

CONTINUANCE REQUIREMENTS

Once admitted to the program, students must continue in full-time enrolment between work terms and maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.7.  An academic review of students’ performance will take place at the end of each semester.  It is also required that students achieve satisfactory performance on previous work terms, as outlined below in Program Requirements. Students who fail to meet these standards or who fail a course(s) will be placed “on notice” for the next academic semester. Students who do not meet these standards for two consecutive academic semesters may be dismissed from the program.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

The University will make every effort to locate work term positions for co-op students in suitable areas of employment, but cannot guarantee work terms. Satisfactory fulfillment of the program includes:

1. The completion of a minimum of three work terms, in approved, academically-related, paid employment situations of 14 to 16 weeks duration;

2.  The completion of three professional development course sections (Career Skills 1, 2 & 3);

3. A satisfactory employer evaluation for each co-op work term;

4. The satisfactory completion of all work term assignments during work terms;

WITHDRAWAL CONDITIONS

Students may be required to withdraw from the UPEI Co-op Program if:

1. They are dismissed from, discontinue, or fail an approved co-op work term position due to a fault on their part;

2.  They fail to complete the necessary professional development courses;

3. They fail to submit or successfully complete the work term assignments;

4. They do not satisfy the continuance requirements including the required cumulative grade point average necessary for continuance in the UPEI Co-op Program;

5. In the judgement of the Co-operative Education Coordinator and/or applicable Academic Director, they are no longer suited for the particular requirements of the Co-operative Education Program.

WORK TERM REGISTRATION

Students are required to register for all professional development courses and work terms by following typical registration processes. The professional development courses and work terms will officially be designated on students’ transcripts as pass or fail.

CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION COURSES

2110 CAREER SKILLS I – PART I
This course offers introductory career skills training to prepare Co-op students for their first work term. This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
PREREQUISITE:  Acceptance into the co-op program
0 credit hours

2120 CAREER SKILLS I – PART 2
This course offers introductory career skills training to prepare Co-op students for their first work term. This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
PREREQUISITE:  Acceptance into the co-op program
0 credit hours

2210 WORK TERM I
This course is Co-op students’ first work term.  This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
PREREQUISITE:  COOP 2110 and COOP 2120
3 credit hours

3110 CAREER SKILLS II
This course offers career skills training to strengthen Co-op students’ readiness for their second work term. This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
PREREQUISITE:  COOP 2210 or permission of the applicable Academic Director of Co-operative Education.
0 credit hours

3210 WORK TERM II
This course is Co-op students’ second work term.  This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
PREREQUISITE:  COOP 3110 or permission of the applicable Academic Director of Co-operative Education.
3 credit hours

4110 CAREER SKILLS III
This course offers career skills training to strengthen Co-op students’ readiness for their third work term. This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
PREREQUISITE:  COOP 3210 or permission of the applicable Academic Director of Co-operative Education.
0 credit hours

4210 WORK TERM III
This course is Co-op students’ third work term.  This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
PREREQUISITE:  COOP 4110 or permission of the applicable Academic Director of Co-operative Education.
3 credit hours

5210 WORK TERM IV
This optional course is available to students who elect to complete a fourth work term.
PREREQUISITE:  COOP 4210
0 credit hours

Diversity and Social Justice Studies (DSJS)

http://www.upei.ca/arts/diversity-and-social-justice-studies

Co-ordinator

Ann Braithwaite, Professor

Diversity and Social Justice Studies responds to the 21st century need for critical engaged citizens who can, through a variety of theoretical languages and methodologies: a) analyze the social construction of identity categories (gender, sexuality, race, class, age, national status, able-bodiedness, species, etc.) and recognize the difference these make to what we know and how we act in the world; b) recognize, address, and challenge global inequities around these intersecting identity categories and analyze how social structures and policies, systems of representation, and everyday practices perpetuate these inequities; c) see the world from multiple points of view at the same time, recognize the complexity of contexts in shaping those views, and understand that both knowledge and visions of social change are always situated and partial. Diversity and Social Justice encourages interdisciplinary approaches and the development of intercultural knowledge through a variety of courses and other learning opportunities. Courses are divided into three clusters: 1) Gender and Sexuality; 2) Identities and Social Structures; 3) Cultural Representation and Analysis.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN DIVERSITY AND SOCIAL JUSTICE STUDIES

Students pursuing a Major in Diversity and Social Justice must complete 42 credit hours (14 courses) in the DSJS Program. These credit hours must be composed of the 2 required core courses in DSJS 1090 and 4040, and 12 additional courses from the list of DSJS courses, with at least four courses (12 semester hours) at the 3000-4000-level. Students must take a minimum of 2 courses from each of the 3 thematic clusters.

1. Core Courses:

DSJS 1090 – Special Topics in Diversity and Social Justice Studies

DSJS 4040 – Theorizing Social Justice

2. DSJS and cross-listed courses:

THEMATIC CLUSTERS

Gender and Sexuality

DSJS 2050 – Sex and Culture

DSJS 2420 – Philosophies of Love and Sexuality (Philosophy 2420)

DSJS 2610 – Sex, Gender and Society (Sociology/Anthropology 2610)

DSJS 3850 – Women in 19th Century Canada (History 3850)

DSJS 3860 – Women, the Law, and Civil Rights in 20th-Century Canada (History 3860)

DSJS 3910 – Psychology of Women (Psychology 3910)

DSJS 4350 – Gender and Sexuality (Psychology 4350)

Identities and Social Structures

DSJS 2630 – Global Youth Cultures (Sociology/Anthropology 2630)

DSJS 2750 – Social Inequality (Sociology/Anthropology 2750)

DSJS 3020 – Constructing Difference and Identity (also Sociology/Anthropology 3070)

DSJS 3520 – Kinship and Family (Anthropology 3520)

DSJS 3810 – Women, Economics and the Economy (Economics 3810)

DSJS 4010 – Medical Anthropology (Anthropology 4010)

DSJS 4510 – Women and Aging (Family Science 4510)

Cultural Representation and Analysis

DSJS 2120 – Food and Cultural Studies

DSJS 2210 – Writings by Women (English 2210)

DSJS 3060 – Transgression, Resistance, Protest

DSJS 3110 – Identity and Popular Culture

DSJS 3740 – Qualitative Research Methods (Psychology 3740)

DSJS 4020 – Cybercultures (Anthropology 4030)

DSJS 4120 – Theories of the Body

DSJS 4560 – Visual Culture (Sociology/Anthropology 4560)

DSJS 4660 – Advanced Topics in Gender and Sexuality (English 4660)

DSJS 4730 – The Rise of Consumer Society: British Society in the 18th Century (History 4730)

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN DIVERSITY AND SOCIAL JUSTICE STUDIES

A minor in DSJS will be recognized when a student has successfully completed twenty-one (21) semester hours of courses in DSJS, including 1090 and six additional courses from anywhere on the list of DSJS courses. At least six semester hours must be at the 3000 or 4000 level.

DIVERSITY AND SOCIAL JUSTICE STUDIES CORE COURSES

1090 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Diversity and Social Justice Studies at the 1000 level.

2050 SEX AND CULTURE
This course examines theories of sex and sexuality, and investigates how they are central to the construction and function of contemporary North American culture. It explores how boundaries between ‘approved of ’ and ‘disapproved of ’ sexual behaviours reflect larger social and cultural concerns, and challenges students to think beyond the more usual either/or ways of identifying sexuality. Topics covered include the social construction of heterosexuality, changing definitions of lesbian/gay/bisexual, challenges posed by intersexed and transgendered people, sex work, sado/masochism, pornography, monogamy, intergenerational sex, internet and ‘cybersex,’ and the ‘feminist sex wars.’
PREREQUISITE: None
Three hours a week

2090 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Diversity and Social Justice Studies at the 2000 level.

2120 FOOD AND CULTURAL STUDIES
This course introduces students to the study of food and its relationships to identities (i.e., gender, race, class, national status), the body, community, popular culture, and politics. It explores how historical and contemporary food production and consumption practices both construct and reflect these relationships and examines such questions as how food is defined and how it circulates to both perpetuate and challenge power and privilege.
Cross-listed with Foods & Nutrition 2310.

2210 WRITINGS BY WOMEN
(See English 2210)

2420 PHILOSOPHIES OF LOVE AND SEXUALITY
(See Philosophy 2420)

2610 SEX, GENDER AND SOCIETY
(See Soc/Anth 2610)

2630 GLOBAL YOUTH CULTURES
(See Soc/Anth 2630)

2750 SOCIAL INEQUALITY
(See Soc/Anth 2750)

2920 WORK AND SOCIETY
(See Sociology 2920)

3020 CONSTRUCTING DIFFERENCE AND IDENTITY
This course examines some of the differences between and among women, exploring how claims to various identities and politics have transformed Diversity and Social Justice Studies. It analyzes essentialist assumptions about identity categories such as race, sex, gender, and sexuality, and examines their social construction and contemporary interconnections at the institutional level.
Cross-listed with Sociology/Anthropology 3070
PREREQUISITE: DSJS 1090, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3030 PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING
(See Psychology 3030)

3060 TRANSGRESSION, RESISTANCE, PROTEST
This course introduces students to concepts of ‘transgression,’ resistance, and protest, exploring what kinds of events, people, and objects are thought to constitute social, political, and cultural practices of these concepts in various times and places. It explores how gender, sexuality, race, national identity, class, age, and abilities have been central to social definitions of–and anxieties about—transgression, resistance, and protest. It also focuses on how people have used these concepts to productively push against the limits of their social positionings.
PREREQUISITE: None

3090 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Diversity and Social Justice Studies at the 3000 level.

3110 IDENTITY AND POPULAR CULTURE
This course introduces students to approaches to the study of popular culture and cultural studies, asking what is meant by the term “pop culture” and exploring it as a site of struggle and negotiation for a variety of identity groups. It explores both how social identities (gender, race, sexuality, and class) are constructed and represented in popular cultural objects and practices, and examines how those can make a difference to how people then interact with and in that pop culture. Course materials are drawn from advertising, popular events and trends, news items, film, TV, fan culture, zines, pornography, and the new communications technologies.
Cross-listed as English 3140 and Anthropology 3100
PREREQUISITE: None
Three hours a week

3320 KNOWLEDGE AND CULTURE
(See Anthropology 3320)
PREREQUISITES: DSJS 109 and one other DSJS course at the 200 level or higher.

3520 KINSHIP AND FAMILY
(See Anthropology 3520)

3550 GLOBALIZATION
(See Soc/Anth 3550)

3710 COMMUNITY BASED ETHICAL INQUIRY
(See Philosophy 3710)

3740 QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS
(See Psychology 3740)

3810 WOMEN, ECONOMICS AND THE ECONOMY
(See Economics 3810)

3840 CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY
(See Psychology 3850)

3850 WOMEN IN 19TH CENTURY CANADA
(See History 3850)

3860 WOMEN, THE LAW, AND CIVIL RIGHTS IN 20th-CENTURY CANADA
(See History 3860)

3910 PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN
(See Psychology 3910)

3950 GENDER AND VIOLENCE
(See Psychology 3950)

4010 MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
(See Anthropology 4010)

4020 CYBERCULTURES
(See Anthropology 4030)

4040 THEORIZING SOCIAL JUSTICE
This capstone course provides the opportunity for students to explore theories and practices of “social justice,” broadly defined, across a number of contexts. It examines how social movements and identity groups have defined this concept, investigates, through a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches, processes towards this goal in addition to barriers inhibiting its attainment.
PREREQUISITES: DSJS 1090 and at least two other DSJS courses

4060 QUEER THEORY
This course introduces students to the body of academic thought known as “queer theory” and to the ways it challenges assumptions about sexuality, gender, and other identity categories. It focuses on queer theory’s historical foundations, genealogies, and contributions, as well as on contemporary uses of and debates in the field.
PREREQUISITES: DSJS 1090 and at least one other DSJS course at the 2000 level or above, or permission of the instructor.

4090 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Diversity and Social Justice Studies at the 4000 level.

4120 THEORIES OF THE BODY
This course introduces students to what is often called “body studies,” exploring a range of theoretical and cultural accounts of the body. Through a variety of interdisciplinary readings and materials, it investigates the centrality of definitions of the body to understandings of the self, identity, and embodiment. It also examines how different perceptions of the body have been central to conceptualizations of sex, gender, race, and sexuality, and looks at some of the social and political consequences of these different perceptions.
PREREQUISITE: At least one DSJS course, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4310 MINORITY/ETHNIC GROUPS AND CANADIAN MULTICULTURALISM
(See Soc/Anth 4310)

4350 GENDER AND SEXUALITY
(See Psychology 4350)

4510 WOMEN AND AGING
(See Family Science 4510)

4560 VISUAL CULTURE
(See Soc/Anth 4560)

4660 ADVANCED TOPICS IN GENDER AND SEXUALITY
(See English 4660)

4720 SOCIAL JUSTICE IN PSYCHOLOGY
(See Psychology 4720)

4910-4920 DIRECTED STUDIES
These advanced courses for qualified students (see Academic Regulation 9) provide for supervised independent or group study of specialized topics in Diversity and Social Justice Studies. The topics offered must be approved by the Co-ordinator of Diversity and Social Justice Studies and the Dean of the Faculty.
PREREQUISITE: At least three DSJS courses or approval of the instructor
Three hours a week

Economics

http://upei.ca/economics

Economics Faculty

P. Nagarajan, Professor Emeritus
J. Sentance, Associate Professor, Chair
W. Rankaduwa, Professor
J. Stevens, Associate Professor
Y. Jia, Associate Professor
Justin Kakeu, Assistant Professor
L. Clark, Adjunct Professor

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN ECONOMICS

Students wishing to major in Economics must complete fifty-four semester hours in Economics and Mathematics according to the program described below. All courses are valued at three semester hours.

1010 – Introductory Microeconomics

1020 – Introductory Macroeconomics

2030 – Intermediate Microeconomics I

2040 – Intermediate Macroeconomics I

3050 – Intermediate Microeconomics II

3060 – Intermediate Macroeconomics II

One of:

3030 – Economic Methodology

3070 – Mathematical Economics

3080 – Introduction to Econometrics

PLUS: Seven (7) additional elective courses in economics, at least three of which must be at the 3000 or 4000 level.

Mathematics

1110 – Finite Mathematics

1120 – Calculus for the Managerial, Social, and Life Sciences OR 1510 and 1520 – Introductory Calculus I and II

Statistics

1210 – Introductory Statistics OR Business 2510 – Introduction to Management Science

Recommendation

Students planning to follow graduate studies in Economics are advised to plan their courses with the Department. Such students should include the following courses as part of their seven electives in Economics: 3070 Mathematical Economics and 3080 Econometrics as well as 4030 Advanced Microeconomics and 4040 Macroeconomics. The Department further recommends that students who wish to go on to graduate studies choose Mathematics 1910 and Mathematics 1920, rather than Mathematics 1120, as a stronger base for additional Mathematics courses. Students should also consider including Mathematics 2610 (Linear Algebra) in their program of studies.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN ECONOMICS

Students wishing to minor in Economics must complete twenty-one semester hours in Economics distributed as follows: Economics 1010 and 1020, and five other courses including at least one of the intermediate theory courses (Economics 2030 or 2040). At least two courses at the 3000 level or above. Students should plan their program in consultation with the Department.

NOTE: The offerings listed below are not necessarily available each year. At best it may be possible to offer certain courses every other year. The courses offered in the current year will be published so that students will have the exact information available.

ECONOMICS COURSES

1010 INTRODUCTORY MICROECONOMICS
This course provides an introduction to the economic analysis of consumer and producer behaviour. Of particular concern is the role of the market in the allocation of resources and the distribution of income, and how these outcomes are affected by imperfections in the market system and by government policy.
PREREQUISITE: None
Three hours a week

1020 INTRODUCTORY MACROECONOMICS
An introduction to the development, tools and application of macroeconomic analysis in the Canadian economy. Topics discussed will include inflation, unemployment, monetary policy, fiscal policy as well as others.
PREREQUISITE: None
Three hours a week

2030 INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS I
The theories of consumer and producer behaviour developed in Economics 1010 are elaborated upon through the application of classical utility and indifference curve and production isoquant approaches. Choice under uncertainty and competitive market outcomes are also examined.
Cross-listed with AMS 2030
PREREQUISITE: Economics 1010
Three hours a week

2040 INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS I
This course explores the national economy in terms of the determination of national output, the general price level, the rate of interest, and employment. It then analyzes the effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policy in achieving specific goals and combination of goals.
Cross-listed with AMS 2040
PREREQUISITE: Economics 1020
Three hours a week

2110 INTRODUCTION TO RESOURCE ECONOMICS
In this course questions concerning the use of natural resources are analyzed using the techniques of microeconomic theory. Issues relating to scarcity and conservation, market failure, inter-temporal allocation of resources, property rights, common property resources, and the environment are discussed from both a Canadian and international perspectives.
PREREQUISITE: Economics 1010 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

2120 REGIONAL ECONOMICS
This course analyzes the problems of regional economic development in terms of factors affecting the location of an economic activity, land use, and migration. Regional disparities and the strategies of the Government of Canada and the provincial governments to reduce them from both historical and contemporary perspectives are also discussed.
PREREQUISITE: Economics 1010 or 1020 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

2150 ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS
This course is an introduction to the field of environmental economics. Students analyze the types of incentives provided by the economic system that lead to environmental degradation as well as improvement. It presents a critical analysis of traditional economic models and introduces alternative ecological models, along with a discussion of such topics as externalities, valuation of ecological assets, and policy development.
PREREQUISITE: Economics 1010 or permission of the instructor
Three hours per week

2210 CANADIAN ECONOMIC HISTORY
This course surveys the history of Canada’s economic development, emphasizing the interplay of Canada’s resource base, the international economy, and the trade policies of France, England and the United States. Topics include exploitation of the staples trades, industrialization, expansion to the west, the Depression, and our legacy of foreign investment.
PREREQUISITE: Economics 1010 and 1020 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

2220 PUBLIC SECTOR ECONOMICS
This course examines the broad nature and function of the public sector, with emphasis on the rationale for the existence of the public sector in a market economy and its impact on resource allocation, distribution of income and economic performance. Topics include anatomy of market failure, types of government intervention to correct market failure, the public good, externalities, and an overview of the growth of the public sector in Canada.
PREREQUISITE: Economics 1010 and 1020, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

2420 THE ECONOMICS OF TOURISM
This course uses economic tools to analyze the role of tourism at the provincial, regional, national and international levels. In-put/output analysis is used to compute local multipliers as they relate to the PEI economy. The role of the hospitality industry is also explored.
PREREQUISITE: Economics 1010 or 1020 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

2510 MONEY AND FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS
This course analyzes the nature and role of money in the economy. It examines commercial banking, central banking, money and capital markets, and other financial intermediaries. Elements of business finance are discussed with particular emphasis on the role of public financial institutions. Also included are financing foreign trade, consumer finance, an examination of public finance, and monetary policy.
PREREQUISITE: Economics 1010 and 1020
Three hours a week

2830 AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
This course introduces students to agricultural economics and the role of agriculture in the economy. It reviews the structure of the food and fibre system from the farm and its suppliers to marketing and consumers. The role of agriculture in development, problems in agricultural trade, and alternatives in market structures and management are among the topics covered.
PREREQUISITE: Economics 1010 and 1020 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

2850 SPECIAL TOPICS
A lecture course in which contemporary topics or economic issues are explored and analyzed in an introductory/general manner.

2910 MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS
Managerial economics is the study of those economic principles and techniques needed in the evaluation, planning and management of economic projects in such fields as natural resources, agriculture, international and regional development. Optimization techniques, process programming, demand, cost and price analysis, and the study of alternative management regimes and optimizing goals are among the topics to be studied.
PREREQUISITE: Economics 1010
Three hours a week

3030 ECONOMIC METHODOLOGY
This course provides a critical analysis of various methodologies used by economists. It introduces students to research in economics by focusing attention on competing economic paradigms and the problem of empirical verification of economic hypotheses.
PREREQUISITE: Economics 2030 and 2040, Statistics 1210
Three hours a week

3040 CANADIAN ECONOMIC PROBLEMS
This course examines selected contemporary problems of the Canadian economy by focusing on the formulation and analysis of economic policies designed to deal with these problems.
PREREQUISITE: Economics 1010 and 1020 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3050 INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS II
An extension of Economics 2030, this course covers price determination in monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly models. Game theory, factor pricing, capital investment over time, general equilibrium, asymmetric information, externalities, and public goods are discussed. The use of microeconomics as a tool in decision-making is illustrated.
PREREQUISITES: Economics 1010 and Economics 2030
3 semester hours

3060 INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS II
This course addresses the theory of inflation, unemployment, economic growth and fluctuations, the determination of the balance of payments and the exchange rate, and monetary and fiscal policies in closed and open economies.
PREREQUISITES: Economics 1020 and Economics 2040
3 semester hours

3070 MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS
This is an introduction to the use of mathematics in theoretical economic analysis. Topics to be considered include utility maximization, efficient production, price and income determination, the adjustment to and stability of equilibrium, inflation, and the impact of government spending and taxation programs.
PREREQUISITE: Economics 1010 and 1020, Mathematics 1110 and 1120. Non-economic majors without Economics 1010-1020 but possessing a strong background in mathematics may be admitted with the instructor’s permission
Three hours a week

3080 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRICS
This course concentrates on effective procedures for the statistical estimation and testing of key parameters in economic models. Remedies are developed for problems associated with model specification. Multicollinearity, serial correlation, heteroscedasticity, simultaneous equations, and forecasting.
PREREQUISITE: Economics 2030 and 2040, Statistics 1210, and either Mathematics 1120 or 1910
Three hours a week

3110 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT (I)
This course traces economics ideas from the Greek philosophers to the end of the classical school in the mid-nineteenth century, in particular the works of Plato, Aristotle, St. Thomas Aquinas, the English Mercantilists, the French physiocrats, Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, David Ricardo, and J.S. Mill. A continuing theme is the relationship between the development of economic ideas and the structure of the society in which the economist lived.
Cross-listed with History 4610.
PREREQUISITE: Economics 1010 and 1020 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3120 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT (II)
This course traces the evolution of modern economic ideas beginning with Karl Marx. It considers Socialist, Neoclassical, Institutional and Keynesian Schools of Economic thought.
Cross-listed with History 4620.
PREREQUISITE: Economics 1010 and 1020 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3240 LABOUR ECONOMICS
From a theoretical perspective this course examines the workings of the labour market under different supply and demand conditions. Topics discussed include labour force participation, human capital investment, unemployment, discrimination and the effects of government policies such as the minimum wage, unemployment insurance, welfare and pay equity legislation.
PREREQUISITE: Economics 2030 or instructor’s permission
Three hours a week

3310 INTERNATIONAL TRADE
This course examines the causes and economic consequences of international trade. Topics covered include theories of international trade, aggregate national gains from trade, effects of trade on the distribution of income, tariffs and non-tariff trade barriers, the basic theory of international factor movements, and commercial policy.
PREREQUISITE: Economics 2030
Three hours a week

3320 INTERNATIONAL MONETARY ECONOMICS
This course focuses on theories of balance of payments adjustment mechanisms and the efficiency of foreign exchange markets. Topics covered include modeling the open economy; the effects of incomes, prices, interest rates and exchange rates on international trade and capital flows; exchange rate regimes, capital mobility and macroeconomic policy coordination; the role of international institutions; and problems of international liquidity.
PREREQUISITE: Economics 2040
Three hours a week

3410 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT THEORY
This course provides a broad theoretical framework for understanding the development problems of developing countries. Topics covered include theories of economic growth and development, sources of economic growth, patterns of economic development, the role of capital and saving in economic development, inward-looking and outward-looking development, and the problem of industrialization in developing countries.
PREREQUISITE: Economics 2040
Three hours a week

3420 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT POLICY
This course focuses on development strategies and policies for the developing world and related controversies concerning IMF-style stabilization packages. The emphasis is on international aspects of economic development, neo-structuralist policy prescriptions, and empirical aspects of the problem of financing economic development. Selected country case studies are analyzed, particularly from Sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America.
PREREQUISITE: Economics 3410
Three hours a week

3520 APPLIED RESOURCE ECONOMICS
This course in applied economics deals with the management of natural resources, with special emphasis on water, fishery and forestry resources. It explains the use of cost-benefit analysis and linear programming in optimizing resource use. It also examines the dynamics of project analysis, the role or projections, and the discount rate.
PREREQUISITE: Economics 2110 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3610 INTRODUCTION TO GAME THEORY
The course consists of an introduction to game theory with an emphasis on economics applications. As such, the course will first present an introduction to the basic ideas and concepts underlying Game Theory. It will then introduce the concepts of strategic decisions in a static setting through games including dominant strategies, Nash equilibrium and mixed strategies. The course will also deal with the analysis of strategic decisions in a dynamic setting through sequential games, backward induction, and repeated games.
PREREQUISITES: Economics 3050 and a course in statistics (Statistics 1210 or Business 2510) or permission of the instructors

3710 THE ECONOMICS OF SPORTS
This course uses economic analysis to examine a variety of aspects of the business of sports. Topics include the structure of sports markets, the value of franchises to owners and cities, competitive balance, salaries, collective agreements, and discrimination. In examining these issues, this course uses models and methods from a variety of fields of economics, including labour economics, industrial organization and competition policy, cost-benefit game theory, public finance, and urban economics.
Cross-listed with KINE 3710.
PREREQUISITES: Economics 2030 or permission of the instructor. For Kinesiology students KINE 2320.
3 semester hours

3810 WOMEN, ECONOMICS AND THE ECONOMY
This course examines the treatment of women by the discipline of economics from both mainstream and feminist perspectives. It includes a review of the feminist critique of traditional economics, as well as an examination of the economic literature pertaining to women and women’s activities. Topics include women in the workforce and the economic analysis of fertility, marriage and divorce, and household production.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 3810 and Family Science 3840
PREREQUISITE: Economics 1010 or 1020 or permission of the instructor. For DSJS students, DSJS 1090, or permission of the instructor. When taken as Family Science 3840, Family Science 2420 is required.
Three hours a week

3820 ECONOMICS OF AGING IN AN AGING SOCIETY
This course examines the microeconomics of individual choices with respect to aging in the macroeconomic and public fiscal dimensions of an aging society. It deals with these matters in the context of economic conditions and policy in Canada.
PREREQUISITES: Economics 1010 and 1020
3 semester hours

3850 SPECIAL TOPICS
A lecture course in which contemporary topics or economic issues are explored and analyzed in an introductory/general manner.

4030 ADVANCED MICROECONOMICS
This course extends and analyzes topics developed in Economics 2030 at an advanced level. These include demand, production and cost theories, competing theories of the firm, factor pricing, and general equilibrium.
PREREQUISITE: Economics 2030, 3050 and 3070
Three hours a week

4040 ADVANCED MACROECONOMICS
This course traces the development of the microeconomic foundations of macroeconomic theory to expand students’ analytical skills by constructing and solving macroeconomic models. Topics may include: dynamic choice, uncertainty and rational expectations, business cycles, fiscal and monetary policy.
PREREQUISITE: Economics 2040, 3060 and 3070
Three hours a week

4050 FINANCIAL ECONOMICS
This course provides an understanding of the economic analysis of the financial system beyond the introductory level. It places particular emphasis on the structure, operation and the role of financial markets, such as money markets, capital markets and derivative markets, and the characteristics of various financial securities traded in these markets. The main topics covered in the course include economic theories of saving and investment behaviour, asset demand and supply under uncertainty, decision making by investors in the presence of uncertainty, portfolio analysis, managing risk, and the models of asset pricing.
PREREQUISITES: Economics 2030, 2040, and 2510, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4120 PUBLIC FINANCE
This course deals with the role of the public sector in attaining an efficient allocation of resources and an equitable distribution of income in a market economy. It focuses on theories of public expenditure and taxation, and emphasizes criteria for the evaluation and selection of public expenditure and tax programs. Special attention is given to Canadian fiscal problems and current policy issues in this area.
PREREQUISITE: Economics 2030 and 2040
Three hours a week

4130 ECONOMETRICS II
This course is a continuation of Econometrics I (EC 3080) intended to introduce students to a selection of estimation and hypothesis-testing methods commonly employed in applied economic research. These additional topics include (but are not necessarily limited to) the analysis of time series, panel data, binary choice models, and basic Monte Carlo/bootstrap methods.
PREREQUISITE: Economics 4110

4210-4220 DIRECTED STUDIES IN ECONOMICS
These are courses in Economics on a variety of topics for students who have qualified for advanced study. Readings and/or research will be undertaken in a variety of specialized areas. The topics offered must be approved by the Chair of the Department and the Dean of the Faculty. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)

4850 SPECIAL TOPICS
A lecture course in which contemporary topics or economic issues are explored and analyzed in an introductory/general manner.
NOTE: The Department encourages students to select “Economic Papers on Island Topics” which may be eligible for a prize from the Prince Edward Island Department of Industry/ ACOA Awards.

Education

http://upei.ca/education

Education Faculty

Ray Doiron, Professor Emeritus
Martha Gabriel, Professor Emerita
Ronald MacDonald, Associate Professor, Dean
Linyuan Guo, Associate Professor
Alexander McAuley, Associate Professor
Tess Miller, Associate Professor
Lyndsay Moffatt, Associate Professor
Sean Wiebe, Associate Professor
John Doran, Assistant Professor
Anne Marie Fitzgerald, Assistant Professor
Carolyn Thorne, Assistant Professor
Omeasoo Wā
hpāsiw, Assistant Professor
Zain Esseghaier, Lecturer
Sylvain Gagnè, Lecturer
Jessie Lees, Adjunct Professor
Jane Preston, Adjunct Professor
Robin Quantick, Adjunct Professor
Carol Rowan, Adjunct Professor
Kate Tilleczek, Adjunct Professor
Elizabeth Townsend, Adjunct Professor

Twelve-Month Post-Degree Bachelor of Education

The Bachelor of Education (BEd) is a 12-month post-degree program consisting of 20 three-hour credit courses in education. This program is designed to provide the variety of courses and extended field experiences through which students can develop the knowledge and skills needed to teach in the modern classroom. It is the opportunity for students to focus their studies in Primary/Elementary (K – 6) or Intermediate/Senior (7-12) and in International, Indigenous, or Adult and Workplace Education.

REQUIRED COURSES:

PRIMARY/ELEMENTARY CONCENTRATION (K – 6)
INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR CONCENTRATION (7 – 12)

ED 4030 The Arts and Social Transformation
ED 4110 Learners and Learning
ED 4150 The Diverse and Inclusive Classroom
ED 4200 Teaching for Science, Technology, Math, and Engineering (STEM)
ED 4490 Introduction to Indigenous Education
ED 4630 Perspectives on Culture and Society in Education
ED 4640 Educating for Global Citizenship
ED 4660 Principles and Practices of Teaching English as Another Language
ED 4740 Technology in Education
ED 4820 Assessment and Evaluation
ED 4961 Preparation for the Teaching Profession I
ED 4962 Practicum I
ED 4971 Preparation for the Teaching Profession II
ED 4972 Practicum II

PRIMARY/ELEMENTARY CONCENTRATION (K – 6)
ED 4230 Primary/Elementary Mathematics I
ED 4280 Primary/Elementary Mathematics II
ED 4320 Primary/Elementary language and Literacies and Multiliteracies I
ED 4330 Literacy and Multiliteracies in the Early Years II
ED 4450 Primary/Elementary Science
ED 4540 Primary/Elementary Social Studies
ED 4480 Social Emotional Learning and Children’s Mental Health

INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR CONCENTRATION (7 – 12)
ED 4130 Multiliteracies Across the Curriculum
ED 4420 Adolescent Social & Emotional Health
ED 4530 Curriculum and Pedagogy

Students take 4 of:
ED 4260 Intermediate/Senior Mathematics I
ED 4270 Intermediate/Senior Mathematics II
ED 4360 Intermediate/Senior English I
ED 4370 Intermediate/Senior English II
ED 4460 Intermediate/Senior Science I
ED 4470 Intermediate/Senior Science II
ED 4560 Intermediate/Senior Social Studies I
ED 4570 Intermediate/Senior Social Studies II

SPECIALIZATIONS
Students may complete specializations (focus areas) in International, Indigenous, Early Learning or Adult Education by completing a six-week practicum in the specified area and one course beyond the 20 required for the BEd as outlined below:

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION
ED 4620 International Education, or
ED 4650 International Development

INDIGENOUS EDUCATION
ED 4510 Integrating indigenous Themes in the Curriculum K-12

ADULT EDUCATION
One of the following:
• ED 3630 The Adult Learner
• ED 3640 Assessment of Adult Learning
• ED 3680 Curriculum Development
• ED 3730 Inclusion and Differentiation in Adult Learning

EARLY LEARNING
ED 4336 Developing Learning and Play in the Early Years (Ages 0-8)

 

Bachelor of Education—français langue seconde

This unique program will provide the variety of courses, French language and cultural experiences and extended field experiences (21 weeks of practicum) through which students can develop the knowledge and skills needed to teach in modern French Second Language classrooms. This program also provides students an opportunity to focus their studies in the Early, Middle, or Senior years.

Students must pass all courses to graduate with a Bachelor of Education-français langue seconde.

REQUIRED COURSES:

PRIMARY/ELEMENTARY CONCENTRATION
ED 4030 Intégration des arts
ED 4060 Comprendre la santé sociale et émotionnelle chez les élèves
ED 4110 Learners and Learning
ED 4150 Inclusion en salle de classe
ED 4200 Teaching for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM)
ED 4230 Primary/Elementary Mathematics I
ED 4280 Primary/Elementary Mathematics II
ED 4450 Sciences au Primaire
ED 4490 Introduction to Indigenous Education
ED 4540 Sciences Humaines à l`élémentaire
ED 4630 Culture et société
ED 4740 Technology in Education
ED 4800 Teaching in a Core French, Immersion and French First Language in a Minority Context Setting
ED 4820 Évaluation en salle de classe
ED 4880 Littératie I
ED 4890 Littératie II
ED 4900 Integration de la langue au contenu
ED 4961 Préparation pour le professionnel de l’enseignement I
ED 4962 Stage I
ED 4971 Préparation pour le professionnel de l’enseignement II
ED 4972 Stage II

INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR CONCENTRATION (7-12)
ED 4030 Intégration des arts
ED 4060 Comprendre la santé sociale et émotionnelle chez les élèves
ED 4110 Learners and Learning
ED 4150 Inclusion en salle de classe
ED 4200 Teaching for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM)
ED 4490 Introduction to Indigenous Education
ED 4630 Culture et société
ED 4640 Educating for Global Citizenship
ED 4740 Technology in Education
ED 4820 Évaluation en salle de classe
ED 4880 Littératie I
ED 4888 Litteratie II – Education en francais II (Intermédiaire/Secondaire)
ED 4900 Integration de la langue au contenu
ED 4961 Préparation pour le profession d’enseignement I
ED 4962 Stage I
ED 4971 Préparation pour le profession d’enseignement II
ED 4972 Stage II

INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR CONCENTRATION (7-12) will take 4 of the following:
ED 4560 Sciences Humaines 1
ED 4570 Sciences Humaines 2
ED 4260 Intermediate/Senior Mathematics I
ED 4270 Mathes 2
ED 4460 Sciences 1
ED 4470 Sciences 2
ED 4760 French Methods
ED 4800 Teaching in a Core French, Immersion and French First Language in a Minority Context Setting

SPECIALIZATIONS
Students may complete specializations (focus areas) in International, Indigenous, Early Learning or Adult Education by completing a six-week practicum in the specified area and one course beyond the 20 required for the BEd as outlined below:

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION
ED 4620 International Education, or
ED 4650 International Development

INDIGENOUS EDUCATION
ED 4510 Integrating indigenous Themes in the Curriculum K-12

ADULT EDUCATION
One of the following:
• ED 3630 The Adult Learner
• ED 3640 Assessment of Adult Learning
• ED 3680 Curriculum Development
• ED 3730 Inclusion and Differentiation in Adult Learning

EARLY LEARNING
ED 4336 Developing Learning and Play in the Early Years (Ages 0-8)

Post-Degree Certificates

Certificate in Adult Education (CAE)
The Certificate in Adult Education focuses on: understanding adult education learning theory and philosophies; becoming aware of the diverse needs of adult learners; and, learning and applying the methodologies and strategies needed to teach adults. The CAE consists of 12 courses (36 semester hours). Three (six semester hour) courses are offered by Holland College, and six (three semester hour) courses are offered by UPEI. Holland College and UPEI offer the required courses on a yearly basis and the electives over a two-year period. All courses are offered in the late afternoon, early evening or weekend hours at Holland College. The UPEI courses are taught by instructors approved by the Dean of Education, UPEI. Courses are offered in each of the four academic terms.

The required courses are:
ED. 3110 Methods and Strategies in Adult Education I (6 semester hours) Holland College
ED. 4220 Methods and Strategies: Instructional Design for Online Learning (6 semester hours) Holland College
ED. 3010 Practicum in Adult Education (6 semester hours) Holland College
ED. 3630 Understanding the Adult Learner (3 semester hours) UPEI
ED. 3620 Communication Practices (3 semester hours) UPEI
ED. 3640 Assessment of Adult Learning (3 semester hours) UPEI

In addition, students will select 3 additional courses from the following Adult Education electives: Ed. 3680 Curriculum, Ed. 3080 Activity-Based Learning, Ed. 3660 Technology, and Ed. 3730 Special Needs.

Certificate in Educational Leadership in Nunavut
The Certificate in Educational Leadership in Nunavut is designed to provide qualified teachers and educational leaders in Nunavut with the background, history, knowledge, skills and attitudes to provide culturally based, effective, and responsive, leadership in the school system. Courses range from the introductory level through to specialized courses that focus on parental engagement, action research and approaches to school improvement that support the implementation of educational legislation and policy in Nunavut.  The program includes three required courses and two electives.

The required courses are as follows:
ED 5090 – Foundations of Transformational Leadership in Nunavut Education
ED 5110 – Proactive Instructional Leadership in Nunavut Communities
ED 5141 – Action Research and Reflective Practice in Nunavut Education (Design)
ED 5142 – Action Research and Reflective Practice in Nunavut Education (Implementation)
ED 5143 – Action Research and Reflective Practice in Nunavut Education (Communication)

And two electives from the following:
ED 5120 – Educational Leadership – Engaging Nunavut Parents, Elders and Community
ED 5130 – Leadership of the School Improvement Process in Nunavut Communities
ED 5850 – Improving Language and Literacy Achievement
ED 5810 – The Inclusive Classroom

NOTEPost-degree certificates must be completed within four years of the first registration in a required course.

EDUCATION COURSES
Please note: Education courses (at the 2000, 4000 and 5000 level) are graded as Pass or Fail. Students must pass all 20 three-hour-credit courses of the program to graduate with a BEd.

2110 INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION
This course provides students with an introduction to education in Canada. Students examine: the purpose of schools, the characteristics of classrooms, the role of teachers, the relationship between schools and society, current issues in education, and teaching as a career and profession. A minimum of 25 hours of school-related experience is a requirement of this course.
Three lecture hours, plus one full morning or afternoon a week for school visits

2130 INTRODUCTION A L’EDUCATION EN FRANÇAIS AU CANADA
This course provides students with an introduction to French first and second language education in Canada with a particular emphasis on the educational system on Prince Edward Island. Students analyze a variety of French programs in Canadian schools, the goals of these programs, and the roles of teachers within them. Students also examine current issues in education and their impact on French language education. A minimum of 25 hours of school-related experience is a course requirement.
Cross-listed with French 2610.

3070 ETHICS FOR ADULT PRACTITIONERS
This course examines professional ethics in the practice of adult education by: exploring the meanings of “professional” and “ethics” in the context of adult education; discussing the ideas and skills that assist adult educators in applying professional ethics to their practice; examining current codes of ethics for adult educators; and, creating individual statements of ethical practice.

3080 INTEGRATING ACTIVITY BASED LEARNING IN ADULT EDUCATION
In this course, learners explore theoretical aspects supporting activity based learning, reflect on personal teaching frameworks, examine and customize a variety of strategies designed to make learning and training active. Using these foundations, participants expand their teaching repertoires by integrating activity based learning with active training, team learning, peer teaching and independent learning, and develop lesson plans and units to be used in adult learning environments.

3090 AN INTRODUCTION TO LEARNING IN THE WORKPLACE
Fostering a learning culture at work is a complex process with many competing demands on both workers and those who train and manage them. This course will introduce participants to current issues and trends affecting workplace learning; key theories of learning, learning styles and motivation for learning in relation to the workplace; core competencies associated with workplace learning; the role of informal training programs and informal learning (communities of practice, mentoring etc.); and process models for workplace learning. Participants will apply their learning and design a workplace learning program that addresses a key issue and concern in their organization.

3110 INTRODUCTION TO DISTANCE LEARNING
This course provides an orientation to the methodologies and varieties of distance education approaches currently available. Students explore learning technologies related to distance education in the form of e-learning, video conferencing, audio conferencing, etc., and apply them to adult learning contexts.

3120 APPLIED RESEARCH IN POST-SECONDARY INSTITUTIONS
In this course, students review the fundamental requirements for a successful applied research program at a post secondary educational institution. Topics covered include: national setting, institutional context, funding, grant writing, communication, research methods, project management, staffing, student involvement, industry partners, and community economic development. As applied research complements teaching activities and enriches the learning experience at post-secondary institutions, in this course, each student develops and presents an applied research proposal suitable for submission to a funding agency.

3130 ADMINISTRATION OF PROGRAMS IN ADULT EDUCATION
This interactive course explores the current state of adult education in Canada and the statutory framework that largely determines the direction and capacity of the discipline and practice of adult education. Students examine the mandates and variety of provider agencies (adult learning associations, literacy networks, community-based and public education agencies, adult high schools, community colleges). The funding of adult education and the constitutional requirements of governments in Canada are considered. As well, the nature of regional differences and needs (e.g. economic and social development) and how the geography and demography of the Canadian landscape challenges the framework and delivery of adult education are discussed.

3140 SOCIOLOGY OF ADULT EDUCATION
This course examines the social and political structures that have an impact on adult education. Students explore the influence of these structures in shaping public policy on adult education, and discuss their significance for program development and implementation.
Three hours a week 

3150 CRITICAL THINKING AND WRITING FOR THE ADULT EDUCATOR
In this course, students in the adult education context further refine their communication skills. Students will develop greater proficiency and effectiveness in oral communication. The assignments emphasize the writing process; the clear and correct use of the English language in developing reflective and critical thought; and writing in various genres, including research, professional documents, and correspondence.

3190 CAREER AND LEARNING PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT
(See Integrated Studies 1930 and University 1930)

3610 CHILDREN’S LITERATURE
(See English 2450)

3620 COMMUNICATION PRACTICES
This course covers both interpersonal and group communication skills necessary for adult learning. It teaches students to express thoughts and ideas in clear, well-defined terms in oral, print, and digital contexts. Emphasis is placed on developing skills in active listening, public speaking, and small group facilitation, as well as in understanding the variables that affect human communication. Participants are encouraged to identify their own communication challenges through study, research, presentation, and self-reflection.
Three hours a week

3630 THE ADULT LEARNER
This course examines the principles and processes of adult learning. Topics include learning domains, the history of adult education, personal experiences, social and cultural factors that affect learning, learning in formal and non-formal environments, professional and lifelong learning, principles and characteristics of adult learners, and Universal Design for Learning (UDL).
Three hours a week

3640 ASSESSMENT OF ADULT LEARNING
This course examines general principles, processes, and techniques of assessment and evaluation that meet the needs of the instructors, learners, and stakeholders. New assessment techniques in the psychomotor domain are expected. Students develop practical experience in designing and implementing strategies for identifying learners’ needs and assessing learning outcomes in the adult, technological, and/or business sectors.
Three hours a week

3650 COUNSELLING THE ADULT LEARNER
This course introduces students to the social and emotional development of adult learners, and explores the theoretical principles underlying vocational and personal counselling. It focuses on the development of practical application of counselling methods.

3660 EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY AND THE ADULT LEARNER
This course explores the implications, both theoretical and practical, of the new abundance of tools, information, knowledge and connections that are possible to support learning in the internet age. Critical classroom topics such as openness in online education, student assessment, academic integrity and collaboration are combined with theory and significant hands on experience. No prior technical knowledge is expected and students will leave the class with strategies customized to their own contexts.
Three hours a week

3670 ENTREPRENEURIAL EDUCATION
This course introduces adult learners to the principles of entrepreneurial education. Students identify enterprising opportunities, and gain experience in planning and facilitating learning by using specialized software to create enterprising educational ventures.
Three hours a week

3680 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT
This course focuses on curriculum development beginning with needs identification, content planning and research, leading to lesson design and delivery. Students develop an understanding of provincial outcomes and standards. Students assess learners’ needs, set appropriate outcomes, plan methodologies and resources, implement program plans, evaluate learning, and reflect on teaching effectiveness.
Three hours a week

3690 ISSUES IN ADULT EDUCATION
This course introduces students to contemporary trends (e.g., societal, economic, political, and social trends), and diversity in the workplace. Also explored is the role of adult educators as change agents in shaping the fields of training, development, and adult education.
Three hours a week

3710 INTRODUCTION TO ADULT EDUCATION
This course surveys the theories and historical practice of the adult education movement. It examines the characteristics of adult education in a variety of contexts, with particular emphasis on Canadian and provincial initiatives and challenges. Changing needs across a wide range of institutional settings within the field of adult education are identified and discussed.
Three hours a week

3720 FACILITATING LITERACY IN ADULT LEARNERS
In this course, students learn to apply the principles of adult learning and current theory and research to adult literacy settings. The course examines various instructional strategies and techniques that develop language and literacy skills in large or small groups, or in the context of coaching. There is recognition that barriers to literacy learning exist and that educators must understand not only the theory and practice of literacy but also the needs and goals of the individuals in a social learning environment.
Three hours a week

3730 INCLUSION AND DIFFERENTIATION IN ADULT LEARNING
In this course, learners are introduced to inclusive education and to strategies and practices for supporting diverse learners in adult education contexts. The course gives an overview of learning differences, social/emotional/mental health, and diagnoses that impact learning. It also provides suggestions for teaching strategies to encourage adults to learn from their strengths and increase independence. Of particular interest are the use of assistive technology, self-advocacy, principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL), and awareness of services available to adult learners.
Three hours a week

3740 TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING
This course presents the theoretical foundation of transformative learning and transformational education, with an emphasis on practical application. It encompasses principles of adult learning coupled with teaching practices that establish leader empowerment. The role of a transformative educator is explored as a paradigm and establishes critical self-reflection as an essential component of teaching practice. Students should be prepared to examine their educational beliefs, values, and assumptions, and the impact of those beliefs on teaching practice.
Three hours a week

3750 MENTORING THE ADULT LEARNER
This course examines effective methods of mentoring adult students in various contexts. The qualities, techniques, and necessary formal structures in facilitated mentoring relationships are studied using readings, case studies, discussion, presentations, and modelling. Students understand the depth of mentoring adults to the extent that individuals perform the role of mentor or assist others in a structured mentoring program.
Three hours a week

3910 FOUNDATIONS OF COACHING
A course which examines the variety of sciences which are the foundations of coaching, such as: anatomy, physiology, philosophy, psychology, and sociology, as well as introduces coaching concerns in a number of popular sports (NCCP Level 1 Theory included).
Three hours a week

3920 ADMINISTRATION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION
A course concerned with the organizational and administrative principles in physical education. Major areas to be examined include: intramurals and recreation, interschool sports, equipment, facilities, and public relations.
Three hours a week

3950 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ADULT EDUCATION
Students investigate special topics that have particular reference to the fields of adult education, technological training and development, trades education, and other related areas. Students are expected to explore and research an approved topic of their choice.
Hours of Credit: 1, 2 or 3 credit hours

4010 DIRECTED STUDIES
This course is available to advanced students at the discretion of the faculty. Entry to the course, course content, and the conditions under which the course may be offered are subject to the approval of the Dean of Education.
(See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies)

4020 MEETING THE NEEDS OF THE YOUNG LEARNER
This course examines topics in education psychology relevant to the early years classroom. Topics include physical, cognitive, social/emotional and moral/spiritual development; individual differences; learning theories and motivation; behaviour; and the legal, ethical, and counselling responsibilities of teachers for supporting students in need.
Three hours a week

4030 ARTS AND SOCIAL TRANSFORMATION (Integration des arts)
This course is an introduction to the Arts and Education. Emphasis is on fostering creativity and critical inquiry through a variety of multi-modal experiences in the arts, the reading of current literature on arts methods and theories, the study of new curricular programs (including the integration of arts with other disciplines), and the role of arts in social transformation.

4040 COURSE CURRICULUM AND PLANNING FOR INSTRUCTION (Planification et programmes d’etudes)
In this course, students will develop the conceptual understanding and practical skills of lesson and unit planning as they pertain to curriculum. Foci include curriculum integration; project based learning; social action curriculum; understanding by design; experiential learning; outcomes and competencies assessment; coupling assessment with instruction; and various theoretical conceptions of curriculum, such as the hidden, null, void, and lived curriculum.
1 credit course

4050 CREATING A CLIMATE FOR LEARNING: EFFECTIVE CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT (Climat organisationnel: Gestion de classe efficace)
The focus of the course will be on establishing a positive classroom climate to help students become responsible for their learning, behaviours and choices. Foci include strategies to promote student motivation, build positive student-teacher relationships, and develop partnerships between parents and school.
1 credit course

4060 SUPPORTING STUDENTS’ SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL HEALTH (Comprende la sante sociale et emotionnelle chez les eleves)
This course will examine the responsibilities of teachers in supporting the mental health of K-12 learners in the contemporary contexts of family, peers, school, work, and the media. Emphasis is placed on challenges such as low self-esteem, difficult emotions, anxiety, depression, eating disorders, bullying, self-injury, and suicide.
3 credit course

4110 LEARNERS AND LEARNING
This course explores the growth and development of learners from early childhood to late adolescence. Topics include physical, cognitive, social/emotional and moral/spiritual development; individual differences; learning theories and motivation; behaviour; and the legal, ethical, and counselling responsibilities of teachers.
Three hours a week

4120 SCHOOL AND CLASSROOM CULTURE
This course will familiarize students with the variety of often contradictory and unnoticed social, epistemological, economic, political, and cultural influences that have shaped dominant beliefs about K-12 schooling. Students will develop critical inquiry skills as they examine educational assumptions and arrangements, with particular attention to their impact on educational outcomes, in their own lives, in schools, and in society at large.
Three hours a week

4130 MULTILITERACIES ACROSS THE CURRICULUM
This course introduces students to the critical, developmental, and pedagogical dimensions of supporting students K-12 as they learn the range of literacies required for life in the twenty-first century.
Three hours a week

4150 THE DIVERSE AND INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM
This course explores student diversity and addressing the needs of a wide variety of learners within the context of inclusive education. Particular focus will be placed on the development of instructional strategies that support all learners.
Three hours a week

4170 MEETING THE NEEDS OF THE ADOLESCENT LEARNER
This course examines topics in educational psychology relevant to the middle and senior years classroom. Topics include physical, cognitive, social/emotional and moral/spiritual development; individual differences; learning theories and motivation; behaviour; and the legal, ethical, and counselling responsibilities of teachers for supporting students in need.
Three hours a week

4180 GUIDANCE IN THE SCHOOLS
This course examines principles, problems and procedures in the provision of guidance services in a school setting. Particular attention is given to such topics as the functions of school personnel in guidance; integration of school and community resources; guidance-testing programs; information services; placement and follow-up activities.
Three hours a week

4200 TEACHING FOR SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATH (STEM)
This course introduces students to the pedagogies, practices, and instructional alternatives that foster acquisition of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes critical to success in the sciences, technology, engineering and maths.
Three hours a week

4210 TEACHING FOR THE HUMANITIES
This course introduces students to the pedagogies, practices, and instructional alternatives that foster acquisition of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes critical to success in the social studies and humanities.
Three hours a week

4220 MATHEMATICS FOR TEACHERS
The course provides opportunities for students to reason and make sense of mathematics in meaningful ways by discovering mathematics through inquiry-based instructional methods grounded in real-life contexts. Content will be drawn from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics five content (number & operations, algebra, geometry, measurement, and data analysis & probability) and process (problem-solving, reasoning & proof, communications, connections, and representation) standards.
Three hours a week
NOTE: This course may be used as partial fulfillment of the Mathematics requirement for entrance to the BEd program, but cannot be used as a credit towards the BEd itself.

4230 PRIMARY/ELEMENTARY MATHEMATICS
This course examines the pedagogy of Primary/Elementary mathematics. Instruction focuses on how children learn mathematics, what it means to engage children in doing mathematics, teaching mathematics through problem solving, and curriculum sequencing. Underlying these foundational ideas for teaching, students will have the opportunity to re-learn key areas of mathematics in a twenty-first century approach to teaching and learning.
Three hours a week

4260 INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR MATHEMATICS I
Building on the pedagogy of mathematics at the Primary/Elementary grades, this course examines the pedagogy of Intermediate/Senior mathematics. Instruction focuses on how students learn mathematics in these grades, what it means to engage them in doing mathematics, teaching mathematics through problem solving, and curriculum sequencing. Students will also have the opportunity to re-learn key areas of mathematics in a twenty-first century approach.
Three hours a week

4270 INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR MATHEMATICS II
This course is a continuation of Education 426, and builds a conceptual foundation for the topics covered in the intermediate/senior years curriculum. Emphasis is placed on the critical examination of the current intermediate/senior years mathematics curriculum in relation to materials and methodologies. Experience in a variety of teaching methodologies is provided in addition to the development of an understanding of the principles and practices of assessment in mathematics.
PREREQUISITE: Education 4260
Three hours a week

4280 PRIMARY/ELEMENTARY MATHEMATICS II
A continuation of Education 4230, this course further examines and extends the pedagogy of Primary/Elementary focusing on how children conceptualize mathematics and instructional methods required to foster children’s numeracy skills.
PREREQUISITE: Education 4230
Three hours a week

4290 MATHEMATICS IN THE MIDDLE YEARS II
This course provides pre-service teachers with an opportunity to design effective learning experiences, to enable students in the middle years to achieve the key stage outcomes of the Atlantic Provinces Education Foundation Curriculum for Mathematics Grades 5 – 9.
PREREQUISITE: Education 4250
Three hours a week

4310 DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION AND INCLUSIVE PRACTICES (Inclusion et differenciation pedagogique en salle de classe)
This course focuses on the design, implementation and assessment of differentiated instructional practices to simultaneously address curriculum outcomes and the significant range of student differences in inclusive classrooms.
1 credit hour

4320 PRIMARY/ELEMENTARY LANGUAGE LITERACIES AND MULTILITERACIES I
This course provides an examination of the foundations of language/literacy processes based on current theories of language acquisition and literacy development. The focus is on six core strands: reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing and representing, as well as balanced approaches to teaching, learning and assessing literacy skills in the Primary/Elementary grades.
Three hours a week

4330 LITERACY AND MULTILITERACIES IN THE EARLY YEARS II
This course is a continuation of Education 4320, in which students use language arts outcomes, materials, methods, and assessment techniques to design comprehensive literacy programs and activities.
PREREQUISITE: Education 4320

4336 DEVELOPING LEARNING AND PLAY IN THE EARLY YEARS (AGES 0-8)
Current theoretical and conceptual frameworks in the field of early years education and how they inform current approaches to the children’s learning from age 0-8 will be examined.
Participants will study play and its major role in young children’s learning, major influences affecting learning and play, methods of observing and studying play, and practical approaches for supporting and facilitating children’s learning in early childhood settings and in grades K-2.  Participants in current BEd programmes and educators from early years settings will develop projects combining their observations in early years settings with practical curriculum activities.
Three hours a week

4340 LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE MIDDLE YEARS I
This course provides an introduction to current theory and conceptual frameworks for language arts, as well as teaching methods associated with teaching language arts in the middle years of school. The focus includes literacy acquisition with core strands of reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing and representing, with teaching methods that develop a balanced approach to teaching language arts in grades 5-9.
Three hours a week

4360 INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR ENGLISH I
This course familiarizes students with a variety of theories, practices, and values for addressing curriculum and pedagogy as they relate to the teaching of English at the Intermediate/Senior level. With a view to being and becoming English teachers, both locally and globally, students will participate in writing, speaking, listening, reading, viewing and representing activities as informed by research and in a range of developmental, socio-cultural, and media contexts.
Three hours a week

4370 INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR ENGLISH II
Building on Ed 4360, placement experiences and a growing expertise in English education, students will critically inquire and contribute to current discussions and practices on the nature and cross-curricular scope of language and literacy. Emphasis will be on sense-making and concept development, effective writing instruction, the interactive/iterative relationship between teaching and assessment, and the evolving social/economic relevance of communication genres, modes, and media.
PREREQUISITE: Education 4360
Three hours a week

4410 INTRODUCTION TO CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT
This introductory course examines the foundational forces (historical, philosophical, psychological, and societal/cultural) which influence the curriculum, and presents various models for curriculum development. Specific references will be made to the PEI scene.
Three hours a week

4420 ADOLESCENT SOCIAL & EMOTIONAL HEALTH
This course will explore the topic of social emotional health of adolescent learners in the contemporary contexts of family, peers, school, work, and the media. Mental health challenges such as anxiety, depression, addiction, and the teaching of social emotional learning strategies will be emphasized.
Three semester hours of credit

4450 PRIMARY/ELEMENTARY SCIENCE
The course examines methods of science teaching in the Primary/Elementary grades. Emphasis is placed on practical aspects of organizing and delivering active learning experiences in science, the reading of current literature on method and theory of science, the study of new curricular programs including the integration of science learning with other disciplines, and the relationship between sustainability and science.
Three hours a week

4460 INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR SCIENCE I
This course provides an introduction to basic pedagogical concepts and skills needed for the successful and effective teaching of science to Intermediate/Senior school students. Using the concepts of general science and the provincial science curriculum, the course examines the nature and limitations of teaching, learning and technology within the Canadian science classroom context.
PREREQUISITE: At least a minor in a Natural Science, or permission of the instructor.
Three hours a week

4470 INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR SCIENCE II
This course examines the development, nature, and limitations of science and technology; the role of science and technology in society; and the teaching of science and technology in the schools. Time is devoted to an examination of the provincial science curricula, innovative teaching and assessment strategies and techniques, and the development of active learning opportunities.
PREREQUISITE: Education 4460
Three hours a week

4480 SOCIAL EMOTIONAL LEARNING AND CHILDREN’S MENTAL HEALTH
This course introduces students to an overview of children’s mental health issues, the core competencies of Social Emotional Learning, and evidenced-based programs and strategies identified for improving students’ social skills, emotional well-being, and academic outcomes.
Three hours a week

4490 INTRODUCTION TO INDIGENOUS EDUCATION
This course is a combination of classroom and community-based learning.  Anchored in L’nu (Mi’kmaq) knowledge, students will learn about ceremony, protocol, Elders and traditional teachers. In turn, these will help foster a mental, physical, emotional, and spiritual understanding of Indigenous worldviews and ways of knowing. This course also introduces Canada’s history of cultural assimilation and genocide imposed upon Indigenous Peoples in Canada. It will discuss why all teachers need to know this history.
3 semester hours of credit

4510 INTEGRATING INDIGENOUS THEMES IN THE CURRICULUM
This course promotes dynamic ways for the public school curriculum to acknowledge more faithfully the histories, cultures, worldviews and teachings of Indigenous peoples in Canada and globally. The importance of developing more culturally responsive pedagogies and assessment practices and more respectful and inclusive research is highlighted. Insights are shared into the processes of recovery for Indigenous communities and the essential supports for their students to experience success at all grade levels.
Three hours a week

4530 CURRICULUM AND PEDAGOGY
In this course students will develop the conceptual understandings and practical skills to design learning in relation to diverse needs. Curriculum foci include inquiry, integration and universal design; pedagogical foci include promoting motivation, building positive relationships, and establishing strategies for students to become responsible for their learning, behaviours and choices.
3 hours a week

4540 PRIMARY/ELEMENTARY SOCIAL STUDIES
This course promotes dynamic teaching methods and inclusive approaches to inspire young learners and to elevate the quality of teaching and learning through Social Studies at the Primary/Elementary levels. Grounded in the needs of twenty-first century learners, this course offers concrete ways to create more vibrant, engaging, playful, supportive and inviting environments for this core curriculum area to give all learners dignity and honour their diverse ways of learning.
Three hours a week

4560 INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR SOCIAL STUDIES I
This course promotes dynamic teaching methods and inclusive approaches to inspire learners in grades 7-12 and to elevate the quality of teaching and learning through Social Studies at the Intermediate/Senior levels. Grounded in the needs of twenty-first century learners, this course offers concrete ways to create more vibrant, engaging, playful, supportive and inviting environments for this core curriculum area to give all learners dignity and honour their diverse ways of learning.
Three hours a week

4570 INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR SOCIAL STUDIES II
This course develops a rationale, framework and procedures for facilitating thematic teaching and learning on critical social issues appropriate for grades 7-12. Skills in curriculum development are refined as students explore authentic assessment practices and ways of promoting student ownership of and co-responsibility for learning.
PREREQUISITE: Education 4560
Three hours a week

4590 ENTERPRISE EDUCATION
This course introduces the key principles and components of Learning For Enterprise, an international movement that nurtures initiative, self-determination, creativity and innovation in twenty-first century learners. A workshop design engages participants in classroom and community-based challenges that contribute to learners’ confidence in self and community as they apply enterprising capabilities in a wide range of contexts throughout their lives. Specific applications to historically dependent cultures are explored.
Three hours a week

4620 INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION
This course introduces students to the economic, political, and cultural factors that influence public education in foreign countries. The public school systems of selected foreign countries are examined and compared to the provincial systems in Canada. Students are expected to carry out independent research on a foreign country of their choosing.
Three hours a week

4630 PERSPECTIVES ON CULTURE AND SOCIETY IN EDUCATION (culture et societe)
This course introduces students to the visible and invisible impact of culture and society on education. As students develop an understanding of cultural and social perspectives in education, they examine the roles of schools in the proliferation of social and cultural norms as well as their potential as sites for change.
2.5 credit course

4640 EDUCATING FOR GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP
This course is intended to broaden pre-service teachers’ theoretical and pedagogical perspectives on global citizenship education by gaining an enhanced awareness of a world view that recognizes the interdependence and interconnections of the natural and social worlds. Participants will be introduced to the concept of global citizenship and, from this, develop an understanding of social justice, diversity, socio-cultural responsibility, sustainability, and agency. Demonstrating how to integrate global citizenship into educational practices is a key learning outcome of this course.
2.5 credit course

4650 INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
This course introduces students to the history of international development and explores the models of development currently employed. Particular attention is given to the effects of economic, political, environmental, and cultural development on public education in emerging countries.
Three hours a week

4660 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES OF TEACHING ENGLISH AS AN ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE
This course explores the theoretical foundations for teaching English as a second/additional language (ESL/EAL). Students are introduced to fundamental aspects of additional language acquisition and the factors affecting language learning and teaching. The course introduces the needs of English language learners in various contexts including ESL/EAL, mainstream and foreign language classrooms. Students develop a critical perspective on issues related to language learning and teaching.
Three hours a week

4670 APPROACHES AND METHODS FOR TEACHING ENGLISH AS AN ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE
This course provides students with the foundations to facilitate language classes in contexts including ESL/EAL, mainstream and foreign language classrooms. The course introduces a range of English language teaching approaches and methodologies and addresses techniques specific to teaching listening, speaking, writing, reading, vocabulary and grammar in an additional language.
PREREQUISITE: Education 4660
Three hours a week

4680 SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY
This course examines the historical and cultural roles of the rural school. Emphasis is placed on the evolving role of the school as a community resource centre.
Three hours a week

4690 SPECIAL TOPICS
To create a category for uniquely titled courses offered by a department and put on the timetable as a “special course” on a one-time basis.
Hours of Credit: 1, 2 or 3 credit hours

4710 ADMINISTRATION IN EDUCATION
This course is an introduction to the theory and practices of administration in education which includes an analysis of the nature of school organizations, effective administrative processes, the administrative structure of education on PEI, and legal issues in administration.
PREREQUISITE: Permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4730 COMMUNICATIONS
An introductory course covering both interpersonal and group communication, aimed at teaching the student to think and to express ideas in lucid and well-defined terms. The emphasis will be on the workshop approach involving constant practice in the techniques of voice and speech, public speaking, classroom drama, and creative movement. This should encourage in the students a flexible and resourceful attitude, and help them to develop self-confidence, together with the awareness and sensitivity needed for teaching.
Three hours a week

4740 TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION
This course provides an introduction to the integration of digital technologies into teaching and learning. The focus is on use of technology as a tool to support the school curriculum. Web-based communication and work with web-based resources is an essential component.
1 semester hour of credit

4750 ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION
This course provides an opportunity to explore, develop and post web-based resources. Digital photography, digital video, and other emerging technologies are explored and applied within the educational context.
PREREQUISITE: Education 4740 or permission of instructor.
Three hours a week

4760 FRENCH METHODS I
In this course, students explore the curriculum and teaching of core French in the intermediate and secondary schools. Students develop a variety of teaching methodologies in the area of core French.
PREREQUISITE: At least a minor in French, or permission of instructor.
Three hours a week

4790 COMPÉTENCES LANGAGIÈRES EN CONTEXT ÉDUCATIF-PARTIE 2
This course is a continuation of ED 4930. Participants will continue to enhance their language skills through the same type of activities as the previous course.
PREREQUISITE: ED 4930
Three semester hours of credit

4800 TEACHING IN A CORE FRENCH, IMMERSION AND FRENCH FIRST LANGUAGE IN A MINORITY CONTEXT SETTING
In this course, students will examine the similarities and differences when teaching Core French, Immersion and French First language in a minority setting. This course will outline the guidelines and practices/strategies used in each of these three setting in the public school system.
2.5 semester hours of credit

4810 STATISTICS IN EDUCATION
This course is an introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics required to understand, interpret, express, and evaluate the results of measurement in education. Topics included are frequency distributions, histograms, frequency polygons, mean, median for grouped and raw data, normal distributions, standard deviation, normal approximation of a binomial random variable, random sampling and sampling distributions, estimation of means, confidence intervals, student distribution, small and large samples, one- and two-tail tests of hypotheses, correlation and regression, Chi-square test, analysis of variance.
Three hours a week

4820 ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION
This course examines the complexity of assessment by contrasting assessment theories with common practices in the classroom. Students explore the concept of a balanced assessment program that integrates formative and summative assessment practices. Students develop skills in creating a variety of assessment instruments (e.g., observation check-lists, tests, rubrics, portfolios). Issues and practices of large-scale assessment are also explored.
Three hours a week

4850 PÉDAGOGIE EN IMMERSION: LES PRINCIPES DE BASE
This course explores the general pedagogical principles and techniques of content-based teaching in French Immersion at all levels. Topics covered include development of language skills, thematic teaching in immersion, integrating form and content in immersion, and strategy instruction in immersion. This course is taught entirely in French and students are required to complete all assignments in French.
PREREQUISITE: Students must have completed at least six courses (18 credit hours) in French studies in a recognized university program or have been educated in a francophone university for at least two years. Students must also meet the minimum standard, as determined by the Faculty of Education, on a French proficiency test administered before admission to the program.

4860 DIDACTIQUE DU FRANÇAIS LANGUE SECONDE: UNE INTRODUCTION
This course explores the general pedagogical principles and techniques of communicative-experiential teaching in core and immersion French programs at all levels. Topics covered include three-stage lesson planning, personalization, pedagogical grammar, and culture teaching. This course is taught entirely in French and students are required to complete all assignments in French.
PREREQUISITE: Students must have completed at least six courses (18 credit hours) in French studies in a recognized university program or have been educated in a francophone university for at least two years.

4870 L’ACQUISITION DES LANGUES SECONDES
This course explores students’ past experiences and beliefs about language learning and teaching, principal theories related to second language acquisition, and practical applications of theory to classroom contexts in French Immersion and core French at all levels. This course is taught entirely in French and students are required to complete all assignments in French.
PREREQUISITE: Students must have completed at least six courses (18 credit hours) in French studies in a recognized university program or have been educated in a francophone university for at least two years or with instructor’s permission.
2.5 credit course

4880 LITTÉRATIE I
This course introduces students to the general pedagogical principles and techniques of literacy development in French first and second language contexts at the early, middle and senior years. Using materials available in schools and applying appropriate methods and assessment techniques, students design programs and activities based on the learning outcomes in the Atlantic Provinces Education Foundation French Immersion Curriculum. This course is taught entirely in French and all assignments are completed in French.
Three hours a week

4888 LITTÉRATIE – ÉDUCATION EN FRANÇAIS II (Intermédiaire/Secondaire)
This course allows students to continue to explore the theoretical foundations and practices in the field of literacy. Students build their understanding of reading and writing processes by exploring the characteristics, needs, and practices that are unique to learners who are in the process of becoming autonomous or advanced on the development continuum of readers and writers. Students continue to learn the components of an effective literacy program, including those that allow for instructional differentiation, such as writing and reading workshops and reading circles / clubs. In addition, students appropriate practices and resources that develop literacy skills and competencies across subject areas.
PREREQUISITE:  Education 4880
3 credit course

4890 LITTÉRATIE II (primaire–élémentaire)
This course explores and deepens students’ understanding of the pedagogical principles and techniques of literacy development in French first and second language contexts at the early, middle and senior years. Using materials available in schools and applying appropriate methods and assessment techniques, students design programs and activities based on the learning outcomes in the Atlantic Provinces Education Foundation French Immersion Curriculum. This course is taught entirely in French and all assignments are completed in French.
PREREQUISITE:  Education 4880

4900 INTÉGRATION DE LA LANGUE AU CONTENU
This course will provide a foundation for the integration of language and content taught in French first and second language programs. Through examination and application of different models, students will develop competence in the integration of context and language.

4910 SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION
This course involves an analysis of the reciprocal relations between school and society. It examines the influence of political and economic structures in shaping the education systems of various societies, as well as the relevance of different types of schooling in facilitating political and economic participation and cultural enrichment. Empirical attention is given to societies at various levels of general development, with particular emphasis on Canada.
PREREQUISITE: A university degree or two courses in Sociology and at least third year status or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4930 FRENCH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY IN A SCHOOL SETTING/LES COMPÉTENCES LANGAGIÈRES EN CONTEXTE ÉDUCATIF
This course will provide current and future teachers of French as an additional language with the opportunity to enhance their language skills. This will be accomplished through speaking, listening, reading, writing, and viewing. The course will also include a grammar component. Activities will be of a reflective, interactive, and practical nature.
3 semester hours of credit

4950 INQUIRY AND ACTION I
Through on-campus seminars and five weeks of school placement, students will observe,  experience and reflect upon the various roles and responsibilities that a teacher has within the classroom and school and the impact of teaching on learners. They will begin to plan and teach lessons under the guidance of mentor teachers. Using an ePortfolio, they will begin to document their personal and professional growth as
educators.
Three hours a week

4960 TEACHING PRACTICES I
Through on-campus seminars, and nine weeks of in-school observation and school experience, students will gain in-class experience in organizing and managing a classroom, and planning and teaching effective lessons. They will use strategies developed in coursework to facilitate and assess student learning. Feedback from the mentor teacher and faculty advisor will inform self-assessment and personal and professional growth. Students, using an ePortfolio, will document their personal and professional growth as educators.
6 credit course

4961 PREPARATION FOR THE TEACHING PROFESSION I
Through a series of seminars and in-school observation, students will prepare for the role for a professional career. Topics will include teaching philosophy, classroom management and organization, teacher resilience, legal and ethical responsibilities, e-portfolio preparation, preparation for in-school experience, teacher certification, resume writing, questioning and presentation skills.
Three credit hours

4962 PRACTICUM I
Students will complete a 9 week teaching placement in a PEI public school with the guidance of a practicum Faculty advisor and a host mentor teacher. Students undertake planning and teaching effective lessons, develop personal classroom management strategies, and use strategies from methods courses to facilitate and assess student learning. Feedback from the host mentor teacher and faculty advisor will inform self- assessment and personal professional growth.
Three credit hours

4970 TEACHING PRACTICES II
On-campus seminars and eleven weeks of practicum placement will deepen their knowledge and practice required to meet the diverse learning needs of students within the classroom setting. Students effectively plan, implement, and assess adaptations and modifications required for optimal learning by individuals and the entire group. Students will further develop skills in classroom management and organization. In addition, the seminars will assist students in preparing for their chosen profession. ePortfolios will be completed and presented to meet course and program requirements.
6 credit course

4971 PREPARATION FOR THE TEACHING PROFESSION II
Through a series of seminars, students will continue preparing for a professional career in education. Topics from ED 4961 will continue to be developed and will also include job interviews, student referrals and supports, relationships within schools and community, and final preparations and submissions of an e-portfolio.
Three credit hours

4972 PRACTICUM II
Students will complete a 10 week teaching placement with the guidance of a Faculty practicum advisor and a host mentor. Students will further develop planning and teaching effective lessons, themes and unit plans, personal classroom management skills, and assessment. Professional growth will be demonstrated through the presentation of an e-portfolio.
PREREQUISITE:  Education 4960
Three credit hours

4980 ADVOCACY II – BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL
On-campus seminars and six weeks of practicum placement will prepare students for professional certification in contexts chosen to deepen their knowledge and practice. ePortfolios will be completed and presented to meet course and program requirements.
PREREQUISITE: Education 4970
Three hours a week

5090 FOUNDATIONS OF TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADERSHIP IN NUNAVUT EDUCATION
This course reviews the history and world view of the Inuit, with particular emphasis on culture, educational history, struggles with power and privilege, beliefs, values, and principles relevant to Nunavut. Traditional and contemporary views on leadership are studied as participants develop a deeper understanding of the cultural context in which they live and work as educational leaders. Participants examine the directions and philosophies established in Nunavut, including ties to the environment and practices that facilitate transformational educational leadership.
Three semester hours

5110 PROACTIVE INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP IN NUNAVUT COMMUNITIES
The responsibilities, roles, and tasks of principals and other educational leaders are explored as they relate to the creation of a positive, inclusive, collaborative, and culturally responsive school community. The role of leadership in teaching and learning and building positive relationships, both in and outside school, is examined as a key factor in facilitating the academic achievement and well-being of learners. A variety of culturally appropriate facilitation strategies are introduced as participants analyze the legal, moral, ethical and policy rights of learners and educators in maintaining and strengthening culture and language and promoting success in schools, the local community, and the world beyond.
Three semester hours

5120 EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP—ENGAGING NUNAVUT PARENTS, ELDERS, AND COMMUNITY
This course focuses on the development of collaborative relationships, positive communication, and empowerment of parents, elders, and community members who lead, support, and guide education in Nunavut. Participants discuss approaches that respond to and involve the community, and build accountability in ways that are transparent and reciprocal. The involvement of the extended community in the daily life and long-term vision of the school provides a central focus as participants reflect on, and write about, the process of creating collaborative learning communities with parents, caregivers, and elders based on cultural values, beliefs, and principles.
Three semester hours

5130 LEADERSHIP OF THE SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PROCESS IN NUNAVUT COMMUNITIES
Policy implementation, supervision of teaching and the leadership of learning, staff evaluation, and program accountability play a key role in transformational educational leadership and are a major focus in this course. Participants discuss and write extensively about policy implementation that is culturally and linguistically responsive in promoting learning. Participants are challenged to develop skill sets they require to involve the community and parents in developing and implementing a vision for education based on current policies.
Three semester hours

5140 REFLECTIVE PRACTICE IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP FOR NUNAVUT
Participants propose, develop, and implement an approved reflective inquiry project based on their own educational practice.
Three semester hours

ED 5141 ACTION RESEARCH AND REFLECTIVE PRACTICE IN NUNAVUT EDUCATION (DESIGN)
Participants design and develop a reflective practice and/or action research project. The course will focus on developing action research and reflective practice approaches leading to the development of a Government of Nunavut approved research project plan (literature review, methodology, and ethics approval), which would be conducted in Education 5142.
One semester hour

ED 5142 ACTION RESEARCH AND REFLECTIVE PRACTICE IN NUNAVUT EDUCATION (IMPLEMENTATION)
Participants conduct an approved reflective practice and/or action research project. The course will consist of highly individualized online instruction where instructors support participants in the implementation of their research projects through local District Education Authority approvals, intervention implementation, data collection, analysis and academic report writing, with the final dissemination of results conducted in ED 5143.
PREREQUISITE:  Education 5141
One semester hour

ED 5143  ACTION RESEARCH AND REFLECTIVE PRACTICE IN NUNAVUT EDUCATION (COMMUNICATION)
Participants disseminate and defend the findings from their research project as a means of evaluating their own Educational Leadership.
PREREQUISITE:  Education 5142
One semester hour

5590 SPECIAL TOPICS IN EDUCATION
In this course, students investigate special topics in the field of education. Permission of the Coordinator of Graduate Studies and the Dean is required.
Hours of Credit: 1, 2 or 3 credit hours

5730 CHILDREN’S LITERATURE IN EDUCATION
An introduction to, and survey of, children’s literature with emphasis on contemporary books written for children. These include picture books, fiction, and nonfiction with special consideration of Canadian titles. Students examine, read, evaluate, and discuss different forms of literature and various genres of fiction, as well as the ways children’s literature is integrated into contemporary school curriculum.
Three hours a week

5740 YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE
An introduction to young adult literature with emphasis on contemporary books written for adolescents. These include picture books, fiction, and nonfiction with special consideration of Canadian titles. Students examine, read, evaluate, and discuss young adult books and explore the ways young adult literature is integrated into contemporary school curriculum.
Three hours a week

5750 ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT OF LEARNING RESOURCES
This course provides opportunities to consider principles of analysis, appraisal, and review of learning resources. Students develop criteria for evaluating and selecting a wide range of both print and non-print learning resources, and to formulate policies and procedures for the selection of learning resources to support the instructional program in the school.
Three hours a week

5810 THE INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM
Teachers examine the emergence of inclusive education and explore the history of services to children with special needs and attitudes teachers bring to the classroom. Recent research and practice in inclusive education is explored by the students.
Three hours a week

5820 ASSESSMENT OF INDIVIDUAL LEARNERS
Teachers are introduced to individualized educational assessment of children with learning needs and become familiar with a variety of assessment tools and their implementation.
Three hours a week

5830 DIFFERENTIATION AND INDIVIDUALIZED INSTRUCTION
This course introduces teachers to differentiation of curriculum and a variety of teaching methods for learners with exceptional needs, as well as the components and implementation of an individualized educational plan.
Three hours a week

5840 LEADERSHIP AND COLLABORATION
Teachers explore inclusive teaming and classroom consultation as methods to promote inclusive education. Leadership traits required to facilitate the development of an inclusive school is also explored.
Three hours a week

5850 IMPROVING LANGUAGE AND LITERACY ACHIEVEMENT
This course looks at strategies teachers can employ to develop language and literacy skills in the students in their classrooms. Current research in this area is presented and critiqued.
Three hours a week

5910 DIRECTED STUDIES
In this course, individual students pursue a special topic or issue in education. Before approval is granted, each student must prepare a detailed outline of the contents of the course, and obtain the consent of a faculty member to supervise the work.
PREREQUISITE/CO-REQUISITE: Permission of the Dean and Coordinator of Graduate Studies, and permission of instructor.
Three semester hours of credit

Faculty of Sustainable Design Engineering

http://upei.ca/engineering

Engineering Faculty
Nicholas Krouglicof, Professor, Dean
Anna Demeo, Associate Professor
Amy Hsiao, Associate Professor
Trung Ngo, Associate Professor
Wayne Peters, Associate Professor
Andrew Swingler, Associate Professor
Andrew Trivett, Associate Professor
Bishnu Acharya, Assistant Professor
Ali Ahmadi, Assistant Professor
Marya Ahmed, Assistant Professor
Nadja Bressan, Assistant Professor
Aitazaz Farooque, Assistant Professor
Matthew Hall, Assistant Professor
Grant McSorley, Assistant Professor
Elizabeth Osgood, Assistant Professor

Overview

The Faculty of Sustainable Design Engineering at UPEI offers a progressive and innovative four-year Bachelor of Science in Engineering (Sustainable Design Engineering) degree which recognizes the need for a broad and balanced engineering education. The program follows current trends in engineering education and focuses on student outcomes. Small class sizes within an activity-based learning environment allow faculty and staff to be student-centric and to provide specific and timely input to individual students.

Students are exposed to a broad base of knowledge and skills in engineering science, natural science, mathematics, and complementary studies in concert with an applied project-based design stream simulating the engineering profession. Students entering the degree program will be actively engaged in the profession of engineering from day one, providing creative and sustainable solutions to society’s problems. The degree program is designed to provide a highly flexible learning environment that is responsive to the dynamic needs of students and the industries that employ them.

In addition to fundamental science, engineering science and mathematics courses, students are required to develop skills in engineering design, communication, analysis, project management, professional ethics and more. With a solid grounding in these fundamentals, students in Program Years 3 and 4 can enhance their technical knowledge by choosing courses from among three engineering focus areas: Mechatronics (MT), Sustainable Energy (SE), or Bioresources (BR).

Engineered by Design

It is increasingly recognized that understanding basic science and mathematics are only two of the many areas that are essential to professional engineering practice. Engineering students in this program must make responsible decisions based on good judgment and an ability to justify decisions within a structured analytical framework.  Based on this generalist philosophy, this program is designed to develop a student’s ability to think. This fundamental requirement of engineers to think critically in response to ever-changing and complex situations is accomplished through a design stream core which relies heavily on inquiry-based learning supported by traditional lecture-based knowledge. The progression in complex thinking skills occurs over the duration of the four-year program and beyond through appreciation of lifelong learning and professional development.

An integrated, stream of project-based design clinic courses through all four-years of the program provides students with the opportunity to develop knowledge and skills through working on real community and industry-based projects.  Traditional content courses are delivered via an integrated and timely approach so that professional practice skills are developed in a simulated workplace environment. This program emphasizes design as an essential element of engineering as reflected in the Community Design Program (Year 1), and the Junior Design (Year 2) and Senior Design (Years 3 and 4) Clinics.

The following core design courses must be taken in succession to support the students’ developing skills.

Community Design Program (Program Year 1)
Engineering 1210—Engineering Communications
Engineering 1220—Engineering Analysis

Junior Design Clinic (Program Year 2)
Engineering 2210—Engineering Projects I
Engineering 2220—Engineering Projects II

Senior Design Clinics (Program Years 3 and 4)
Engineering 3710—Project-Based Professional Practice I
Engineering 3720—Project-Based Professional Practice II
Engineering 4710—Project-Based Professional Practice III
Engineering 4720—Project-Based Professional Practice IV

Sustainable Design Engineering Degree

Students are strongly encouraged to meet with a faculty advisor early in the program to review course selection. The following is the course sequence for the four-year degree. A five-year degree sequence is also available. Please note that a 60% minimum grade is required in each of the following courses to proceed to the next course: Engineering 1210, 1220, 2210, 2220, 3710, 3720 and 4710.

Program Year 1—Term 1
Engineering 1210—Engineering Communications
Engineering 1230—Engineering Mechanics I: Statics
Engineering 1410—Sustainability in Engineering Design
Chemistry 1110—General Chemistry I
Mathematics 1910—Single Variable Calculus I
UPEI 1010—Writing Studies

Program Year 1—Term 2
Engineering 1220—Engineering Analysis
Engineering 1250—Materials Science
Engineering 1310—Computer Programming with Engineering Applications
Engineering 1340 – Engineering Mechanics II: Dynamics
Mathematics 1920—Single Variable Calculus II
One (1) humanities elective (courses typically offered by the Faculty of Arts, except language acquisition or economics courses)

Program Year 2—Term 3
Engineering 2110—Statistics for Engineering Applications
Engineering 2210—Engineering Projects I
Engineering 2310—Strength of Materials
Engineering 2610—Thermo Fluids I: Thermodynamics
Engineering 2810—Electric Circuits
Mathematics 2910—Multivariable and Vector Calculus

Program Year 2—Term 4
Engineering 2220—Engineering Projects II
Engineering 2360—Materials, Mechanics, and Manufacturing
Engineering 2620—Thermo Fluids II: Fluid Mechanics
Engineering 2830—Digital Logic Design
Mathematics 2610—Linear Algebra
Mathematics 3010—Differential Equations

Program Year 3—Term 5
Engineering 3220—Engineering Measurements
Engineering 3630—Thermo Fluids III: Heat Transfer and Thermodynamic Cycles
Engineering 3710—Project-Based Professional Practice I
Engineering 3810—Systems Engineering
One (1) introductory engineering focus area elective*

Program Year 3—Term 6
Engineering 3430—Technology Management and Entrepreneurship
Engineering 3270—Machines & Automatic Controls
Engineering 3720—Project-Based Professional Practice II
Engineering 3820—System Dynamics with Simulation
One (1) engineering focus area elective*

Program Year 4—Term 7
Engineering 4210—Facilitated Study & Experimental Practice
Engineering 4710—Project-Based Professional Practice III
Engineering 4850—Computational Methods for Engineering Design
One (1) engineering focus area elective*

Program Year 4—Term 8
Engineering 4720—Project-Based Professional Practice IV
One (1) engineering focus area elective*
One (1) science or business elective
One (1) humanities elective (courses typically offered by the Faculty of Arts, except language acquisition or economics courses)

Students should consult with a faculty advisor before choosing electives.

*Four engineering focus area electives are required. The first of these (Program Year 3, Term 5) must be the introductory elective course in either mechatronics, sustainable energy, or bio-resources:
Engineering 3340—Introduction to Mechatronics Engineering
Engineering 3440—Introduction to Sustainable Energy Engineering
Engineering 3540—Introduction to Bioresources Engineering

The remaining three engineering focus area electives, in Terms 6, 7 and 8, can be selected from any of the following courses. At least one of the engineering focus area electives must be at the 4000 level.

Engineering 3370—Mechatronic System Integration and Interface Design
Engineering 3380—Real-time Embedded Systems
Engineering 3390—Introduction to Mechatronic Computer-Aided Product Development, Modelling and Simulation
Engineering 3450—Wind and Water Power
Engineering 3460—Solar Energy and Electricity Storage
Engineering 3490—Chemical Energy Conversion
Engineering 3570—Engineering Applications of Biological Materials
Engineering 3580—Soil Mechanics
Engineering 4310—Advanced Fabrication Techniques and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing
Engineering 4320—Control System Design
Engineering 4330—Innovations in Biomedical Engineering
Engineering 4350—Advanced Robotic Dynamics and Control
Engineering 4370—Fluid Power Control
Engineering 4410—Macro Energy Systems
Engineering 4440—Advanced Energy Storage
Engineering 4450—Fluid Loads on Energy Structures
Engineering 4470—Micro Grids
Engineering 4510—Geoinformatics in Bioresources
Engineering 4530—Fundamentals of Agricultural Machinery
Engineering 4550—Biotechnological Processes
Engineering 4830—Biomedical Signal Processing

ENGINEERING COURSES

1210 ENGINEERING COMMUNICATIONS
This course is the first in a series of design courses structured to foster development toward becoming a professional engineer.  It provides a basic introduction to the profession, to the design process, and to the way that engineers communicate through drawing, writing, speaking, and presenting. Students learn about the engineering design process by completing simple engineering design projects in a team-based environment. There is a strong focus on writing and computer-aided drawing.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to the Engineering Program. Engineering 1410 and Math 1910 must both be completed or taken concurrently
Three hours lecture and three hours design studio per week

1220 ENGINEERING ANALYSIS
This course is the second in a series of design courses structured to foster development toward becoming a professional engineer. It further introduces the engineering design process through team-based engineering design projects. Additionally, emphasis is placed on the development of a structured problem-solving and analysis ability that can be applied to most engineering applications.  Analysis topics include: basic concepts of electricity; estimation; statistics; graphing; and regression.  Computer-aided tools, such as Excel and MatLab are introduced.
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 1210 with a grade of at least 60%. Engineering 1310 must be completed or taken concurrently.
Three hours lecture and three hours of design studio per week

1230 ENGINEERING MECHANICS 1: STATICS
This course focuses on the equilibrium conditions for the state of rest of particles and rigid bodies subject to forces and moments. Topics to be discussed include vector operations, equilibrium conditions, free-body diagrams, moments and couples, distributed loadings, support reactions, truss analysis, centroids, moments of inertia, products of inertia, shear and bending moment diagrams, and friction.
PREREQUISITE:  Admission to the Engineering Program. Mathematics 1910 must be completed or taken concurrently.
Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week

1250 (formerly 2250) MATERIALS SCIENCE
This course focuses on the fundamental principles of chemistry as they relate to the properties and behaviour of materials in application to engineering systems. The relationship between electronic structure, chemical bonding, and atomic order is emphasized. The characterization of atomic arrangements in crystalline and amorphous solids, i.e. that of metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites are introduced. Knowledge of materials phenomena, including chemical equilibrium and kinetics, diffusion, electrochemistry, and phase transformations will be gained through experiential labs and lecture. Examples from industrial practice and emerging technologies will be used to illustrate the materials science concepts in this course.
PREREQUISITE: Mathematics 1920 must be completed or taken concurrently, Chemistry 1110
Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week

1310 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING WITH ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS
This introductory course in computer programming is specifically designed for engineering students with no previous programming experience. The learning objectives are twofold: 1) to gain the ability to write scripts and solve basic engineering problems using the Matlab® numerical computing environment, 2) to introduce embedded systems and the fundamentals of interfacing and real-time programming using the Arduino open-source platform. Topics include problem solving, algorithm design, modular programming, data types and number systems, operators, functions, decision statements, loops, and arrays.  The latter part of the course deals with the fundamentals of interfacing peripheral devices including sensors and actuators to design small embedded systems.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to the Engineering Program
Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week

1340 (formerly 2340) ENGINEERING MECHANICS II: DYNAMICS
This course is a study of mechanics concerned with the state of motion of rigid bodies that are subject to the action of forces. The course considers the kinematics and kinetics of motion applied particles and rigid bodies particularly as it relates to engineering applications and design. Topics include rectilinear and curvilinear motions, normal and tangential coordinates, dependent motion, Newton’s Laws of Motion, energy and momentum methods.
PREREQUISITE:  Mathematics 1920 must be completed or taken concurrently.  Engineering 1230
Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week

1410 SUSTAINABILITY IN ENGINEERING DESIGN
This course introduces the principles of sustainability in engineering design as they relate to the interactions among humans, living systems, the natural environment and the engineered world. Physical, chemical, biological, ecological, social, economic and life-cycle concepts, and their relevance to sustainable engineering design, are emphasized.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to the Engineering Program
Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week

2120 GEOLOGY FOR ENGINEERS
This course provides a basic overview of key geological processes and principles with emphasis on practical aspects of geology as they apply to engineering and related disciplines. Topics include rock types, rock formation, plate tectonics, glaciation, erosion, earth materials, geological mapping, stratigraphy and structural geology. An appreciation for ore forming processes, mineral resources, geothermal energy, environmental geology, and groundwater resources is also development. Laboratory activities focus on basic mineral and rock identification, and interpretation of topographic and geological maps.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to the Engineering Program or admission to the Environmental Studies Program
Three lecture hours per week

2130 STATISTICS FOR ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS
This course provides an introduction to statistics through its application to engineering in the areas of reliability and experimentation. Basic statistical concepts, such as probability, descriptive measures, population distributions, and hypothesis testing will be taught in the context of engineering reliability and experimentation scenarios. Students will be introduced to fundamental concepts of reliability, such as failure and repairability rates, and analysis techniques such as reliability block diagrams and fault tree analysis. Student will also learn the basics of experimental design, including one-factor-at-a-time and factorial testing, and get hands on experience with the design, execution, analysis and interpretation of experimental results.
PREREQUISITE:  Mathematics 1920
Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week

2210 ENGINEERING PROJECTS I
Combined with Engineering 2220, this course provides a complete community/industry design project experience. Emphasis is placed on strong technical design knowledge and team dynamics to facilitate learning and critical thinking.  Students are encouraged to develop and apply CAD, economics, sustainability, social justice, and ethics concepts in their own community/industry design projects.  Students are required to research and analyze the client’s situation (internal/external) and develop detailed analytical proposals and conceptual design options. Innovative project management tools and communication skills (team/client) are also introduced to achieve project deliverables in an effective manner.
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 1220 with a grade of at least 60%. Engineering 2310, Engineering 2610 and Engineering 2810 must be completed or taken concurrently and UPEI 1010
Three hours lecture and three hours design studio per week

2220 ENGINEERING PROJECTS II
Building on the work in Engineering 2210, students will complete detailed designs of their concepts, in-depth engineering analyses and develop a physical model or demonstration to support the recommended design solution.  Working closely with community/industry partners and faculty, students learn how to manage a complex client oriented project, supported by accurate numerical analysis and professional documentation. Emphasis is placed on hands-on activities in a team-oriented environment to achieve an optimal working prototype, keeping in view the concepts of practicality, adoptability, economics and sustainability.
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2210 with a grade of at least 60%
Three hours of lecture and three hours of design studio per week

2240 INTRODUCTION TO STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING
This course is an introduction to the field of structural analysis as an applied discipline. Building on deflection and truss analysis from previous mechanics courses, students are exposed to concepts of influence, flexibility, stiffness, impact and other analytical techniques and dynamic loading in rigid structures. The National Building Code and material resistance is also introduced.
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2310
Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week

2310 STRENGTH OF MATERIALS
This course is an introduction to the study of stress, strain and deformation of a solid body subjected to static forces. Topics include elastic and plastic stress, strain, Mohr’s circle, torsion, behaviour of beams and columns. Computer applications and hands-on laboratory experiments are used.
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 1230 and Mathematics 1920
Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week

2350 KINEMATICS AND DYNAMICS OF MACHINES
This course introduces fundamental concepts in the analysis of linkages and other aspects of complex machinery. Using graphical and analytical methods and relying on static and dynamic principles previously learned, students are exposed to a variety of cams, gears and trains in an applied context. Simple gyroscopic effects are also introduced.
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2340 and Math 1920
Three hours lecture and three hours of laboratory per week

2360 (formerly 3260) MATERIALS, MECHANICS, AND MANUFACTURING
This course advances the fundamental knowledge of materials science to focus on materials processing and industrial manufacturing techniques for metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites.  Knowledge of heat treatment and various metallurgical processes, as well as cold-working, subtractive and additive manufacturing, corrosion and fatigue, will be linked to an evaluation of materials properties, materials performance and mechanical behavior, and microstructure. Students will apply the materials life cycle and use various tools to assess quality and integrity to predefined specifications and tolerances. The materials phenomena and manufacturing techniques discussed in lecture will be demonstrated through experiential labs.
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2310
Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week

2430 ENGINEERING ECONOMICS
This course provides students with the fundamentals of engineering economics and finance financial aspects in the context of professional engineering practice. Topics include the time value of money, project screening, cost estimation, and discounting analysis techniques. Economic analysis of depreciation, maintenance, replacement and upgrading and the impact of taxes, inflation and time on infrastructure development. Relevant software and projects are used.
PREREQUISITE: Admission to the Engineering Program
Three hours lecture and three-hour tutorial per week

2520 FUNDAMENTALS OF PROCESS ENGINEERING
The main objective of this course is to develop the student’s ability to perform mass and energy balances on reactive and non-reactive processes. Introductory topics include systems of units and a study of process variables such as temperature, pressure, and flowrate. Also covered are fundamental properties of multiphase systems: phase equilibrium, vapour pressure, phase rule, Raoult’s and Henry’s Laws, and colligative properties. Emphasis is placed on developing problem-solving skills.
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2610
Three lecture hours and two tutorial hours per week

2610 THERMO FLUIDS I: THERMODYNAMICS
This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of the fundamental concepts and principles of thermodynamics (first and second laws) and the application of these principles to engineering problems. Topics included are: the nature and forms of energy; basic concepts of systems, properties, states and processes; energy transfer as work and heat; energy and The First Law of Thermodynamics; entropy and The Second Law of Thermodynamics; and heat engine cycles. The analysis of various systems for power generation or refrigeration is also included.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1110 must be completed or taken concurrently; Mathematics 1920
Three hours lecture and three lab hours per week

2620 THERMO FLUIDS II: FLUID MECHANICS
This course is an introduction to the field of fluid mechanics. Topics covered include properties of fluids, forces on submerged surfaces, stability of floating objects, ideal fluid flow, and momentum and energy methods. Concepts of similitude are introduced and fundamental scaling parameters in real fluids. Turbulence is introduced; pipe flow problems and lift/drag problems are solved.
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2610 and Math 2910
Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week

2810 ELECTRIC CIRCUITS
This course is a study of topics such as: voltage, current, resistance, power, Ohm’s laws, Kirchoff ‘s laws, sources, voltage and current division, nodal and mesh analysis, linearity and superposition, Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems, capacitance and inductance, RL and RC circuits. Concepts of electric charge, force and field are also introduced.
PREREQUISITE: Math 1920
Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week

2820 ELECTRIC CIRCUITS II
This course is a continuation of Engineering 2810, expanding upon concepts introduced in the first course. This will include two port networks, Fourier series and Fourier transforms, Laplace transforms, Bode and Polar plots, and Filters.
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2810
Three hours lecture and two hours tutorial per week

2830 DIGITAL LOGIC DESIGN
This course is a study of topics such as: digital and binary systems, Boolean algebra, combinational logic, sequential logic, minimization, registers and counters, clocks and synchronization, state machines, and programmable logic devices. Ladder logic and programmable logic controllers are also introduced.
PREREQUISITE:  Engineering 1310, Engineering 2810
Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week

3220 ENGINEERING MEASUREMENTS
This course covers the basic types of measurement of many fundamental physical phenomena, including time, distance, displacements, speed, rates, force, flow, temperature, pressure, stress and strain, and frequency. An introduction to digital and analog electronics is a component of the course, but the focus is on understanding ways to sense physical parameters. This course has a significant field component.
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2810 and Math 3010
Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week

3270 MACHINES AND AUTOMATIC CONTROL
This course introduces students to the complexity of automating machines. Building on previous machine design and electric circuit’s courses, students will investigate and experiment with all aspects of electrical systems, mechanical systems and automatic control. Topics covered include: history of machines, how machines work, concept of control, human interaction, instruments and measurements, control schematics, AC/DC machines and transformers, programmable technology, power electronics, electric motors, protection systems, and industrial safety. Labs involve reverse engineering exercises and industrial field trips are used to enhance understanding.
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2810 and Engineering 3220
Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week

3340 INTRODUCTION TO MECHATRONICS ENGINEERING
This course covers fundamental skills associated with the development of computer-controlled intelligent systems and processes. Following a modern approach to mechanical engineering design, students will attempt synergistic integration of electronics, control systems, and mechanical components in a controlled laboratory environment. Students must demonstrate skills related to the selection, integration and/or calibration of sensors, actuators, signal conditioning, control algorithms, computer software, and hardware systems used to manage complexity, uncertainty, and communication in robotic systems.
PREREQUISITES: Engineering 3710 must be completed or taken concurrently
Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week

3370 MECHATRONIC SYSTEM INTEGRATION AND INTERFACE DESIGN
This course focuses on the fundamentals of human and mechatronic system interaction and a systematic approach to its interface design. Signal generation, transmission, and interface design are the main topics of this course. Integration of the Mechatronics system focuses on the use of embedded electronics to control and monitor mechanical behavior in a mechatronic system. Following a user-centered design and observational philosophy, students will learn to evaluate the execution efficiency of typical voice, command and graphical (GUI) user interfaces to interact with the mechatronic system with the specific aim of monitoring and control. Topics include: transducers, motors and actuators I/O and signaling, signal transmission philosophy and design, conducting user studies, evaluation techniques, information structure, and programming for interactive systems. Labview and Simulink interface software development packages are used.
PREREQUISITES: Engineering 3340, 3440, or 3540
Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week

3380 REAL-TIME EMBEDDED SYSTEMS
This course will provide students with an overview of how different hardware components are inter-connected and how embedded systems are programmed. Students will learn how to determine the functions of given function units, and construct small scale logic circuits based on their functional specifications. Students will also learn to explain the stages involved in decoding and executing instructions, to illustrate basic concepts of interfacing to external devices, and to compare different set architectures. Students will study how to do programming for real-time embedded systems.
PREREQUISITES: Engineering 3340, 3440, or 3540
Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week

3390 MECHATRONICS COMPUTER-AIDED PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT, MODELLING, AND SIMULATION
This course reinforces students’ skills in solid modelling and expands into computational simulation. Utilizing advanced CAD/CAM/CAE simulation software such as SolidWorks, CATIA, Altair Hyperworks, ANSYS Workbench, and Stratsys Insight 3D printing software, and in a controlled environment, students engage in developing skills required to work in today’s industrial and integrated computer-aided product development. The course focuses on a hands-on approach to product innovation and the effective use of computational simulation technology. The course covers aspects of structural and mechanical CAE/FEA as well as thermal management CAE/CFD simulations when designing intelligent mechatronics products.
PREREQUISITES: Engineering 3340, 3440, or 3540
Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week

3430 (formerly 4230) TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT & ENTREPRENEURSHIP
This course provides an overview on how to start and sustain a technology-oriented company.  Topics discussed will include the role of technology in society, intellectual property, business feasibility studies, financial planning, sources of capital, business structure, marketing, operational and human resource management.  The focus will be on students as engineers-entrepreneurs with involvement from real life entrepreneurs as motivators and facilitators.  This course will use problem-based and experiential learning strategies to develop new ventures.  Students who produce a well-developed business idea from this course may be considered for approval to use this as the basis for their final year engineering design project.
Cross-listed with Computer Science 3840 and SDE-8230 (Graduate-level project will be defined).
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3710
Three lecture hours per week

3440 INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABLE ENERGY ENGINEERING
This introductory course considers current and promising future energy systems. Topics introduced include available resources, energy conversion technologies and end use applications and technologies. An emphasis is placed on understanding the needs of a future of global energy supply and its associated challenges. Students will develop a technical and analytical framework with which they can evaluate energy supply alternatives in the context of political, economic, environmental and social goals. Life cycle analysis is also considered. Topics introduced in this course may be covered in greater depth in other sustainable energy focus-area electives.
PREREQUISITES: Engineering 3710 must be completed or taken at least concurrently
Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week

3450 WIND AND WATER POWER
This course explores the engineering of wind- and water-based renewable energy conversion technologies such as wind turbines, tidal turbines, wave energy converters, and hydroelectric dams. Students will develop an understanding of the current state of technology and gain an appreciation for related issues of resource assessment, stakeholder engagement, and environmental impact. The underlying fluid mechanics principles will be emphasized to appreciate device operating principles and performance drivers. The challenge of satisfying energy demand with intermittent supply will be reviewed to further contextualize the different resource potentials, and related fluid-based storage technologies will be discussed.
PREREQUISITES: Engineering 3340, 3440, or 3540
Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week

3460 SOLAR ENERGY AND ELECTRICITY STORAGE
This course covers the fundamentals of solar power generation and associated energy storage systems. Course emphasis surrounds the electrical nature of solar photovoltaic energy generation associated energy/power conversion and storage systems. Students will develop a technical understanding of the underlying core technologies as well as how the technologies are productized. Topics covered may include: Solar photovoltaic (PV) generation, electric power converters for solar PV, battery storage technology, off-grid solar power conversion systems and small solar home systems. Lab projects may consist of studying various scales of PV power products and technologies.
PREREQUISITES: Engineering 3340, 3440, or 3540
Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week

3490 CHEMICAL ENERGY CONVERSION
This course covers fundamentals of thermodynamics, chemistry, flow and transport processes as applied to energy systems. Topics include analysis of energy conversion in thermochemical and thermomechanical processes as seen in existing power and transportation systems, and ways these processes may be improved in the future. Systems utilizing fossil fuels, biofuels, hydrogen, and other chemical energy sources, over a range of sizes and scales are discussed. Applications include fuel reforming, hydrogen and synthetic fuel production, combustion, thermal power cycles, fuel cells and catalysis. The course also deals with combustion emissions and environmental impacts, source utilization and fuel-life cycle analysis.
PREREQUISITES: Engineering 3340, 3440, or 3540
Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week

3540 INTRODUCTION TO BIORESOURCES ENGINEERING
Growing environmental problems created by unsustainable use of fossil resources is forcing us to move from a synthetic-based economy to a bio-based one. This introductory course will provide the fundamental skills in developing environmental technologies to enable students to pursue career opportunities in a range of industries. Looking into different resources available within the biosphere, students will learn to apply engineering knowledge for its sustainable use. Concepts of a bio-refinery will be introduced for developing fundamental understanding of integrated conversion processes (thermal, chemical and biological). Understanding the concepts of enzymatic and cellular kinetics, students will learn to design bioreactors. This course will also review the fundamental concepts of life-cycle analysis and explore the application of it to selected environmental projects.
PREREQUISITES: Engineering 3710 must be completed or taken at least concurrently
Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week

3570 ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS OF BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS
This course will focus on the understanding of the basic molecular structures of biological materials, such as wood, bioplastics, biocomposites and biofuels, and their engineering applications. It will develop the fundamental understanding of relationships between composition, structure and properties of various materials of biological origin. It will also address molecular design of new biological materials applying the molecular structural principles. The long-term goal of this course is to teach molecular design of new biological materials for a broad range of applications. A brief history of biological materials and its future perspective as well as its impact to the society will also be discussed.
PREREQUISITES: Engineering 3340, 3440, or 3540
Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week

3580 SOIL MECHANICS
This course explores the fundamentals of soil mechanics and their applications in engineering practice. Students will develop an understanding about the physical properties of soils, and will examine the behavior of soil masses subjected to various forces. The list of topics to be covered in this course include: soil composition and texture, physical properties of soils, classification of soils, permeability and seepage, consolidation, settlement, shear strength, vertical stresses in soils, soil exploration, bearing capacity and slope stability of soils.
PREREQUISITES: Engineering 3340, 3440, or 3540
Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week

3630 THERMOFLUIDS III: HEAT TRANSFER AND THERMODYNAMIC CYCLES
This course advances student knowledge across the related fields of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer with an emphasis on engineering applications. Heat transfer topics include: flows with friction and heat exchange, steady and unsteady heat conduction, convection and radiation phenomena; and heat exchanger analysis.  Thermodynamic cycles topics include: internal combustion as it applies to power generation; air standard and vapour cycles; gas turbines; jet engine; and steam power plants.
PREREQUISITE:  Engineering 2620
Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week

3710 PROJECT-BASED PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE I
Building on the work in previous design courses, this course is the first of a series of upper-year courses which simulates the practice of a professional engineer.  Following a design-build-test approach,  students work in a team-based environment to deliver design solutions to real-world industrial clients.  Following best practices in project management and sustainability, students develop detailed project proposals, conceptual designs, and proofs of concepts within the ethical and safety considerations that are fundamental to the profession.  Concepts are further developed into operational prototypes in Engineering 3720.
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2220 with a grade of at least 60%, Engineering 2360, Engineering 1340, Engineering 2620, and Engineering 2830
Six lecture hours and six hours design studio per week

3720 PROJECT-BASED PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE II
Continuing the work in Engineering 3710 and working closely with their external clients, students complete detailed designs of their concepts, build full-scale operational prototypes (where possible); carry out testing and validation of solutions in controlled laboratory and/or industrial environments (where possible), and present their final design solutions to their clients.
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3710 with a grade of at least 60%
Six lecture hours and six hours design studio per week

3810 SYSTEMS ENGINEERING
This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of systems engineering and a systems approach to analyzing complex problems. Specific subjects covered include: logistics, reliability, safety, performance, and risk management. Open-ended problems are used and students are expected to classify, categorize, and illustrate physical and functional relationships using schematic diagramming techniques. Modeling of performance is introduced, but is covered in greater depth in the systems dynamics course to follow. Systems considered in the course include human, ecological, transportation, communication, mechanical, electrical, and mechatronic. This course utilizes a problem-based experiential teaching method with a significant field component.
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 2220
Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week

3820 SYSTEM DYNAMICS WITH SIMULATION
This course introduces the analysis and control of dynamic systems, with concepts and examples drawn from all disciplines. It includes development and analysis of differential equation models for mechanical, electrical, thermal, and fluid systems, including some sensors. Systems are primarily analyzed using Laplace transforms and computer simulation methods. Analysis concepts cover first, second, and higher order differential equations, transient characteristics, transfer functions, stability, dominance, and frequency response. Properties of systems include time constant, natural and damped frequency, and damping ratio.
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3220 and Engineering 3810
Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week

4210 FACILITATED STUDY AND EXPERIMENTAL PRACTICE
This course provides an individual assessment of the students’ engineering knowledge to date in the context of their assigned industry-sponsored project. Students in consultation with faculty will determine knowledge and skill requirements of their project and develop a study and experimentation plan to fill gaps in the students’ knowledge and experience. The content of the course will be customized to each student and his or her individual needs.
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 4710 must be taken concurrently
Three lecture hours per week

4310 ADVANCED FABRICATION TECHNIQUES AND COMPUTER-INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING
This course concentrates on manufacturing knowledge with a focus on advanced fabrication techniques (AFT) and Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM). Students will expand their knowledge of traditional processes including CAD/CAM, forming, welding, milling, etc. leading into innovative advanced fabrication techniques in additive and precision manufacturing, next generation electronics, robotics and smart automation (CIM), and sustainable and green manufacturing modeling and simulation in the manufacturing process developed through lectures and labs. Integration of CIM into supply chain design and management is emphasized based on synergistic application of mechatronics approach and philosophy.
Cross-listed with SDE 8310
PREREQUISITES: Engineering 3340, 3440, or 3540; and Engineering 2360
Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week

4320 CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN
This course will provide students with an overview of system modelling and control methodologies of single/multiple input/output systems, e.g., energy transport control, reactor control, heat exchanger control, power production, and mechatronic systems. Students will learn classical control methods e.g., feedforward, feedbacks, cascade, decoupling to modern control methods, LQR, predictive control, optimal and robust control. Students will be equipped with knowledge and skills for analyzing stability, controllability and observability of state-space representation modelled systems.
Cross-listed with SDE 8320
PREREQUISITES: Engineering 3340, 3440, or 3540; and Engineering 3820
Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week

4330 INNOVATIONS IN BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING
This course introduces the study of medicine by focusing on innovations in medical devices, and future trends in materials, especially the increasing use of bio-resources, informatics, and mechatronics engineering applications in orthopedic, rehabilitation, simulation and education technologies. In its broader context, this course focuses on four areas of biotechnology, biomechanics, biomaterials and biosignals. Through a hands-on approach, the course focuses on innovative product development related to bio-signal, instrumentation, sensing, and image processing. Students will also gain an appreciation for the collaborative, interdisciplinary nature of engineering in medicine and its potential impact on society.
Cross-listed with SDE 8330 (Graduate-level project will be defined).
PREREQUISITES: Engineering 3710
Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week

4350 ADVANCED ROBOTIC DYNAMICS AND CONTROL
This course advances the fundamentals of robotics through exposure to in-depth knowledge and understanding of kinematics, dynamics, control and trajectory with applications to autonomous vehicles, automated manufacturing and processing and mobile robotics. Areas of interest include: position transformation and control, rigid body motion, kinematic control, compliance and force control.
Cross-listed with SDE 8350
PREREQUISITES: Engineering 3340, 3440, or 3540
Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week

4370 FLUID POWER CONTROL
This course covers the analysis and design of basic hydraulic and pneumatic circuits and systems. Topics include a review of the fundamentals of fluid mechanics including flow through valves, fittings, and pipe; classification of hydrostatic pumps and motors; control valves; hydraulic accumulators; sizing of practical hydraulic circuits; thermal and energy considerations; electrohydraulic control and modeling of hydraulic control systems. The latter part of the course focuses on pneumatic systems including pneumatic cylinders and motors, control valves, and compressor technology. The application of Programmable Logic Controls (PLCs) to industrial automation and the sequential control of pneumatic actuators is also addressed.
Cross-listed with SDE 8370
PREREQUISITES: Engineering 3340, 3440, or 3540; and Engineering 3820
Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week

4410 MACRO ENERGY SYSTEMS
This course covers methods for analyzing energy supply, conversion processes, and end-use at the system level. Aspects considered include the dynamics of energy supply and demand, efficiencies of energy conversion, characteristics of energy currencies, and energy needs across different sectors. Students will characterize methods of delivering energy services such as heat, light, industrial power and transportation. Energy analysis will be introduced and used to build a quantitative framework for integrating techno-economic analysis of energy system components, with emphasis on elements such as fossil fuels and nuclear power. Students will gain an enhanced, quantitative appreciation for the sustainability, emissions, cost and energy intensity aspects of energy services delivery.
Cross-listed with SDE 8410
PREREQUISITES: Engineering 3340, 3440, or 3540

4440 ADVANCED ENERGY STORAGE
This course considers advanced technical analysis of energy storage systems. A comprehensive overview of all industrially relevant energy storage systems is reviewed and emphasis is placed on promising energy storage technologies of the future. Chemical, thermal and kinetic storage technologies will be discussed in detail.
Cross-listed with SDE 8440
PREREQUISITES: Engineering 3340, 3440, or 3540
Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week

4450 FLUID LOADS ON ENERGY STRUCTURES
This course is an introduction to the loads applied on structures from wind, waves, and currents, and their heightened relevance to structures designed for energy conversion. Phenomena to be discussed include lift and drag, boundary layers, vortex-induced vibrations, wakes, hydrostatic loading, and water waves. A selection of engineering methods will be introduced and brought to bear on these topics, such as potential flow theory, blade-element theory, Airy wave theory and Morison’s equation. Dimensional analysis will be introduced to characterize flow problems. Design implications will be discussed for a selection of relevant energy conversion structures such as aircraft wings, wind turbines, breakwaters, marine vessels, and offshore energy platforms.
Cross-listed with SDE 8450
PREREQUISITES: Engineering 3340, 3440, or 3540
Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week

4470 MICRO GRIDS
This course focuses on the concept, operation and optimization of renewable-energy-based micro-grids. Concepts introduced and considered include renewable energy resources, integration technologies, grid-connected operation, islanded grid operation, energy storage integration and the optimal dimensioning and mixing of multiple energy sources where some are stochastic in nature and some are dispatchable. Existing and future energy storage technologies will be also be discussed. This course is based on energy flow analysis and makes extensive use of software simulation tools. Students will develop a framework for performing techno-economic assessments of micro-grid architectures and designs. A strong background in electrical power systems is not necessarily required.
Cross-listed with SDE 8470
PREREQUISITES: Engineering 3340, 3440, or 3540
Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week

4510 GEOINFORMATICS IN BIORESOURCES
This course covers the theory and practice of geoinformatics and their applications to problems in bioresources using digital mapping and spatial analysis. Hands on laboratories will provide students with an experience to collect georeferenced data using differential global positioning system, followed by mapping and analysis in geographical information system. Topics include datums, map projections and transformations, vector and raster data, geo-spatial analysis, geo-statistics and interpolation techniques. This course will also cover the fundamentals of remote sensing, data collection with sensors, and spatial and temporal aspects of the bio-resources attributes.
Cross-listed with SDE 8510
PREREQUISITES: Engineering 3340, 3440, or 3540
Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week

4530 FUNDAMENTALS OF AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY
This course highlights the fundamentals of mechanized agriculture machinery from soil preparation, planting, and crop management to mechanical harvesting. The machines and their unit operation are analyzed with respect functions, work rates, material flow and power usage. The machine performance relating to work quality and environmental effects will also be evaluated. The labs will emphasize on safety, basic maintenance, adjustment, calibrations of equipment and performance testing. This course also covers the variable rate applicators for site-specific application of inputs, auto guidance system, data acquisition and management for intelligent decision making for machines, and precision agriculture technologies.
Cross-listed with SDE 8530
PREREQUISITES: Engineering 3340, 3440, or 3540
Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week

4550 BIOTECHNOLOGICAL PROCESSES
The basic topics covered in this course may include fermentation, engineering of reactor, natural products purification and their applications in biotechnology sector. The students will learn basic concepts of chemical and biochemical techniques required for the development and purification of materials in biotechnological, biochemical and pharmaceutical industries. The design of fermenters and biological reactors and their modification to improve the industrial applications will be discussed. The design of reactors in context of mass and energy balances will be evaluated and downstream unit processes involved in product  recovery will be presented.
Cross-listed with SDE 8550
PREREQUISITES: Engineering 3340, 3440, or 3540
Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week

4710 PROJECT-BASED PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE III
This course engages students in implementing the engineering design process and using product management and development tools. Student design teams work closely with industry partners to develop innovative and sustainable solutions to meet global challenges. Additionally, this course emphasizes the role of analysis, simulation and modeling in engineering design. Students further develop their professional and technical skills through activity-, project- and problem-based learning. Through the application of appropriate frameworks to their projects, students gain an appreciation for best practices and ethical behavior as well as an awareness of the role of engineers in society, in particular the concepts of engineering leadership and sustainable design.
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3720 with a grade of at least 60%, Engineering 3270, Engineering 3630, Engineering 3820 and Engineering 3230.  Engineering 4210 must be taken concurrently.
Six lecture hours and six design studio hours per week

4720 PROJECT-BASED PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE IV
This course engages students in implementing the engineering design process and using product management and development tools. Student design teams work closely with industry partners to develop innovative and sustainable solutions to meet global challenges. Additionally, this course emphasizes the role of prototyping and manufacturing, testing and verification, design of experiments, optimization and feasibility.  Students further develop their professional and technical skills through activity-, project- and problem-based learning. Through the application of appropriate frameworks to their projects, students gain an appreciation for best practices and ethical behavior as well as an awareness of the role of engineers in society, in particular the concepts of engineering leadership and sustainable design.
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 4710 with a grade of at least 60%
Six hours of lecture and six hours of design studio per week

4810-4820 DIRECTED STUDIES IN ENGINEERING
Available to advanced engineering students at the discretion of the department. Entry to the course, course content, and the conditions under which the course may be offered will be subject to the approval of the Chair of the Department and the Dean of the Faculty. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)

4830 BIOMEDICAL SIGNAL PROCESSING
This course is an introduction to the basics of viewing, processing, and analyzing of biosignals, or signals originating from living beings. Biosignals may be characterized as bioelectrical signals which can be composed of both electrical and non-electrical parts. Topics include both linear and nonlinear systems, signal conditioning or filtering, improving signal quality (signal-to-noise ratio) through averaging techniques, and signal representations in both the time and frequency domains.
Cross-listed with SDE 8830
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 3220
Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week.

4850 COMPUTATIONAL METHODS FOR ENGINEERING DESIGN
This course covers the numerical methods that form the basis of many engineering techniques and applies these methods to quantitative engineering design. The fundamentals of numerical approaches are reviewed, including iteration, approximation, and numerical errors. Methods are presented for numerical integration, differentiation, and nonlinear equation solving. Numerical approaches to solving differential equations are examined and their applications to numerical modelling, including finite-element analysis and computation fluid dynamics, are explored. Computational approaches to frequency-domain analysis using discrete Fourier transforms are introduced, along with related topics such as digital filtering and numerical convolution. Algorithms are presented for array and matrix computation, solving systems of equations, regression, curve fitting, and numerical optimization. Finally, these computational techniques are brought to bear on the topic of design optimization, emphasizing the transformation of real-world engineering design problems into quantitative formulations to which computational design optimization techniques can be applied.
PREREQUISITE: Engineering 1310 and Math-3010
Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week.

4910-4920 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGINEERING
This course provides students with an opportunity to pursue special topics in engineering. The course content and its offering in any one semester will be at the discretion of the Department. Interested students should contact the Department to confirm the details of the course and its offering.

English

http://upei.ca/english

English Language and Literature Faculty
Elizabeth Epperly, Professor Emeritus
Brent MacLaine, Professor Emeritus
Terry Pratt, Professor Emeritus
Greg Doran, Associate Professor, Chair
Richard M. Lemm, Professor
Shannon Murray, Professor
Anne Furlong, Associate Professor
John McIntyre, Associate Professor
Wendy Shilton, Associate Professor
Esther Wohlgemut, Associate Professor

PREAMBLE

The English Majors and Honours program encourages students to explore the diverse body of literature in English from a variety of perspectives. Course content and critical approaches range across the discipline and include historical, theoretical, interdisciplinary and genre studies. The program also offers courses in creative writing and linguistics. Students may expect to gain both a sound background in the history of the English language and literature, and a familiarity with the most recent developments in literary practice and scholarship. The curriculum is designed to encourage a progressive acquisition of literary skills. As students earn their degree through their four years, they will progress from introduction to, through development in, toward mastery of, the following: (a) elements of the English language; (b) the research essay; (c) critical reading and literary theory; (d) the terminology of the discipline; (e) knowledge of the periods of literary history; (f ) verbal presentations. In order for students to understand the goal of sequencing of courses and skills acquisition, the Department offers the following general descriptions for courses at four levels:

(i) 1000-Level Courses: Introduction (ii) 2000-level courses: Foundation (iii) 3000-level courses: Coverage (iv) 4000-level courses: Focus

COURSE LEVELS AND PREREQUISITES

(i) Courses at the 1000 level are introductory courses that provide a basic framework for critical reading and writing at university. English 1920 and 1950 are general introductions to literature, taught from a variety of perspectives. English 1210 and 1220 are required courses for a major, minor, or honours in English. Detailed descriptions of each year’s courses will be available in the Department’s Calendar Supplement.

(ii) Courses at the 2000 level are either general interest courses or foundational courses that develop the skills necessary for further study in English. The prerequisite for 2000-level courses is at least one 1000-level English course or permission of the instructor.

(iii) Courses at the 3000 level provide detailed study of areas of language and literature. The prerequisites for these courses are (a) at least one 1000-level English course, and (b) at least one 2000-level English course, or permission of the instructor. Some courses require specific 2000-levelcourses.

Courses at the 4000 level are designed to give students the opportunity for advanced study of a chosen topic within a specific area of English language or literature. The classes are usually seminars that require active participation and independent study. Students must have completed English 2960: Writing About Literature and at least two 3000-level courses before enrolling in a 4000-level course.

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONOURS IN ENGLISH

ADMISSION

The permission of the English Department is required before a student enrols in Honours English. The admission requirement is an overall average of at least 75% in all prior English courses. Admission to the program will be competitive, and because the demand for the program will likely exceed the resources available at the Department, not all applicants who meet the formal admission requirements will be accepted into the Honours program.

It is strongly recommended that students take English/UPEI 1010 in their first year.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

An Honours English student must complete 120 credits, including the following minimal requirements in English:

English 1210, 1220, 2040 and 2960 12 credits
Four Pre-1900 English courses*
* One of the courses must be a Shakespeare course
12 credits
English Language and Linguistics 3 credits
Literary Theory 3 credits
Two 4000 Level English Course 6 credits
Eight English Electives 24 credits
English 4960 3 credits
English 4970 3 credits
Total 66 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN ENGLISH

The completion of English/UPEI 1010 in the first year of study is strongly recommended. This course also meets the UPEI requirement of taking UPEI-1010, 1020 or 1030.

51 Credits are required for a Major in English:

Required Courses:

English 1210, 1220, 2040 and 2960 12 credits
Four Pre-1900 English courses* 12 credits
English Language and Linguistics or Literary Theory 3 credits
Two 4000 Level English Courses 6 credits
Six English Electives 18 credits
Total 51 credits

 * One of the courses must be a Shakespeare course.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN ENGLISH

Students in the English Minors program complete English 1210 and 1220, and at least five other English courses above the 1000 level as electives, two of which must be at the 3000 or 4000 level. Students are encouraged to choose those electives in consultation with the Department Chair or Minors Co-ordinator.

ADVANCED STUDIES

Advanced Studies courses are designed to give students the opportunity for in-depth study of a chosen topic within a specific area of English language or literature. The classes are usually seminars that require active participation and independent study. They may be devoted to a major author, a group of authors, thematic or stylistic developments, or critical or theoretical concerns. Detailed descriptions of each year’s Advanced Studies courses are published in the Department’s Calendar Supplement.

ENGLISH COURSES

1010 ACADEMIC WRITING (Offered every semester)
This course offers an introduction to university writing and rhetoric, aimed at the development of clear, critical thinking and an effective prose style.
Cross-listed with UPEI 1010.
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) program for those students enrolled in the EAP program.
Three hours a week

1210 HEROES, LOVERS, GODS, AND MONSTERS: SURVEY OF LITERATURE FROM ITS BEGINNINGS TO 1789
This course uses the idea of the hero to explore the literature of England from its beginning to 1789. The course will introduce such texts as Beowulf (the Anglo-Saxon epic hero), Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (the romance hero), The Faerie Queene (the allegorical hero), Paradise Lost (the biblical epic hero) and Gulliver’s Travels (the satiric hero). Along the way, students will meet other characters, including lovers, gods, and monsters, who challenge and support the hero. This is a course in reading, appreciation, and critical analysis within an historical framework.
Three hours a week

1220 VISIONARIES, REBELS, EXILES, AND REFORMERS: SURVEY OF LITERATURE FROM 1785 TO THE PRESENT
This course introduces students to British literature from the onset of the Industrial Revolution in the 1780s to the multicultural, high-tech, globalized twenty-first century. The course investigates how Romantic, Victorian, Modern, and Contemporary writers responded to the profound social, psychological, economic, and political upheavals of their times in poems, short stories, novels, plays, and manifestos, which themselves revolutionized human experience. This is a course in reading, appreciation, and critical analysis within an historical framework.
Three hours a week

1920 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE (Offered every semester)
This course introduces the major literary genres and focuses upon a selection of representative works. Students explore and discuss the elements of poetry, fiction, and drama. Class work involves lectures and discussions, with a special emphasis on writing assignments.
Three hours a week

1950 INTRODUCTION TO DRAMA
This course introduces the genre of drama, focusing on six specific periods. Students will explore the theatrical, historical and literary aspects of dramatic works from the Classical, Medieval, Renaissance, Neo-Classical, Modern, and Contemporary periods. In addition, this course will also introduce the genre of film. Class work involves lectures and discussions, with a special emphasis on writing assignments.
Three hours a week

2040 RESEARCH METHODS IN ENGLISH
This course deals with practical and theoretical issues in finding and using standard bibliographic and electronic sources for scholarly research in English literature and language and related disciplines. This course is compulsory for English Honours and Majors students, and strongly recommended for English Minors.
Three hours a week

2060 CRITICAL APPROACHES TO TEXTS I
This course approaches literary and cultural texts through a number of critical lenses including reader response, Marxism, feminism, historicism, psychoanalysis, and deconstruction. The course is designed to introduce students to a variety of critical approaches to the interpretation of literary and cultural texts.
Three hours a week

2110 CONTINENTAL LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION
This course introduces students to poems, plays, novels, and short stories taken from a variety of eras from the ancient to the contemporary in continental European literature. Authors whose translated works may be read include such figures as Homer, Sophocles, Virgil, Dante, Cervantes, Montaigne, Goethe, Dostoevsky, Baudelaire, Ibsen, Kafka, and Brecht.
Three hours a week

2120 CREATIVE WRITING I
This workshop in creative writing provides students with the opportunity to develop their proficiency in writing fiction, poetry, drama, or creative non-fiction. Students produce and revise new material and present these manuscripts to the work- shop. Class time is devoted to discussion of students’ manuscripts and published texts and to strategies and structures involved in writing them.
PREREQUISITE: Submission of a portfolio (e.g., 5-10 pages of poetry, 10-20 pages of fiction or scriptwriting, or 10-20 pages of creative non-fiction); and permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

2130 LITERATURE AND THE BIBLE
This course explores the influence of the Bible on English Literature from the Old English period to the present, through the study of texts such as The Dream of the Rood, the Medieval cycle plays, Paradise Lost, Absalom and Achitophel, Pilgrim’s Progress, Frankenstein, and Not Wanted On the Voyage.
Three hours a week

2210 WRITING BY WOMEN
Students explore a wide range of writing by women—poems, plays, novels, short stories, essays—in the context of historical and social concerns. The course normally concentrates on British, American, and Canadian women writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, but in some semesters may concentrate on women writers from other centuries and cultures.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 2210.
Three hours a week

2220 READING FILM: INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES
This course introduces students to the basic elements used in the construction of films, such as narrative structure, editing, and mise en scène. Through the exploration of techniques specific to film, as well as other more general narrative strategies, students develop visual literacy skills. They learn how to understand and write about the medium of film and the particular films studied. The films screened cover a variety of styles and come from a variety of periods.
Three lecture hours a week and one screening every two weeks

2240 SCIENCE FICTION
This course introduces students to the genre of science fiction. Looking at literature from a variety of historical periods, students explore how science fiction responds to the cultural contexts out of which it arises. Possible topics include space/time travel, alternative histories, artificial intelligence, the relationship between technology and morality, and utopias and dystopias.

2260 CRIME AND DETECTIVE LITERATURE
This course examines themes of crime, criminality, and detection in English literature. Focussed on a range of works drawn from selected literary periods and genres, the course considers the roles and representations of the criminal, the detective, the suspect, the witness, the victim, and the terrorist, as well as the perception of crime and criminality more generally. Topics may include popular notions of law and order, the city as crime scene, evidence and interpretation, and social justice.
PREREQUISITE: One 1000-level English course or permission of instructor
Three hours per week in a combination with lecture/discussion

2340 PUBLIC SPEAKING WORKSHOP
English 2340 is an intensive practical course in public speaking that helps students from across the disciplines become confident oral communicators. By learning and applying the techniques that the very best speakers use, students will gain the knowledge and experience they need to overcome performance obstacles and ultimately to find their own voices. The overall aim of the course is to move participants towards an extemporaneous speaking style that they can carry with them through their studies and into their professional lives.
Three hours a week

2440 INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE STUDY – TEXT, CHARACTER, AND PERFORMANCE
(See Theatre Studies 2440)

2450 INTRODUCTION TO CHILDREN’S LITERATURE
This course traces the development of literature for children, including the folktale tradition, a survey of children’s literature before 1850, and some examples of children’s literature after Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.
Three hours a week

2550 INTRODUCTION TO SHAKESPEARE
This course introduces students to the study of Shakespeare’s plays through a focus on his comedies and tragedies. This course is a good choice for students who intend to teach high school English.
Three hours a week

2560 SHAKESPEARE IN FILM AND MEDIA
This course explores a selection of Shakespeare’s plays through their performance in film, television, and multimedia adaptations. The course includes a film lab.
Three hours a week

2720 CONTEMPORARY POETRY
This course is a study of poetic directions since 1960, exploring the work of British, Irish, and North American poets such as Larkin, Lowell, Hughes, Heaney, Atwood, Ginsberg, Plath, Hecht, and Rich.
Three hours a week

2750 ARTHURIAN LITERATURE THROUGH THE AGES
This course introduces students to the Arthurian legend as it is re-told through the ages. The course will begin with the origins of the Arthurian myth in Welsh legend, and trace it from the golden age of Medieval romance through to the twentieth century.
Three hours a week

2810 THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
This course introduces students to the nature of language by exploring the factors that shape Present-Day English. Students will cover the basic principles of linguistics, and a brief history of the language. Topics may include languages as structured systems; dialects of English (with an emphasis on Atlantic English); gender and language; the acquisition of language; and human and animal communication. Classes combine lecture, group work, discussion, and practical exercises.
Three hours a week

2850 LINGUISTICS I: THE SOUND SYSTEM OF ENGLISH
This course introduces students to the phonetics and phonology of contemporary English for the purpose of studying the sound patterns of English, and acquaints them with the analysis of syllable structure, rhythm and intonation, and stress. Classes combine lecture, group work, discussion, practical exercises, transcription, and problem solving.
Three hours a week

2860 LINGUISTICS II: THE GRAMMAR AND VOCABULARY OF ENGLISH
This course introduces students to the syntax and morphology of contemporary English. The course will investigate the principles of word formation (morphology), and of the formation of phrases and sentences (syntax). Class activities include lectures, group work, discussion, practical exercises, sentence analysis and problem solving.
Three hours a week

2910 SPECIAL TOPICS IN LITERATURE
This variable content course is designed to accommodate recent developments and trends in literature. It is a general course suited to non-English majors, with a focus on particular themes, writers, or critical approaches. Course descriptions are published in the English Department’s Calendar Supplement.
Three hours a week

2960 WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE
This course is designed for English students who are seriously interested in developing the analytical writing skills necessary for producing clear, well-organized, and persuasive arguments about literature. It will provide students with opportunities to read, discuss, and write about fiction, poetry, and plays while becoming more familiar with literary analysis, critical frameworks, and literary discourse (i.e., the rhetoric and terms specific to the discipline of literary studies). Assignments will be based on the multi-step writing process of preliminary writing, drafting, revising and peer review, and editing, with attention to effectiveness at the level of thinking, content, structure, and use of evidence. By the end of the course, students should experience greater confidence and proficiency in their ability to enter the critical conversation about literature.
PREREQUISITE: English 1210 or 1220 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3030 LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY DRAMA
This course introduces students to a variety of significant late Twentieth Century dramatists. The course examines the plays in relationship to preceding dramatic periods and the variety of influences on them. The course examines a variety of styles, such as Absurdism, and a variety of themes. The course explores the work of a variety of dramatists, such as Beckett, Albee, Ionesco, Walcott and Stoppard.
Three hours a week

3040 CONTEMPORARY FICTION
This course studies trends and techniques in fiction in English since the Second World War. It includes representative novels and short stories by major writers of various nationalities.
Three hours a week

3050 LITERATURE OF NEWER NATIONS AND ANCIENT CULTURES
This course explores English-language literature from nations that came into existence during and soon after the era of European colonialism, for example: Australia, New Zealand, Nigeria, Kenya, South Africa, India, Pakistan, and Caribbean nations. Selected texts may reflect long-standing civilizations and ancient cultures, for instance, of Africa and South Asia. As well, indigenous cultures may be represented in works examined. Through literary works, students encounter the rich legacies and distinctive realities of these seemingly “foreign” societies, as well as the profound similarities and interconnections of these cultures with our own.
PREREQUISITE: (a) at least one 1000-level English course, and (b) at least one 2000-level English course, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3060 CRITICAL APPROACHES TO TEXTS II
This course examines critical trends of the twentieth century and provides practice in the application of critical methodology to literary and cultural texts. The course is designed to build on the knowledge of critical approaches acquired in English 206: Critical Approaches to Texts I.
Three hours a week

3130 PHILOSOPHY AND LITERATURE
(See Philosophy 3610)

3140 IDENTITY AND POPULAR CULTURE
(See Diversity and Social Justice Studies 3110)

3150 STAGING CANADA: CANADIAN DRAMA
This course introduces students to a variety of significant Canadian dramatists from 1967 to the present. In addition to examining the historical and literary contexts of the plays, the course considers the external forces affecting dramatic production throughout the period. The dramatists studied may include George Ryga, David French, Wendy Lill, Sharon Pollock, Judith Thompson, and Tomson Highway.
Three hours a week

3210 TRUE NORTH: CANADIAN FICTION
This course introduces students to a variety of significant English-Canadian fiction writers. Students encounter prominent issues and characteristics in Canadian fiction, for example: regional, urban, and rural manifestations;traditional ethnic heritage and newer multi-cultural legacies; indigenous history and culture; gender and sexual identity and relationships; family and community dynamics; socio-economic aspirations and conflicts; war-time experiences; relationships with the Canadian landscape and seascape; work and technology; the ongoing re-creation of a mythic and historical past to define the present and shape the future. Texts will be drawn from various fictional genres, and may include works of creative non-fiction.
Three hours a week

3220 CANADIAN POETRY
This course approaches Canadian poetry as a vibrant contemporary art form with rich historical roots. By exploring a diverse range of approaches to the writing of poetry in Canada, students will develop an appreciation for the broader historical, aesthetic, political, and social developments that continue to shape this vital form of expression. The focus throughout will be on active forms of interpretation-creative, analytical, and experimental-that not only illuminate the inner workings of individual poems, but also situate their meaning in the world around us.
Three hours a week

3230 LITTÉRATURE CANADIENNE-FRANÇAISE I: DE LA NOUVELLE FRANCE A 1895
(See French 4410)

3240 LITTÉRATURE CANADIENNE-FRANÇAISE II: XXe SIECLE
(See French 4420)

3310 THE LITERATURE OF ATLANTIC CANADA
This course studies works by the major writers of Atlantic Canada. It includes a consideration of the socioeconomic and geographic factors that have influenced them and an exploration of the character of the region as depicted in their works.
Three hours a week

3320 MODERN BRITISH LITERATURE
By considering the works of authors such as Conrad, Lawrence, Woolf, Yeats, and Joyce, this course examines the literature of Britain, including Anglo-Irish writing, from the close of the Victorian age to the mid-twentieth century.
PREREQUISITE: English 1220
Three hours a week

3330 L.M. MONTGOMERY
This course investigates L.M. Montgomery’s contributions as a writer of women’s and children’s fiction; as a diarist and poet; and as a regional and international writer. Readings include some of Montgomery’s most popular works from the Anne and Emily series as well as her lesser-known works.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 3330.
Three hours a week

3350 BRITISH ROMANTIC LITERATURE
This course traces the origins and development of the British Romantic movement from the dawn of the French Revolution to the aftermath of the Napoleonic wars. Emphasis is placed on understanding the social, cultural, and historical contexts in which the writers worked. Major emphasis will be on the works of such writers as Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Byron, Percy Shelley, and Mary Shelley.
PREREQUISITE: English 122
Three hours a week

3360 VICTORIAN LITERATURE
This course introduces students to the Victorian period through an examination of the ideas and concerns which characterized the period. Emphasis is placed on understanding the social, cultural, and historical contexts in which the writers worked. Writers covered include Arnold, Carlyle, Tennyson, Ruskin, D. Rossetti, C. Rossetti, E. Barrett Browning, R. Browning, and Wilde.
PREREQUISITE: English 1220
Three hours a week

3370 NINETEENTH-CENTURY BRITISH FICTION
This course examines the development of the novel in Britain from the early to the late nineteenth century, focussing on novels by writers such as Austen, Dickens, the Brontës, Thackeray, Eliot, and Hardy. Emphasis is placed on social context, nineteenth-century responses, and contemporary criticism of the novels studied.
PREREQUISITE: English 1220
Three hours a week

3410 EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY DRAMA
This course introduces students to a variety of significant dramatists from the late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries. The course examines the plays in relationship to the preceding period and its influence on them. The course examines the stylistic movements associated with the period, such as Realism. The course explores the work of a variety of dramatists, such as Ibsen, Chekhov, Shaw, Brecht, Synge, and Wilde.
Three hours a week

3450 BANNED AND CHALLENGED CHILDREN’S BOOKS
This course examines the intersection of English children’s literature and censorship. Through a variety of children’s and young adult texts, students will trace the history of censorship in children’s book publishing; examine how definitions of childhood and children’s literature have evolved over time and across cultures; and discover how parents, publishers, schools, and libraries handle challenges in practice. The course traces assumptions – both historical and personal — about what reading is appropriate for children and young adults.
PREREQUISITE: English 2450 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3420 FICTION FROM IRELAND
This course surveys Irish fiction in English from the nineteenth century to the present, including the Irish Literary Revival. Students examine works by such writers as Edgeworth, Carleton, Joyce, O’Flaherty, Flann O’Brien, Stephens, Bowen, and Doyle in the context of the political, social, and cultural developments of their time.
Three hours a week

3510 OUTLIERS AND EXPATRIATES: AMERICAN LITERATURE IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY
This course studies the prevailing currents in American Literature over the course of the Twentieth Century. Students examine a range of literary developments such as modernism, the Harlem Renaissance, the Beat Generation, and postmodernism. Through these movements, American writers responded to an era defined by profound upheaval and cultural transformation, including global economic depression, two world wars, the rise of the nuclear age, and the ensuing counter-cultural revolution. Writers to be studied may include F. Scott Fitzgerld, William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, J.D. Salinger, Don DeLillo, and Toni Morrison.
PREREQUISITE: At least one 1000-level English course and at least one 2000-level English course, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3560 RENAISSANCE LITERATURE
This course offers a survey of the poetry and prose of the time of Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, and James I. Students read the sonnets of William Shakespeare and works by such writers as Thomas More, John Donne, Philip Sidney, and Ben Jonson.
PREREQUISITE: English 1210 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3570 RENAISSANCE DRAMA
This course is a study of representative works of English Renaissance drama (excluding Shakespeare). Writers include Kyd, Marlowe, Dekker, Jonson, Middleton, and Webster.
PREREQUISITE: English 1210 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3580 MILTON
This course offers a thorough reading of Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained, as well as a representative sample of John Milton’s early poetry and prose.
PREREQUISITE: English 1210 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3620 NINETEENTH-CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE 1830-1910
This course focuses on important writers and texts who influenced the social and cultural context of nineteenth-century America from the “renaissance” through the realist period to the beginning of early Modernism. Emphasis is placed on poetry, prose, and prose fiction and to such themes as freedom, individualism, idealism, materialism, and the environmental imagination. Among the writers studied are Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Poe, Fuller, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, and James.
Three hours a week

3640 TREMORS AND AFTERSHOCKS: AMERICAN LITERATURE IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY
Focused on American Literature since the beginning of the twenty-first century, this course studies a range of novels, poems, and plays within the context of a rapidly changing cultural and political context. The course examines how literary and cultural texts respond to and inform debates around topics such as nationalism, regionalism, and immigration as these developments redefine America within a new century.
PREREQUISITE: At least one 1000-level English course and at least one 2000-level English course, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3650 EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE I
This course explores a variety of different kinds of texts–poems, novels, pamphlets, essays, diaries–written between 1660 and the middle of the eighteenth century. The course allows students to consider a number of cultural themes and issues, for example, gender, race, travel, crime, and science. Writers may include Rochester, Behn, Dryden, Pepys, Hay wood, Swift, Pope, Montagu, Leapor.
PREREQUISITE: English 1210 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3660 EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE II
This course explores a variety of different kinds of texts–poems, novels, pamphlets, essays, diaries–written between the middle and the end of the eighteenth century. The primary focus of this course is on the literature of sensibility and the development of the gothic. This course considers writers such as Richardson, Fielding, Montagu, Johnson, Walpole, Burney, and Radcliffe, placing their texts within a larger cultural context, and exploring their connection, for example, to medical discourses, architecture, and prison reform.
PREREQUISITE: English 1210 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3670 RESTORATION AND EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY DRAMA
This course explores British drama from the reopening of the theatres in 1660 through the eighteenth century. Students study a representative selection of plays, with particular attention to the ways they are embedded in contemporary culture. Students also read contemporary culture through the drama and the drama within a larger cultural context. Playwrights considered may include Wycherley, Behn, Congreve, Pix, Centlivre, Gay, and Sheridan.
Three hours a week

3720 CHAUCER
This course provides an introduction to the works of Geoffrey Chaucer in his context as a fourteenth-century English poet. The course explores a selection of Chaucer’s writings, such as The Book of the Duchess, The Parliament of Fowls, The Legend of Good Women, and The Canterbury Tales.
PREREQUISITE: English 1210 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3750 ROMANCING THE MIDDLE AGES
This course studies the themes, conventions and genres of medieval romance. It begins with romance itself, following the ideals of the hero, the heroine and the quest. It then moves to the interaction of romance and other genres, such as devotional literature and saints’ lives.
PREREQUISITE: English 1210 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3780 THE MEDIEVAL BOOK
This course focuses on the physical artefact of the Medieval manuscript book – in particular, how manuscripts were made, designed and used. Students are introduced to a variety of medieval manuscripts in facsimile form to study the different designs that were used for books intended for different genres and uses.
Cross-listed with History 3780.

3790 UNDERSTANDING COMICS: READING GRAPHIC NOVELS
This course introduces students to the elements of the graphic novel. Through the exploration of techniques specific to the graphic novel, as well as other general narrative and literary strategies, students will learn to read, interpret and write about graphic novels. Additionally, students will learn about the development of this literary genre.
PREREQUISITE: One 2000-level English course or permission of the instructor
Three hours per week in a combination with lecture/discussion

3810 PROFESSIONAL WRITING
This course introduces students from a variety of disciplines to the skills and tasks required for effective communication in a professional environment. The course focuses on the following: analytical reports, proposals, descriptions of processes, extended definitions, instructions, business correspondence, memoranda, graphics, presentation of data, and oral presentations. Assignments, designed for the student’s particular discipline, emphasize a sound analysis of the goals for each task, and the effective, economical, clear, and correct use of language to achieve these goals.
PREREQUISITE: English 1010 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3850 LINGUISTICS AND LITERATURE
In this course students apply the principles and practice of linguistics to the analysis and interpretation of literary texts. Particular emphasis is placed on metrical theory and its application to an understanding of verse forms. Topics may include a linguistic account of metaphor and aesthetic effects; the communicative function of literary language; the linguistic aspects of the performance of literature; and narrative. Classes combine lecture, group work, discussion, and practical exercises.
PREREQUISITE: English 2850 or English 2860, English 1010 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3910 SPECIAL TOPICS IN LITERATURE
This variable content course is designed to accommodate recent developments and trends in literature. It is an advanced course intended for English majors, with a strong focus on particular themes, writers, or critical approaches. Course descriptions are published in the English Department’s Calendar Supplement.
Three hours a week

3920 CREATIVE WRITING II
This advanced workshop in creative writing provides students with the opportunity to develop further their proficiency in writing fiction, poetry, drama, or creative non-fiction. Students produce new material and revise work-in-progress, and present these manuscripts to the workshop. Class time is devoted to discussion of students’ manuscripts and published texts and to strategies and structures involved in writing them.
PREREQUISITE: English 2120 and permission of instructor
Three hours a week

3930 CREATIVE WRITING III
This is a master-class workshop for students who have demonstrated discipline, ability, and professionalism in their previous writing, editing, and workshop participation. Students revise and finish projects in the genres of one or more of fiction, poetry, scriptwriting, and creative non-fiction, and prepare manuscripts for submission to literary journals and competitions. This course includes public readings and attendance at readings by visiting writers.
PREREQUISITE: English 2120, English 3920, and permission of instructor
Three hours a week

3940 WRITING LIVES: THE ART AND CRAFT OF LIFE-WRITING
This workshop-based course offers students the opportunity to study and to practice genres of writing such as memoir, autobiography, biography, and fictive memoir. Students examine texts with an emphasis on the craft, purpose, and historical context of life-writing. Students produce their own manuscripts, and present these to the workshop for discussion of strategies and structures involved in life-writing.
PREREQUISITE: English 2120 and/or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4010 CAPSTONE IN ARTS
(See Arts 4010)

4040 SPECIAL STUDIES IN COMMUNICATION AND RHETORIC
(See Writing 4040)

4060 ADVANCED STUDIES IN CRITICAL THEORY
PREREQUISITES: English 3060, or English 2060 and permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4150 ADVANCED STUDIES IN TWENTIETH- CENTURY LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: One 3000-level course in twentieth-century literature
Three hours a week

4250 ADVANCED STUDIES IN CANADIAN LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: One 3000-level course in Canadian Literature
Three hours a week

4350 ADVANCED STUDIES IN NINETEENTH- CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: One of English 3350, 3360, or 3370, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4450 ADVANCED STUDIES IN CHILDREN’S LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: English 2450 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4550 ADVANCED STUDIES IN EARLY MODERN LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: English 2560, 3560 or 3580, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4630 ADVANCED STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: One of 3510, 3610, 3620, or 3640, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4650 ADVANCED STUDIES IN EIGHTEENTH- CENTURY LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: English 3650 or 3660, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4660 ADVANCED STUDIES IN GENDER AND SEXUALITY
PREREQUISITE: One 3000-level course in English literature or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4750 ADVANCED STUDIES IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: English 3720, 3750, 3760 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4850 ADVANCED STUDIES IN LINGUISTICS
PREREQUISITE: English 2850, 2860, and 3850, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4860 ADVANCED STUDIES IN CREATIVE WRITING
PREREQUISITE: English 2120 and permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4910 SPECIAL TOPICS IN LITERATURE
This variable content seminar course is designed to accommodate the most recent developments in literature. It is an advanced course for English majors only. The course typically concentrates on a particular author, genre, theme, or methodology not covered by other 4000-level courses. Course descriptions are published in the English Department Calendar Supplement.
PREREQUISITE: At least one 3000-level English course or permission of the instructor.
Three hours a week

4920 DIRECTED STUDIES
With the approval of the Chair and Dean, a senior student of high (usually first class) standing, pursuing an English Major, Minor or Honours degree, may be allowed to explore a special topic under the guidance of a faculty member. Before such approval is granted, the student must obtain the consent of a faculty member to supervise the work and submit, at least one month before enrolling in the course, a detailed proposal of the project, including the area of interest, the method of approach, and a comprehensive bibliography. If the project receives Departmental approval and approval of the Dean, the student may proceed with the study.

4960 HONOURS TUTORIAL
This is an intensive tutorial course in the area of the student’s Honours Thesis, supervised by the student’s Honours Supervisor. Each Honours Tutorial will be developed by the student and advisor and approved by the department as a whole. As part of this course, students will be required to produce a substantive proposal for their Honours Thesis. Other requirements may include annotated bibliographies, preliminary draft work, reading journals, essays. This course is a prerequisite for English 4970.

4970 HONOURS THESIS
Each student is required to complete a substantial scholarly work devised by the student and approved by the English Department. The thesis will be written under the supervision of a member of the English Department and assessed, after a discussion with the student, by a three-member committee consisting of the supervisor, a second reader from the English Department, and an outside examiner, usually from another academic department at the University. Students must complete English 4960 before beginning 4970.

 

Environmental Studies

http://upei.ca/science/environmental-studies

Director
Carolyn Peach Brown, Associate Professor

Overview
The objective of the Bachelor of Environmental Studies program at the University of Prince Edward Island (UPEI) is to equip students as global citizens, with the tools to understand the environmental connections across academic fields, to critically analyze complex environmental issues, and to lead the way in innovation toward sustainable solutions. Environmental issues typically do not respect traditional academic boundaries and require scientific, technical, human and social perspectives to address. As an interdisciplinary liberal arts and science program, the Bachelor of Environmental Studies will provide students with the opportunity to integrate knowledge across faculties of Arts, Science, and Business. In the classroom, in the field and in the community, students will explore how they can make a positive impact toward sustainability in their personal lives, communities and globally.

A student enrolled in the BES will require a total of 120 credit hours or 40 Courses which includes a minimum of 42 credit hours or 14 discipline specific courses with a designation of Environmental Studies (ENV). Of these 14 ENV courses, at least 6 must be at the 3000 level or above, including at least 2 at the 4000 level. There are 5 required core (ENV) courses included as part of the 14 discipline specific courses, one of which requires a 30 hour internship working with a community partner engaged in the environmental field (ENV 3010). There are requirements from the Faculties of Arts, Science, and Business. Students are required to choose one of three specializations:

Environmental Thought and Practice
Island Environments and Sustainability
Environmental Innovation and Change Management

Note: Each specialization has specific required courses (see Specializations tab).

Degree Requirements

ALL BACHELOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (BES) MAJORS

A total of 120 credit hours or 40 courses which includes a minimum of 42 credit hours or 14 discipline specific courses with a designation of Environmental Studies (ENV). Of these 14 ENV courses, at least 6 must be at the 3000 level or above, including at least 2 at the 4000 level. There are 5 required core (ENV) courses included as part of the 14 discipline specific courses.

Five Core Environmental Studies Courses (ENV) = 15 Hours Credit

ENV 1010 – Introduction to Environmental Studies
ENV 2030 – Societies and Sustainability: Past and Present
ENV 2040 – Methods of Environmental Inquiry
ENV 3010 – Environmental Studies Internship
ENV 4010 – Public Scholars on Environmental Issues

At least nine (9) additional Environmental Studies (ENV) courses = 27 Hours Credit (Please note that these 9 courses can be taken as part of a specialization requirement (see Specialization tab) or as an ENV elective to fulfil the requirements indicated above).

CHOICE OF ONE (1) SPECIALIZATION – (see Specialization tab for description and required courses for each Specialization)

REQUIRED COURSES IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS – ALL BES MAJORS

  • One of UPEI 1010, 1020, or 1030 = 3 Hours Credit
  • 3 Foundational Cognate Courses = 9 Hours Credit (Please note that these courses are required in addition to the other requirements for the BES)
    • Biology 1010 – Environmental Biology
    • Philosophy 2030 – Environmental Philosophy
    • Either Sociology 1010 – Introduction to Sociology I OR Anthropology 1050 – Introduction to Anthropology I
  • 1 Course in Statistical Methods = 3 Hours Credit
    • Statistics 1210 – Introductory Statistics (or other course with permission of Director) (Note: Please contact the Director if you lack the requirements for university level Math courses)
  • 4 Foundational Courses from Science and Business that fit the following criteria = 12 Hours Credit (Please note that these courses are required in addition to the other requirements for the BES)
    • 2 Science
    • 2 Science or Business
  • 4 Foundational Courses from Arts that fit the following criteria = 12 Hours Credit (Please note that these courses are required in addition to the other requirements for the BES)
    • It is recommended that students take 1 Political Science or Economics
    • 3 Arts

GENERAL ELECTIVES

The remaining number of semester hours required to complete the requirements for the Bachelor of Environmental Studies (120 credit hours) will be made up from courses selected by the students.

WRITING INTENSIVE COURSE

All graduating students at UPEI must include at least one Writing Intensive course as part of their graduation requirements

  • Either English 3810 – Professional Writing or Business 2110 – Business Communications or other writing intensive course with approval of Director

COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION

Students are expected to apply for a particular specialization at the beginning of their second year. However, it is possible for students to declare a specialization until the end of their third year. Please note that Environmental courses taken as part of a specialization requirement can be used to fulfil the Environmental course requirements for the BES.

ENVIRONMENTAL INNOVATION AND CHANGE MANAGEMENT SPECIALIZATION

The specialization in Environmental Innovation and Change Management focuses on learning how to live within the limits of our environment, and develop innovations to manage the interaction of human activities with and upon the environment in a positive way; to challenge the conventional and move organizations, businesses and communities to invoke positive change.

Two Core Specialization Courses = 6 Hours Credit
ENV 3320 – Environmental Innovation and Change Management Skills
Either Economics 2110 – Introduction to Resource Economics OR Economics 2150 – Environmental Economics

9 credit hours chosen from the following list OR other course with permission of Director:
ENV 2240 – Field Course in Ecological Forestry
ENV 2420 – Society and Natural Resources
ENV 3510 – Sustainable Community Planning
ENV 3540 – Environmental Valuation: Theory and Practice
ENV 4330 – Environmental Communication Strategies
ENV 4950 – Environmental Studies Symposium
ENGN 1520 – Engineering and the Biosphere
BUS 1410 – Marketing
BUS 2650 – Introduction to Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management
BUS 3730 – Tourism Management
PHYS 2610 – Energy, Environment and the Economy
S/A 3410 – Technology, Society and the Environment

ENVIRONMENTAL THOUGHT AND PRACTICE SPECIALIZATION
The specialization in Environmental Thought and Practice focuses on the exploration of the values, attitudes and beliefs of people in relation to the environment in order to provide answers to pressing environmental concerns.

Two Core Specialization Courses = 6 Hours Credit
Either Psychology 1010 – Introduction to Psychology I OR Psychology 3330 – Ecopsychology
Sociology/Anthropology 3410 – Technology, Society and the Environment

9 credit hours chosen from the following list OR other course with permission of Director:
ENV 2420 – Society and Natural Resources
ENV 2310 – Island Environmental Histories
ENV 3420 – Environment and Development
ENV 4110 – Environmental Governance
ENV 4330 – Environmental Communication Strategies
ENV 4950 – Environmental Studies Symposium
ENG 3220 – English-Canadian Poetry
ENG 3620 – 19th-Century American Literature 1830-1910
HIST 4830 – The History of the Environmentalist Movement
PHIL 2060 – Animal Ethics
PHIL 3710 – Community-based Ethical Inquiry

ISLAND ENVIRONMENTS AND SUSTAINABILITY SPECIALIZATION
The Island Environments and Sustainability specialization focuses on the diverse characteristics of islands and islanders’ interaction with the environment in order to gain an understanding of lessons for sustainability in all places.

Two Core Specialization Courses = 6 Hours Credit
IST 2010 – Introduction to Island Studies
Either POLS 2330 – Political Geography OR ENV 3340 – Environmental Stresses on Island Communities

9 credit hours from the following list OR other course with permission of Director:
ENV 2120 – Earth’s Physical Environment
ENV 2310 – Island Environmental Histories
ENV 3110 – Understanding Climate Change
ENV 3210 – Natural Hazards
ENV 3510 – Sustainable Community Planning
ENV 4110 – Environmental Governance
BIO 2220 – Ecology
BIO 3270 – Field Coastal Ecology
BIO 3910 – Marine Biology
BIO 4520 – Biogeography and Macroecology
BIO 4620 – Watershed Ecology
SOC 3050 – Population and Society

CO-OP EDUCATION IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

The UPEI Co-op Program is an integrated approach to university education which enables students to alternate academic terms on campus with work terms in suitable employment. The success of such programs is founded on the principle that students are able to apply theoretical knowledge from course studies in the workplace and return to the classroom with practical workplace experience. Students who successfully complete all the requirements of the program will have the notation entered on their transcripts and on the graduation parchment.

Students accepted into the program complete at least three paid work terms of normally 14 weeks duration, and three professional development courses. Credits earned through completion of work terms are counted as general electives.

The Co-op option is available to full-time students in the Bachelor of Environmental Studies program.  Applications to the Co-op Education Program are normally made after completion of the first year of study.

See the Co-operative Education Program section of the UPEI Academic Calendar for more information.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
A minor in Environmental Studies will be recognized when a student has successfully completed 21 semester hours of courses drawn from Environmental Studies courses and cross-listed courses.

These courses must include:
1) Two core introductory Environmental Studies courses (Environmental Studies 1010 and 2030)
2) A minimum of 6 semester hours in approved courses within the Faculty of Science; and
3) A minimum of 6 semester hours in approved courses within the Faculty of Arts; and
4) A minimum of 3 semester hours in approved courses within the Faculty of Arts or Faculty of Science.

APPROVED COURSES ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES MINOR
Students who do not have the required prerequisites for particular courses that are cross-listed in the Environmental Studies Program are encouraged to consult with the instructors of these courses to seek their permission to enrol. Instructors may choose to admit students to these courses based upon alternative prerequisites that are judged to provide the student with sufficient background preparation for the course.

Faculty of Science
**Biology 1010 – Current Issues in Environmental Biology
Biology 1320 – Introduction to Organisms
Biology 2220 – Ecology
Biology 3140 – Plant Community Ecology
Biology 3270 – Field Coastal Ecology
Biology 3910 – Marine Biology
Biology 4110 – Principles of Wildlife Biology
Biology 4520 – Biogeography and Macroecology
Biology 4540 – Biodiversity and Conservation Biology
Biology 4620 – Watershed Ecology
Biology 4650 – Marine Community Ecology
Biology 4850 – Environmental Toxicology
Chemistry 2020 – Environmental Chemistry
Physics 2610 – Energy, Environment and the Economy

** Students may only credit either Biology 1010 or Biology 1320 toward their minor.

Faculty of Arts
Economics 2110 – Introduction to Resource Economics
Economics 2150- Environmental Economics
Economics 3520 – Applied Resource Economics
English 3220 – English Canadian Poetry
English 3310 – The Literature of Atlantic Canada
English 3350 – British Romantic Literature
History 4830 – History of the Environmental Movement
Island Studies 2010 – Introduction to Island Studies
Philosophy 1020 – Introduction to Ethics and Social Philosophy
Philosophy 1050 – Technology, Values, and Science
Philosophy 2030 – Environmental Philosophy
Philosophy 2060 – Animal Ethics
Philosophy 3710 – Community-Based Ethical Inquiry
Psychology 3330 – Ecopsychology
Sociology 3050 – Population and Society
Sociology/Anthropology 3410 – Technology, Society and the Environment

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES COURSES

1010 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (Core Course)
This course introduces students to a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approach to the study of environmental issues; and emphasizes the interrelationships among the various physical, biological, and human systems. It examines major contemporary environmental issues, such as global warming and land use, and focuses on how these issues are understood and addressed within the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities.
Three hours a week (some field trips may be required)
Three semester hours of credit

2030 SOCIETIES AND SUSTAINABILITY: PAST AND PRESENT (Core Course)
This course explores the concept of sustainability in relation to how societies have interacted with the environment overtime. Through exploration of successes and failures from historical and contemporary societies, students will develop the capacity to understand the ecological context in which humans live, to recognize limits, and to design sustainable human systems for the future.
Three semester hours of credit

2040 METHODS OF ENVIRONMENTAL INQUIRY (Core Course)
This course introduces students to the diverse nature of inquiry in the various fields of environmental studies. Through practical case studies it provides literacy in key methods used in understanding the environment in the sciences, social sciences and humanities.
PREREQUISITE: ENV 1010 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

2090 SPECIAL TOPICS
To create a category for uniquely titled courses offered by a department and put on the timetable as a “special course” on a one-time basis.
Three semester hours of credit

2120 EARTH’S PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT
This course will introduce students to the basic ‘building blocks’ of Earth’s physical characteristics, providing a foundation on which to develop more specialist knowledge in their understanding of Environmental Studies. It will examine the geologic and geomorphic cycles, including processes of weathering, erosion, transportation and deposition, and investigate how these create fluvial, glacial, and coastal landforms and impacts on human activity. It also aims to address atmospheric processes and the links between global climate zones and world ecosystems.
Three semester hours of credit

2240 FIELD COURSE IN ECOLOGICAL FORESTRY
This course introduces students to the principles and practices of ecological forestry management. By combining theory-based lectures and an experiential learning approach at the MacPhail Woods Ecological Forestry site students will gain a deep understanding of the forest and forest restoration efforts.
Three semester hours of credit

2310 ISLAND ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORIES
Environmental history is broadly defined as the study of continuity and change in human relationships with the environment. This course introduces students to environmental history and historical methods with a focus on historic and current, interaction with the environment on global islands. Special focus will be given to ocean, forest, and land use activity in Prince Edward Island and islands in the Atlantic region.
PREREQUISITE: ENV 1010 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

2420 SOCIETY AND NATURAL RESOURCES
This course examines the development, use and conservation of natural resources. It explore the definition of natural resources, the history of resource use, governance regimes, and theories and practices around integrated resource planning and management, ecosystem management, adaptive management, conflict resolution approaches, local knowledge and public participation. Case studies explore recent trends in forestry, fisheries, agriculture, parks and recreation, wildlife, and water resources management.
PREREQUISITE: ENV 1010 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

2910 DIRECTED STUDIES
This course offers recognition for equivalency-learning to returned CUSO cooperants and interns who have completed an international development placement overseas. Students who have completed a CUSO placement with a focus on environmental issues – such as environmental science, resource management, conservation, environmental education – can apply to receive credit toward their Environmental Studies degree.
Three semester hours of credit

3010 ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES INTERNSHIP (Core Course)
This course provides students with opportunities to develop, integrate and apply their knowledge of environmental issues and theory. Students will be involved in ‘internship’ experiences with varied environmental organizations, in environmental action research on campus issues or in other settings, and in developing personal plans for environmental action and change. Classroom discussions and written work will aid students in developing a multidisciplinary and systems approach to the analysis of these experiences.
PREREQUISITE: ENV 1010. Students taking this course concurrently may apply for admission to the instructor.
One and a half hours per week in class, two and a half hours per week in practicum work
Three semester hours of credit

3090 SPECIAL TOPICS
To create a category for uniquely titled courses offered by a department and put on the timetable as a “special course” on a one-time basis.
PREREQUISITE: ENV 1010 or ENV 2030 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

3110 UNDERSTANDING CLIMATE CHANGE
This course introduces students to the science of climate change. Students explore its social and political implications, and examine its impact on daily life by reviewing current scientific data as it relates to vulnerabilities of particular regions. Topics include methods, strategies, and technologies that address climate change, using case studies of adaptive and mitigative programs in North America, with a special emphasis on Canada’s climate action plan.
PREREQUISITE: Environmental Studies 1010 or 2030
Three hours a week
Three semester hours of credit

3210 NATURAL HAZARDS
This course provides an introduction to the causes of a variety of natural hazards (tectonic – e.g. earthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanic activity; meteorological – e.g. hurricanes and flooding; and mass movement – e.g. landslides, mudslides, and avalanches) as well as their impact on human activities and the strategies available to predict and manage such events.
PREREQUISITE: ENV 1010 or ENV 2030 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

3320 ENVIRONMENTAL INNOVATION AND CHANGE MANAGEMENT SKILLS
This course will introduce students to a general overview of innovations to address environmental goals. It will examine how using a structured approach to change can move organizations, businesses and communities toward more environmentally sustainable practices.
PREREQUISITE: ENV 1010 or ENV 2030 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

3340 ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSES ON ISLAND COMMUNITIES
This course explores the risk and vulnerabilities associated with climate change and other environmental stress on island communities. This course will focus on the special characteristics of island communities and will explore island vulnerabilities in the natural and built environment as well as in social and economic systems.
PREREQUISITE: ENV 1010 or ENV 2030 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

3420 ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT
This course focuses on environment and development issues in an international, particularly a developing country, context. Issues related to trade, biodiversity conservation, agriculture, climate change, wealth, poverty, population, and gender will be explored.
PREREQUISITE: ENV 1010 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

3510 SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY PLANNING
An overview of how planning tools and practice shape the form of communities, including: (1) Key issues and principles of sustainability at a community scale; as well as related planning approaches; (2) Sustainable community planning approaches and tools for identifying and achieving quality of life, and (3) The components and process of developing an integrated sustainable community plan. Students will learn how to assess community capital, identify and recruit key stakeholders and develop, implement, monitor and evaluate a community plan.
PREREQUISITE: ENV 1010 or ENV 2030 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

3540 ENVIRONMENTAL VALUATION: THEORY AND PRACTICE
This course would develop the theory and techniques in the valuation of non-market (ecological) good and services. It will focus on the techniques and methods for placing monetary values on the environment and incorporating them into economic decision making at both the macro and project level.
PREREQUISITE: ENV 1010 or ENV 2030 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

4010 PUBLIC SCHOLARS ON ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES (Core Course)
This seminar course will provide a forum for students to interact and learn from local, national and international experts in various fields of environmental studies. Students will gain an increased awareness and understanding of the diverse ways in which our society is addressing issues related to the environment. The course will provide opportunities for students to develop in their own expertise as public scholars.
PREREQUISITE: ENV 3010 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

4090 SPECIAL TOPICS
To create a category for uniquely titled courses offered by a department and put on the timetable as a “special course” on a one-time basis.
PREREQUISITE: ENV 1010 or ENV 2030 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

4110 ENVIRONMENTAL GOVERNANCE
This course focuses on developing an understanding of principles, practices and emerging issues relating to environmental governance. An emphasis is placed on exploring the roles of governments, markets and collective action in environmental policy and management. Examples of governance arrangements are drawn from different parts of the world and different ecological contexts, including the uniqueness of island contexts.
Cross-listed with Island Studies 6190
PREREQUISITES: ENV 1010 or permission of the instructor. For students taking the course as IST 6190 they need to be an active graduate student
Three semester hours of credit

4310 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT
This course examines Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) from philosophical, methodological and institutional perspectives. The evolution of EIA in Canada will be the focus. The strategic role of EIA will be explored as to its effectiveness as a tool for achieving sustainability goals. Case studies illustrating major issues and applications will be presented at a variety of geographical scales. Some field trips may be required.
Cross-listed with ESC 8030
PREREQUISITES: ENV 1010 or with permission of instructor
Three semester hours of credit

4330 ENVIRONMENTAL COMMUNICATION STRATEGIES
This course promotes the development of communication skills in the context of environmental issues and exposes students to direct interaction with representatives from industry, government and the community. The course will also provide broad theoretical and practical knowledge needed to resolve disputes as well as skills training in techniques of mediation, facilitation, and negotiation.
Cross-listed with ESC 8020
PREREQUISITE: ENV 1010 or ENV 2030 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

4410 ENVIRONMENT AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
Ecological problems such as climate change and resource scarcity transcend the boundaries of nation-states and therefore necessitate international cooperation between states and non-state actors. This course will examine the dynamics of global environmental politics.
PREREQUISITE: ENV 1010 or ENV 2030 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

4910-4920 DIRECTED STUDIES
These courses offer students the opportunity for the study of other subjects in environmental studies in two different forms: (1) In response to an individual student’s needs, a program of directed readings or directed research can be developed with a faculty member; (2) Directed Studies courses are offered on occasion by members of the faculty or by visiting instructors. (See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
Three hours a week
Three semester hours of credit

4950 ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES SYMPOSIUM
The Student Environmental Studies Symposium course is an opportunity for students to facilitate a public forum to raise awareness and discussion about a contemporary environmental issue. This unique course will focus on students planning and running a one day symposium about a relevant environmental issue of their choice. It will provide an opportunity for active and collaborative learning as students dialogue with important stakeholders engaged in real world issues from government, the private sector and civil society. Through the process of organizing this symposium, students will deepen their knowledge of the complex nature of environmental issues and the challenges in finding sustainable solutions. Practical outcomes of the course include the development of critical thinking and writing skills, as well as organizational, communication and team-building skills.
PREREQUISITE: ENV 1010 or ENV 2030 or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

CROSS-LISTED COURSES (APPROVED LIST OF SCIENCE, BUSINESS AND ARTS COURSES)

Applied Human Sciences:
Foods and Nutrition 2230 – Nutrition and Dietary Behaviour

Biology: (please note that Biology 1310-1320 are required as prerequisites for the other Biology courses below)
1010 – Current Issues in Environmental Biology
1310 – Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
1320 – Introduction to Organisms
2220 – Ecology
2020 – Botany
2040 – Zoology
3110 – Plants and People
3140 – Plant Community Ecology
3270 – Field Coastal Ecology
3510 – Ornithology
3710 – Life of Mammals
3910 – Marine Biology
4520 – Biogeography and Macroecology
4540 – Biodiversity and Conservation Biology
4620 – Watershed Ecology
4650 – Marine Community Ecology
4850 – Environmental Toxicology

Chemistry: (please note that Chemistry 1110-1120 are required as prerequisites for the other Chemistry courses below)
1110 – General Chemistry I
1120 – General Chemistry II
2020 – Environmental Chemistry
2430 – Organic Chemistry for the Life Sciences

Engineering:
1510 – Engineering and the Biosphere
2120 – Geology for Engineers

Physics:
2610 – Energy, Environment and the Economy

Business:
1010 – Introduction to Business
1410 – Marketing
1710 – Organizational Behaviour
2110 – Business Communication
2510 – Introduction to Management Science
2650 – Introduction to Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management
2750 – Introduction to Biotechnology
3730 – Tourism Management

Arts:
Economics:
2110 – Introduction to Resource Economics
2150 – Environmental Economics
2830 – Agricultural Economics
3520 – Applied Resource Economics

English:
3220 – English Canadian Poetry
3310 – The Literature of Atlantic Canada
3350 – British Romantic Literature
3620 – 19th century American literature, 1830-1910

History:
2310 – The Atlantic Region
3310 – History of Prince Edward Island: Pre-Confederation
3320 – History of Prince Edward Island: Post-Confederation
4830 – History of the Environmental Movement

International Development Studies:
2010 – Introduction to International Development Studies

Modern Languages:
2110 – Latin American Studies: South America

Philosophy:
1020 – Introduction to Ethics and Social Philosophy
1050 – Technology, Values, and Science
1110 – Critical Thinking
2060 – Animal Ethics
3010 – Philosophy of Science
3710 – Community-Based Ethical Inquiry

Political Science:
1010 – Introductory Politics I: Government and Politics in Liberal Democracies
1020 – Introductory Politics II: Political Ideologies in Liberal Democracies
2530 – Introduction to Political Theory

Psychology:
1010 – Introduction to Psychology: Part I
2420 – Introduction to Social Psychology
3330 – Ecopsychology
3620 – Ergonomics

Religious Studies:
1020 – Religions of the World: Eastern Traditions

Sociology:
1020 – Introduction to Sociology II
2710 – Self and Society
2820 – Social Psychology
3050 – Population and Society
3320 – Methodology and Research II
3720 – Collective Behaviour and Social Movements
3920 – Media and Society

Sociology/Anthropology:
1060 – Introduction to Anthropology II
2220 – Native Canadians
2660 – Science, Culture and Society
3410 – Technology, Society, and the Environment

 

Fine Arts

http://upei.ca/finearts

Fine Arts (art history) is a discipline which examines the role of the visual arts in the development of human society. Fine Arts attempts to understand the nature of art, its origins and evolution, and the role it plays in various civilizations. While the task of the artist is the creation of works of art, that of the art historian is their systematic study, analyzing and understanding the products of creative expression. Studies of the Fine Arts can involve the examination of economic, social, and political issues; problems of patronage, taste, style, and iconography; and questions of literary influence, philology, philosophy, psychology, and religion. At the same time, how works of art are made, their conservation and/or restoration and theories of perception or optics are also investigated.

The study of Fine Arts helps to enhance our aesthetic awareness and our ability to “see” and describe and to search for new meanings and explore new ideas in our environment. The Department of Fine Arts offers a range of art history courses, especially Western art, from ancient times to the present. The art history courses concentrate on the study of architecture, sculpture, painting, and minor/decorative arts.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN FINE ARTS
Students in the Minor Program in Fine Arts must take FAH 1010 and FAH 1020 consecutively as prerequisites and five other courses including at least two at the 2000 level and at least two at the 3000 or 4000 level.

FINE ARTS COURSES

FAH—Fine Arts History

FAH 1010 INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF WESTERN ART I
This course is a survey of the development of visual arts from Prehistoric to Medieval times. Emphasis is placed on the study of major works of art, methods of analysis, use of proper terminology, historical and cultural contexts, and changes of forms and styles.
Cross-listed with History 1030.
Three hours a week

FAH 1020 INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF WESTERN ART II
This course is a continuation of the survey begun in FAH 101. It covers the most representative works of the visual arts from the early Renaissance period through the Modern era. The major artistic achievements and stylistic changes are studied with particular emphasis on their relationship to historical and cultural circumstances.
Cross-listed with History 1040.
Three hours a week

FAH 2010 EGYPTIAN AND MESOPOTAMIAN ART
This course examines (in chronological order) the changes of style in architecture, painting, sculpture, and the minor/decorative arts from the prehistoric periods in Egypt and Mesopotamia to the establishment of the Hellenistic kingdoms in both regions. The characteristics of each period are considered with emphasis on the outstanding works of art/architecture and their historical contexts.
Cross-listed with Classics 2310.
Three hours a week

FAH 2020 GREEK ART
This course examines (in chronological order) the changes of style in architecture, painting, sculpture, and the minor/decorative arts from the Archaic period to the end of the Hellenistic age. The characteristics of each period are considered with emphasis on the outstanding works of art/architecture and their historical contexts.
Cross-listed with Classics 2320.
Three hours a week

FAH 2110 ROMAN ART
This course examines (in chronological order) the changes of style in architecture, painting, sculpture, and the minor/ decorative arts from the beginning of the Roman Republic to the end of the Imperial era. The characteristics of each period are considered with emphasis on the outstanding works of art/ architecture and their historical contexts.
Cross-listed with Classics 2410.
Three hours a week

FAH 2120 MEDIEVAL ART
This course examines (in chronological order) the changes of style in architecture, painting (especially illuminated manuscripts), sculpture, and the minor/decorative arts from the Byzantine period to the end of the Gothic era in Europe. The characteristics of each period are considered with emphasis on the outstanding works of art/architecture and their historical contexts.
Cross-listed with Religious Studies 2720.
Three hours a week

FAH 3010 RENAISSANCE ART
This course examines the artistic milieu in Europe — with a particular emphasis upon the Italian and Flemish schools — from the early Fifteenth Century to the mid-Sixteenth Century.
Three hours a week

FAH 3020 BAROQUE AND ROCOCO ART
This course examines (in chronological order) the changes of style in architecture, painting, sculpture, and the minor/decorative arts in Italy and other parts of Europe from the early Seventeenth Century to the end of the Eighteenth Century. The characteristics of each period are considered with emphasis on the outstanding works of art/architecture and their historical contexts.
Three hours a week

FAH 3110 NINETEENTH-CENTURY ART
The evolution of the visual arts is studied from the French Revolution to the Post-Impressionist era. Neoclassicism, Romanticism, revival styles, Realism, and Impressionism are the subject areas of the course.
Three hours a week

FAH 3120 TWENTIETH-CENTURY ART
This course is designed to develop an understanding of the various artistic expressions in the visual arts, including the new art forms of photography and cinema, from the late Nineteenth Century to the present.
Three hours a week

FAH 3210 CANADIAN ART
The development of the visual arts in Canada is studied from the Seventeenth Century (colonial times) to the present. The course examines the native tradition in Canada, the legacy of the early French and English settlers, and later developments in the visual arts within the context of the socio-economic and political history of the country.
Three hours a week

FAH 4510-4520 DIRECTED STUDIES
These courses involve the examination of particular problems in specific areas of interest in the visual arts and archaeology.* Individual studies are conducted under faculty guidance. Open to qualified students from any discipline.
(See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)
*Archaeology of Roman Pannonia and of early Medieval times in Western Hungary. Fieldwork in Hungary.

History

http://upei.ca/history

History Faculty
Andrew Robb, Professor Emeritus
James Moran, Professor, Chair
Ian Dowbiggin, Professor
Edward MacDonald, Professor
Susan Brown, Associate Professor
Lisa Chilton, Associate Professor
Richard G. Kurial, Associate Professor
Richard Raiswell, Associate Professor
Sharon Myers, Assistant Professor

HISTORY PROGRAM

History has been defined as the “memory of human group experience” because it brings the student into contact with the whole range of human effort and achievement. Its object is to recreate the past from the evidence left to us, and to try to explain how and why human beings spoke, acted, and thought as they did in the past. Although history must always deal with the “facts” of societies, it is even more concerned with explaining and illuminating them.

The program is centred broadly on the history of “Atlantic Civilization”—the historical development of Europe and the Americas. The courses aim to provide both a broad exposure to the history of the Atlantic World, and more specialized work in the history of various regions and countries. The Department also offers courses in the practice and the craft of history.

AREA COURSES
The Department offers the following “streams”—Canadian, USA, British, European, Global, and Others:

Canadian

1010 Canadian History—Pre-Confederation
1020 Canadian History—Post-Confederation
2310 The Atlantic Region
2320 The Atlantic Region
3250 Canadian Social History to World War I
3260 Canadian Social History since World War I
3310 History of Prince Edward Island— Pre-Confederation
3320 History of Prince Edward Island— Post-Confederation
3520 The History of Quebec and French Canada
3530 Canada and The First World War
3850 Women in 19th-Century Canada
3860 Women, the Law, and Civil Rights in 20th-Century Canada
4150 Canada Apologizes: Studies in Historical Apologies
4240 History of Canadian Nationalism and the Canadian Identity
4250 Childhood in Modern Canada
4260 A History of the Canadian Working Classes
4890 20th-Century Prince Edward Island

USA
2410 United States History—From the Colonial Period to Reconstruction
2420 United States History since Reconstruction
3330 Health Care and North American Society in Historical Perspective
3910 The United States from 1900 through World War II
3920 The United States since World War II
3930 The American Mind and Imagination: From the Puritans to the Progressives
3940 20th-Century American Intellectual History
3950 Race & Ethnicity in American Life: A History of Immigration
3960 Race & Ethnicity in American Life: African-American History
3970 Race & Ethnicity in American Life: The Hispanic- American Experience
4410 United States Foreign Policy from the Revolutionary Period through World War I
4420 United States Foreign Policy since World War I

British
2610 Britain in the Age of Revolutions: 1688-1860
2620 Rule Britannia to Cool Britannia: Britain 1860-2000
3100 Tudor England, 1485-1603: Creation of a Nation
3620 Victorian Britain
3630 Modern Irish History
4720 Britain in the 20th-Century: Society, Culture and Identity
4730 The Rise of Consumer Society: British Society in the 18th-Century

European
3030 Power, Culture and Consumption: The Renaissance in Italy
3050 Martyrs, Marauders, Clerics and Kings: The Culture of the European Middle Ages
3110 Science, Magic, Witchcraft, and the Occult in Premodern Europe
3230 Russian History since 1682
3410 German History since 1648
3420 History of France since 1500
4040 Monsters, Gold, and Glory: Travel, Trade and the Problem of Discovery in Premodern Europe
4110 Europe Since Bismarck
4850 The Ideas that changed Modern European History

Global
2150 Foreign Foods: Eating in the Age of Empires
2220 From Magic to the Double Helix: Science and Society in Historical Perspective
3210 History of Christianity to the Reformation
3220 History of Christianity from the Reformation to the Present
3270 Migration to Canada I
3280 Migration to Canada II
3710 The Atlantic World I
3720 The Atlantic World II
3730 The Second World War in Global Context
3750 Tourism in western Society: The Travel Imperative
3760 The History of Genocide
4050 Crusades and Crusading
4320 Britain and the Imperial Experience
4340 Madness and Society
4550 War and Revolution in the 20th Century World
4830 The History of the Environmentalist Movement

Other
1110 Discovering the Past
1130 Crime and Punishment: Historical Themes
1140 Plaque: Historical Themes
1150 Nazi Germany: Historical Themes
1160 The Devil in Western Society: Historical Themes
1170 Rock and Roll From Presley to Punk: Historical Themes
2110 The History Workshop: Skills and Methods in History
3120 Themes and Debates in History
4840 Applied Public History
4910 Directed Studies
4920 Directed Studies
4970 Honours Tutorial in Historiography
4980 Honours Graduating Essay

Normally, students who intend to major in History will choose History 1010/1020 as their introduction to history. These courses include an important tutorial component emphasizing introductory skills and methods of history.

2000-level courses provide introductions to the histories of civilizations, regions, and countries, especially in the areas listed above. They are intended to build upon the skills acquired in first year History courses.

3000-level courses provide more specialized studies in a number of areas.

4000-level courses are usually seminars emphasizing discussion and research in more specialized areas.

While providing courses for students in all faculties, schools, and departments, the Department also provides a minor, major, and honours program for those who have a special interest in the study of history.

MAJOR PROGRAM

To register as a major in History, a student must complete History 1010/1020 and six semester hours (2 courses) at the 2000 level. Students are urged to take History 2010/2020 in the first or second year to satisfy the second requirement. Students may take additional 2000-level courses.

History 1010/1020, 2010/2020, 2110, and 3120 are compulsory for students in the major program.

History 1010/1020, 2010/2020, and 2110 should be completed by the end of the fourth semester.

History 3120 should be completed no later than the end of the sixth semester.

A major program is complete when a student has successfully completed a minimum of 42 hours of credit in History (14 courses) of which a minimum of 9 hours (3 courses) must be at the 3000 level, and 9 hours (3 courses) must be at the 4000 level. Majors must complete courses totalling 6 semester hours of credit at the 2000-4000 levels in three of the five areas of study: Europe, Britain, the USA, Canada, and Global.

HONOURS PROGRAM

To be admitted to the honours program, the student must submit a letter of application to the Honours Coordinator. Applicants must be registered in, or have completed, the major program. Applications are normally submitted during the fourth or fifth semester. Decisions on admission are made by the department acting as a committee of the whole. Admissions decisions will be made on the basis of demonstrated and potential ability to carry out independent research and sustained historical analysis. Meeting the minimum entry requirements does not guarantee admission.

Applicants must have a minimum average of 70% in all previous University courses. Normally, the Department expects an average of at least 75% in all previous history courses.

In addition to the courses required for the major, honours students are required to complete History 4970 and 4980.

Each honours student must prepare a graduating honours essay under the direction of a supervisor. This essay will be evaluated by a three-person committee, one member of which will be from outside the Department.

The candidate must take a final oral examination on the essay.

Students intending to enter graduate programs should be aware that many such programs require a reading knowledge of a second language. Undergraduate courses in a second language are a useful preparation for graduate work in history.

An honours program is complete when the student completes:
1. a total of 126 semester hours of course credits with a mini- mum overall average of 70%;
2. a total of 48 semester hours of course credits in History (6 semester hours in addition to the minimum required for the major), with a minimum average of 75%.

CREDITS FOR CROSS-LISTED COURSES

The Department accepts as part of its major or honours program a maximum of 12 hours (4 courses) of courses cross-credited to History from related disciplines. Of such courses, students can apply 6 hours (2 courses) taken at the 1000 or 2000 levels and 6 hours (2 courses) at the 3000 or 4000 levels. Students must have the prior approval of the Chair of History if credit is to be granted. The courses from related disciplines which may be approved for credit are the following:

Asian Studies 2010 Introduction to West Asia
Asian Studies 2020 Introduction to East Asia
Economics 3110/3120 History of Economic Thought
English 3780 The Medieval Book
Fine Arts History 1010/1020 Art History
Religious Studies 3310/3320 History of Christianity

MINOR PROGRAMS

HISTORY MINOR
To complete a minor in History, the student must complete History 1010/1020 and five other history courses (15 semester hours), including

  • one Canadian history,
    one continental European history,
    one course each out of two of the following three fields: British history, USA history, and Global history,
    one other history course.
    At least two of the student’s courses must be at the 3000 level or above.

MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE STUDIES MINOR
A minor in Medieval and Renaissance Studies will be recognized when a student has completed 21 semester hours in Medieval and Renaissance courses, including History 2010 and six other courses from at least three different departments. At least one course must be at the 4000 level.

The following courses would all be eligible to be counted towards the minor. Not all courses listed are available in any given year.

Classics 1010: Latin 1
Classics 1020: Latin 2
English 2550: Introduction to Shakespeare
English 2560: Shakespeare in Film and Media
English 2750: Arthurian Literature
English 3560: Renaissance Literature
English 3570: Renaissance Drama
English 3580: Milton
English 3720: Chaucer
English 3750: Middle English Literature
English 3780: The Medieval Book
English 4550: Advanced Studies in Early Modern Literature
English 4750: Advanced Studies in Medieval Literature
Fine Arts 2120: Medieval Art
Fine Arts 3010: Renaissance Art
French 4010: Renaissance Literature
French 4020: Le moyen-age
History 2010: European Civilization 500 BC-1648
History 3030: Power, Culture and Consumption: The Renaissance in Italy
History 3050: Martyrs, Marauders, Clerics and Kings: The Culture of the European Middle Ages
History 3100: Tudor England – 1485-1603
History 3110: Science Magic, Witchcraft and the Occult in Pre-modern Europe
History 4040: Monsters, Gold, and Glory: Travel, Trade, and the Problem of Discovery in Premodern Europe
History 4050: Crusades and Crusading
Philosophy 2480 (RS 2840): Introduction to Medieval Theology and Philosophy
Religious Studies 3760: Thomas Aquinas and the Thomistic Tradition
Spanish 4050: The Legacy of the Spanish Mystics
Spanish 4070: Spanish Medieval Literature
Spanish 4150: Cervantes’ Don Quixote and the Formation of the Modern Novel

DIRECTED STUDIES

History 4910/4920 (Directed Studies courses) are designed to allow students to pursue an area of study of their own interest which may not be offered by the curriculum. Directed Studies courses are usually restricted to qualified Third and Fourth Year students in any discipline. The program of study in the course must be approved by the Instructor, the Chair, and the Dean of the Faculty prior to registration.

HISTORY COURSES

1010 CANADIAN HISTORY—PRE-CONFEDERATION
This course surveys topics of historical importance in Canadian history up to and including the attainment of Confederation. The emphasis is on the interaction between political events and change in the economy and society. Tutorials examine various historical interpretations of the Canadian experience.
Lecture: Two hours a week
Tutorial: One hour a week

1020 CANADIAN HISTORY—POST-CONFEDERATION
This course surveys topics of historical importance in Canadian history in the Post-Confederation period. The emphasis is on the interaction between political events and change in the economy and society. Tutorials examine various historical interpretations of the Canadian experience.
Lecture: Two hours a week
Tutorial: One hour a week

1030 INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF WESTERN ART I
(See Fine Arts History 1010)

1040 INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF WESTERN ART II
(See Fine Arts History 1020)

1110 DISCOVERING THE PAST
This course is a unique and exciting chance for students to work closely with each other and with a professor in a seminar, applying the techniques of historical investigation to shed light on one particular issue. These techniques include; the careful analysis of primary sources; an appreciation that there are different historical interpretations of the same subject; an understanding of how the subject under investigation changes over time. Instead of regular lectures, in each class students work through a series of carefully selected readings which forms the basis for interactive discussions. Each year, the seminar is devoted to a different historical issue, and is led by a different professor from the History Department.

1130 CRIME AND PUNISHMENT: HISTORICAL THEMES
This course provides an introduction to changing ideas and practices surrounding crime and punishment over time. Topics may include who has been identified as a threat to the social order, including thieves, prostitutes, vagrants, and young offenders, and the punishments that societies have deemed appropriate for criminals, including public executions, exile, and imprisonment. Additionally, the course provides opportunities to explore and to develop skills in historical thinking and methods.
Three credit hours; lecture, discussion

1140 PLAGUE: HISTORICAL THEMES
This course introduces students to plague, an important aspect of disease and health history. From the devastating outbreaks of the Black Death in medieval Europe, to the contemporary phenomenon of Ebola, the course focuses on the ways in which major outbreaks of infectious disease have shaped societies. The course considers the medical, social, economic, and political consequences of epidemics and pandemics. The course explores how various forms of plague were understood when they happened, and how our views of them have changed over time. This will be done by reading important works on plagues, and by examining original sources that were produced by those living through major disease outbreaks as they unfolded.
Three credit hours; lecture, discussion

1150 NAZI GERMANY
This course covers the history of Adolf Hitler’s Third Reich (1933-1945) from the origins of the Nazi Party during the Weimar Republic (1919-1933) to the post-World War II trials of German war criminals. Topics include Hitler’s life and career, the Nazi Party’s electoral success, the causes and course of World War II from the German perspective, the Holocaust, and the relations between the churches and the Nazi regime. The course seeks to answer the question: why did Germans support Hitler?
Three credit hours

1160 THE DEVIL IN WESTERN SOCIETY: HISTORICAL THEMES
From Megiddo and Patmos, through the sewers of nineteenth-century Paris and into the studios of America’s televangelists, this course will examine how the figure of the devil has been made and remade over the centuries in response to broader historical trends. Topics may include: the ancient combat myth; the devil in the Christian scriptures; Satan and Lucifer; the devil and the saints; the idea of hell; monks and demons; demonic witchcraft; the development of exorcism; Protestant devils; the devil in art, literature and film; the demonization of outsiders; devils and the New World and Old; comedic devils; and the devil in the modern American consciousness.
Three credit hours

1170 ROCK AND ROLL FROM PRESLEY TO PUNK: HISTORICAL THEMES
This course explores the social, cultural, and political contexts for the evolution of rock and roll music during the post-Second World War era when a new musical form was grafted onto the popular music industry. Beginning with the roots of rock and roll music in African American communities, the course follows the progress of rock and roll music from the early 1950s to the Punk era of the late 1970s, focusing on the symbiotic relationship between iconic performers and their times.
Three credit hours, Lecture and Discussion

2010 EUROPEAN CIVILIZATION 500 BC-1648
This introductory course examines the history of European civilization from the rise of classical Greece to the Treaty of Westphalia in 1648. Lectures analyze the major political, economic, social, and cultural forces which shaped European society during this period.
Lecture: Three hours a week

2020 EUROPEAN CIVILIZATION 1648 TO THE PRESENT
This introductory course examines the history of European civilization from the end of the Thirty Years’ War to the present. Lectures analyze the main political, economic, social, and cultural forces which shaped Europe from the early modern to the post-industrial period.
Lecture: Three hours a week

2090 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for Special Topics offered by the Department of History at the second year level.

2110 THE HISTORY WORKSHOP: SKILLS AND METHODS IN HISTORY
This introductory course offers students the opportunity to develop their research, writing and critical thinking skills while introducing them to the nature of historical method and inquiry. The course provides instruction and practice in the use of standard print and electronic bibliographic tools and in the writing of research, analytical and critical papers in history. Topics of study include the relationship between history and truth, the uses of evidence and argumentation, and the varieties of historical research. The course features library workshops as well as experience using local archives.
Lecture/Discussion/ Workshops: Three hours a week

2150 FOREIGN FOODS: EATING IN THE AGE OF EMPIRES
Food has been understood in a variety of ways: spices to preserve and mask rotting meats; sugar, chocolate and raisins as cure-alls; cocoa as a hallucinogen; potatoes as a plot to kill off surplus peasants; porridge as a middle-class conspiracy to undermine working-class culture. In this course we use intrinsically interesting case studies to explore important themes in the history of food discovery, distribution, and consumption. Underlying themes may include the use of unfree labour, the expansion of a capitalist economic system, the growth and evolution of European imperialism, and negotiations in social relations along class, gender, and racial/ethnic lines.
Three credit hours

2220 FROM MAGIC TO THE DOUBLE HELIX: SCIENCE AND SOCIETY IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE
This course evaluates the history of science from the scientific revolution to late twentieth century. It also evaluates how science has been understood differently from one period to the next, how science has been grounded in cultural, social, and political currents, and how scientific understandings and perceptions have influenced how we see the world around us. This survey includes the study of major changes in scientific outlook brought about by thinkers like Isaac Newton, Auguste Comte, Louis Pasteur, Charles Darwin, Marie Curie and Albert Einstein. Important technological developments and the professionalization of scientific knowledge are also considered.
Three semester hours

2310 THE ATLANTIC REGION
This course examines Atlantic Canada from the early interactions between the Mi’kmaq and Beothuk and the Europeans in the 16th century through to the middle of the 19th century when Atlantic Canadians adopted a modern vision of democratic culture and social improvement. Topics of study will include native-newcomer interactions, the growth of Acadia and the Expulsion of the Acadians, the impact of the Planters and Loyalists, the Land Question on PEI, ethno-religious tension, social reform movements, and the question of Confederation.
Three hours a week

2320 THE ATLANTIC REGION
A continuation of History 2310.
Three hours a week

2410 UNITED STATES HISTORY—FROM THE COLONIAL PERIOD TO RECONSTRUCTION
This survey course in United States History begins with the Colonial period and concludes with an examination of the Civil War and Reconstruction. It covers a variety of topics in social, political, economic, diplomatic, military, and constitutional history.
Lecture: Three hours a week

2420 UNITED STATES HISTORY SINCE RECONSTRUCTION
This survey course in modern United States History examines industrial and urban development, modern political trends, social themes, and the development of the United States as a world power. Topics covered include Progressivism, the American role in World War I and World War II, the New Deal, and contemporary American society.
Lecture: Three hours a week

2520 ROMAN CIVILIZATION
(See Classics 1020)

2610 BRITAIN IN THE AGE OF REVOLUTIONS: 1688-1860
This course surveys the major political, social and cultural developments in British history from the “Glorious Revolution” of 1688 to the age of the industrial revolution. Topics include the changing role of the monarchy, political patronage and social elites, crime and the law, radical political movements in the era of the French revolution, the growth of industrialization and its impact on working and living conditions, poverty and disease in Victorian cities, Irish nationalism, family life and “Victorian values,” and imperial conflicts in India and the Crimea.
Lecture: Three hours a week

2620 RULE BRITANNIA TO COOL BRITANNIA: BRITAIN 1860-2000
This course surveys British political and social developments from the period of Victorian British imperialism to the era of “Swinging London” and “Cool Britannia” at the end of the 20th century. Topics include the advent of a democratic political system, the rise of the labour movement, suffragette protest, Irish nationalism, the repercussions of World Wars I and II, post-war popular culture, and the era of Thatcherism.
Lecture: Three hours a week

2720 THE LATER ROMAN EMPIRE, 284-410 AD
(See Classics 3420)

2910 INTRODUCTION TO WEST ASIA
(See Asian Studies 2010)

2920 INTRODUCTION TO EAST ASIA
(See Asian Studies 2020)

3030 POWER, CULTURE AND CONSUMPTION: THE RENAISSANCE IN ITALY
This course examines the period bounded by the Black Death and the Protestant Reformation. It explores the major political, intellectual and cultural developments in Renaissance Italy and their later translation to Northern Europe. Topics may include the place of Italy in the late medieval world; the causes and consequences of the crises of the fourteenth century; the emergence of humanism and the revival of antiquity; the relationship between culture and power; popular piety; new models of gender relations in Renaissance society; the impact of printing; and the unique shape of the Renaissance in Northern Europe. Assignments will stress primary source analysis.
PREREQUISITE: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Lecture: Three hours a week

3040 NAPOLEON AND THE LEGACY OF THE EUROPEAN ENLIGHTENMENT
This course examines the meteoric career of Napoleon Bonaparte within the larger context of the European Enlightenment. Specific topics include the French Revolution, the rise of Napoleon, the Scientific Revolution, enlightened despotism, romanticism, and nationalism.
PREREQUISITE: Second year standing or above OR permission of the instructor.
Lecture: Three hours a week

3050 MARTYRS, MARAUDERS, CLERICS AND KINGS: THE CULTURE OF THE EUROPEAN MIDDLE AGES
This course traces the history of Europe from the fall of the Roman Empire to the Black Death of the fourteenth century. Topics include the early history of Christianity and Islam, the Carolingian renaissance, the Viking invasions, the growth of the Papacy, the emergence of nation states, and the Crusades
PREREQUISITE: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

3090 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for Special Topics offered by the Department of History at the third-year level.

3100 TUDOR ENGLAND -1485-1603: CREATION OF A NATION
This course examines how the kings and queens of the Tudor dynasty transformed England from a crumbling, medieval monarchy into a powerful, centralized nation. It was a bloody process that saw thousands of English men and women lose their lives, but the result was an English nation endowed with a unique sense of identity, culture, and mission in the world. Topics include Henry VIII and the search for a legitimate heir; the Reformation in England; the evolution of queenship under Mary and Elizabeth; the ideological revolution and the problem of dissent; the changing structures of society; and the contrasting worlds of high and low culture.
PREREQUISITE: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor

3110 SCIENCE, MAGIC, WITCHCRAFT AND THE OCCULT IN PREMODERN EUROPE
This course investigates how men and women sought to understand, explain, control and manipulate the natural world in the early modern period. Topics include medieval cosmology and astrology; alchemy and learned magic; changing views of the role of the devil in the natural world; witch belief and witch hunting. Particular attention is paid to how the traditions of learned magic informed the development of science in the seventeenth century.
PREREQUISITE: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

3120 THEMES AND DEBATES IN HISTORY
This course introduces students to some of the key theories and debates within current Western historiography (the study of historical writing). History is fundamentally concerned with the analysis of evidence, yet historians often disagree over the interpretation of that evidence and what is considered causally significant. This course will consider major “schools” and concepts of historical analysis that shape how history is interpreted. Topics may include the role of ideas and individuals versus broad economic and social forces; class, gender, race, post-colonialism, post-modernism, oral history, public history, and digital history.
PREREQUISITE: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Lecture: Three hours a week

3210 HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY TO THE REFORMATION
This course examines the growth and development of Christianity prior to the Reformation. Special emphasis is placed on the relationship between the growth of the Church and the broader historical context within which it occurred.
Cross-listed with Religious Studies 3310. 
PREREQUISITES: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Lecture: Three hours a week

3220 HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY FROM THE REFORMATION TO THE PRESENT
This course examines some of the principal developments within Christianity from the Reformation until the present. Special emphasis is placed on the relationship between these developments and the broader historical context within which they occurred.
Cross-listed with Religious Studies 3320. 
PREREQUISITES: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Lecture: Three hours a week

3230 RUSSIAN HISTORY SINCE 1682
This course explores the political, social, economic, diplomatic, and cultural history of Russia since the reign of Peter the Great. It covers topics such as Russia’s rise as a European power in the 18th and 19th centuries, the development of Russian autocracy, the revolutions of 1905 and 1917, the history of the Soviet Union under Lenin and Stalin, the nationalities question, the collapse of communism, and Russia since Gorbachev.
PREREQUISITES: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Lecture: Three hours a week

3250 CANADIAN SOCIAL HISTORY TO WORLD WAR I
This course focuses on selected themes in the day-to-day lives of Canadians within their respective communities to World War I. Topics of study may include native society, pioneering, immigration and outmigration, the Victorian frame of mind, industrialization and urbanization, social and ethnic groups, attitudes and mores, working conditions, reform, the arts, and recreation.
PREREQUISITES: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Lecture: Three hours a week

3260 CANADIAN SOCIAL HISTORY SINCE WORLD WAR I
This course focuses on selected themes in the lives of Canadians within their respective communities since World War I. Topics of study may include immigration and ethnicity, industrialization and urbanization, reform, labour, health, education, welfare, crime and punishment, the arts and recreation.
PREREQUISITES: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Lecture: Three hours a week

3270 MIGRATIONS TO CANADA I
This course explores the history of Canadian migrations between the mid-18th century and the First World War. Migrant groups studied include the Loyalists of the late 18th century, African Americans, the Irish Famine, and the Central and East Europeans.
PREREQUISITES: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor

3280 MIGRATIONS TO CANADA II
This course explores the history of Canadian migrations between the First World War and the present. Some of the migrants whose histories will be highlighted are Chinese and Japanese settlers in the west during the early 20th century, Jews, Italians, peoples from the Caribbean islands, and peoples from the Middle East.
PREREQUISITES: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor

3310 HISTORY OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND— PRE-CONFEDERATION
This study of Prince Edward Island until 1864 emphasizes the French Regime, the development of colonial institutions, the struggle for the attainment of Responsible Government, and the influence of the land tenure system on the economic, political, and social development of the Island.
PREREQUISITES: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Lecture: Three hours a week

3320 HISTORY OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND—POST- CONFEDERATION
This study of Prince Edward Island from 1864 until the present emphasizes the role of the Island in the Confederation movement, its entry into Confederation, and provincial-federal adjustments as they affected Prince Edward Island’s history. It is recommended that History 331/332 be taken in sequence.
PREREQUISITES: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Lecture: Three hours a week

3330 HEALTH CARE AND NORTH AMERICAN SOCIETY IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE
This course explores the history of health, disease and medicine, focussing on North America from the time of contact between Native Peoples and Europeans, to the present. The course is organized around four major themes in the history of health and illness: historical epidemiology, social and political responses to health and disease, the rise of modern medicine and other health care groups, and the recent challenges to regular medical practice by alternative health care providers. Particular attention is paid to the effects of shifting systems of medical practice on patient experience.
PREREQUISITES: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Lecture: Three hours a week

3410 GERMAN HISTORY SINCE 1648
This course covers the political, diplomatic, social, economic, and cultural history of Germany since the Reformation. It explores topics such as the Thirty Years’ War, Austro-Prussian rivalry in the 18th century, German unification in the 19th Century, World War One, Hitler’s Third Reich, the division of Germany after 1945, and Germany since the collapse of communism.
PREREQUISITES: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Lecture: Three hours a week

3420 HISTORY OF FRANCE SINCE 1500
This course covers the political, diplomatic, social, economic, and cultural history of France since the Reformation. It explores topics such as the Wars of Religion, the Age of Louis XIV, the French Revolution, Franco-German rivalry, the Dreyfus Affair, the Presidency of Charles DeGaulle, and the student revolts of 1968.
PREREQUISITES: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Lecture: Three hours a week

3520 THE HISTORY OF QUEBEC AND FRENCH CANADA
This course examines the social, economic and political history of Quebec. It examines economic development, political change, secularization, and the rise of nationalist and separatist movements. It also explores the changing relations between Quebec and prominent French Canadian communities else- where in Canada.
PREREQUISITES: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Lecture: Three hours a week

3530 CANADA AND THE FIRST WORLD WAR
This course will examine the underlying causes of the First World War, the experiences of those who fought overseas, and the impact of war on the work and lives of those on the home front. Although the course will consider the international context of war, particular attention will be paid to the Canadian experience of the First World War, including the conscription controversy, post-war commemoration, and the legacy of the First World War for Canadian identity, politics, and culture in the twentieth century.
PREREQUISITES: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Lecture/Seminar: Three hours a week

3620 VICTORIAN BRITAIN
This course explores themes in British social, political and cultural history in the nineteenth century. The course examines the nature of the changes sweeping British society, particularly those associated with Britain’s congested cities and the urban working class. The anxieties and fears generated by these changes will constitute the focus of this course. The course challenges many popular stereotypes of the “Victorian Age” through its exploration of family life, poverty, sexuality, crime, drugs, disease and death in the Victorian city.
PREREQUISITE: Second year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Lecture/Seminar: Three hours a week

3630 MODERN IRISH HISTORY
This course examines key developments in Irish history from the eighteenth century to the present. Drawing upon scholarly articles, visual images, song, film and documentary evidence, the course explores the various struggles over land, politics and culture that have shaped the past two centuries of Irish history. Two central themes that run through the course are the contested meanings of “the Irish nation” and the uses of history in contemporary commemoration and politics. The course concludes with an inquiry into the “Troubles” in Northern Ireland and the ongoing search for peace and political stability.
PREREQUISITE: Second year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Lecture/Seminar: Three hours a week

3710 THE ATLANTIC WORLD I
This course examines the emergence of an Atlantic world through the European “discovery,” conquest, and colonization of the Americas. The interaction of West African, Western European and Aboriginal American peoples, and the societies and institutions they developed, is the focus of the course. Spanish, English, French and Portuguese activity in the Atlantic and the Americas is surveyed, with particular attention given to topics such as labour systems, religious patterns, agriculture, and the nature of colonial societies before 1700.
PREREQUISITES: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Lecture: Three hours a week

3720 THE ATLANTIC WORLD II
This course traces the emergence of a maturing Atlantic world from the latter 1600s to the period of independence. The shape and interaction of the English, French, Spanish and Portuguese and their colonial empires, together with the continuing relationship with African and Aboriginal American peoples, is the focus of study. Slavery, the plantation system, differing patterns of development, and political independence are given particular attention.
PREREQUISITES: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Lecture: Three hours a week

3730 THE SECOND WORLD WAR IN GLOBAL CONTEXT
This course combines lectures and class discussions and covers the history of the Second World War, its causes, conduct, and impact on twentieth century history. Topics include the rise of Adolf Hitler and the Nazi movement in Germany; the international crises of the 1930s; the war on land, on sea, and in the air in Europe, Africa, the Middle East, and the Far East; the Holocaust; the wartime conferences of Stalin, Churchill, and Roosevelt; the use of atomic weapons against Japan; the post-war Nuremberg Trials; the origins of the Cold War; and the impact of the war on society and the home front.
PREREQUISITES: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Lecture/Seminar: Three hours a week

3750 TOURISM AND WESTERN SOCIETY: THE TRAVEL IMPERATIVE
This course will provide an historical overview of the evolution of tourism with special emphasis on the Western world, beginning with the medieval passion for pilgrimage through the Enlightenment Grand Tour to the birth of the modern tourist trade, one of the world’s fastest growing industries. A series of case studies will be used to pursue specific topics, such as the economics of tourism, motivation for travel, the rise of the resort, the transportation revolution, promotion and imaging, the conflicted relationship between visitor and host, sustainability, and the social and cultural impacts of tourism on host societies.
PREREQUISITES: Second year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Three credit hours

3760 THE HISTORY OF GENOCIDE
This course covers the history of genocide as both a type of historical event and as a concept which has shaped international policy-making and legal practice. Topics include the Holocaust, the Ukrainian Holomodor, the Yugoslav wars of the 1990s, the “Killing Fields” of Cambodia, the Armenian and Rwandan atrocities, and the life and career of Raphael Lemkin, who coined and defined the term. The course seeks to answer the question: what is genocide and how does it differ from ordinary cruelty towards other human beings?
PREREQUISITES: Second year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Three credit hours

3780 THE MEDIEVAL BOOK
(See English 3780)

3850 WOMEN IN 19th-CENTURY CANADA
This course examines the changes that have taken place in the historical roles of women in Canadian society, and the relationship of these changes to social, economic, and intellectual developments. Using both a thematic and chronological approach, the course examines women’s roles from the beginning of the 19th Century to the achievement of suffrage in the 20th Century.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 3850.
PREREQUISITES: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Lecture/Discussion: Three hours a week

3860 WOMEN, THE LAW, AND CIVIL RIGHTS IN 20th-CENTURY CANADA
This course examines the experiences of women in 20th-Century Canadian society viewed through the prism of law and civil rights. Topics of study include the struggle for the right to vote, the Persons Case, efforts to secure equality in the workplace, the regulation of sexuality and reproduction, and the particular experiences of immigrant and Indigenous women in relation to civil rights.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 3860.
PREREQUISITES: Second year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Lecture/Discussion: Three hours a week

3910 THE UNITED STATES FROM 1900 THROUGH WORLD WAR II
This course examines developments in American society and politics from the turn of the century through World War II. The course covers such topics as Populism, Progressivism, World War I, the “roaring 20s” and the “dirty 30’s,” as well as World War II.
PREREQUISITES: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Lecture: Three hours a week

3920 THE UNITED STATES SINCE WORLD WAR II
This course examines developments in American society and politics since World War II. The course covers such topics as the Cold War, anti-Communist crusades, the evolution of the American welfare state, the civil rights movement, the war in Vietnam, and competing visions of America’s economic and political destiny.
PREREQUISITES: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Lecture: Three hours a week

3930 THE AMERICAN MIND AND IMAGINATION: FROM THE PURITANS TO THE PROGRESSIVES
This course examines the history of American thought from the Puritans to the Pragmatists. With an emphasis on religion, politics, and economics, it seeks to identify the principal forces, ideas, and traditions affecting the development of a distinctive American intellectual culture and heritage.
PREREQUISITES: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Lecture/Seminar: Three hours a week

3940 20th-CENTURY AMERICAN INTELLECTUAL HISTORY
This course examines the history of American thought in the 20th century. It emphasizes religion, politics, and economics and includes an examination of major intellects from William James to Richard Rorty. It seeks to illuminate the principal forces, ideas, and traditions affecting the development of a distinctive American intellectual culture and heritage in what has been coined “America’s Century.”
PREREQUISITES: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Lecture/Seminar: Three hours a week

3950 RACE & ETHNICITY IN AMERICAN LIFE: A HISTORY OF IMMIGRATION
The history of immigration focuses on the voluntary movement of peoples from Europe and Asia to the United States from the colonial era to the present. Topics include early settlement and migration, indentured servitude, the European origins and American destinations of the successive waves of immigrants, rural and urban immigrant life, Asian immigration, changing immigration law, and the new ethnicity. Through an examination of the immigrant experience in America, this course develops an understanding of the multiplicity and diversity of American society.
PREREQUISITES: History 2410/2420 or permission of the instructor
Lecture/Seminar: Three hours a week

3960 RACE & ETHNICITY IN AMERICAN LIFE: AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY
This course provides an introduction to African-American history. Beginning with the introduction of slavery into the American colonies, it examines the journey from slavery to freedom, the limits to freedom, and the persistent struggle for civil rights in American society.
PREREQUISITES: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Lecture/Seminar: Three hours a week

3970 RACE & ETHNICITY IN AMERICAN LIFE: THE HISPANIC-AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
This course provides an introduction to Hispanic-American history. Beginning with the Spanish conquest, this course examines the struggle for independence, the American conquest, and the evolution of Chicano culture and La Raza as aspects of the persistent struggle for civil rights in America.
PREREQUISITES: Second Year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Lecture/Seminar: Three hours a week

4040 “MONSTERS, GOLD, AND GLORY”: TRAVEL, TRADE, AND THE PROBLEM OF DISCOVERY IN PREMODERN EUROPE
This advanced seminar examines European interaction with Asia and Africa from the time of Alexander the Great and the Ancient Greeks up to the formation of the large trading companies in the early 17th century, when Europeans understood the lands of the far east and south to be inhabited by strange semi-human peoples and the earth filled with gold and precious stones. This course examines the sources and evolution of this lore, noting how it affected the way explorers and merchant adventurers of the 16th century understood the world and interacted with the peoples they encountered. Topics include the development of the Greek and Roman world view; Europe’s experience with barbarism; the Pax Mongolica and the development of the medieval world system; medieval geography; the cartographic revolution; explanations of difference and the emergence of race; cross-cultural exchange; and hybridity.
PREREQUISITES: Third year standing or above, or permission of the instructor

4050 CRUSADES AND CRUSADING
This advanced seminar course examines the crusading movement of the High Middle Ages from both the Christian and Islamic perspective. Topics may include: the Reconquista; Urban II and the development of early crusading theory; Abbasid-Fatimid relations; the evolution of Christian notions of knighthood and the rise of the military orders; the development and application of Christian and Islamic notions of holy war; Crusading against Christians; the logistics of crusading; Christian-Muslim interaction in the Levant; and the counter-crusade under Salah al-Din and Sultan Baybars. Students will be expected to read and engage with a diverse assortment of primary sources, taken from both Christian and Islamic contexts.
PREREQUISITES: Third year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

4090 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for Special Topics offered by the Department of History at the fourth year level.

4110 EUROPE SINCE BISMARCK
This seminar course covers the social, political, economic, cultural, military, and diplomatic history of twentieth-century Europe from the age of nationalism in the late nineteenth century to the post-Cold War era of ethnic conflict and economic integration. Topics include imperialism, nationalism, World Wars One and Two, Nazism, decolonization, the Cold War, the European Union, the rise and fall of communism, the Balkan wars of the 1990s, globalization, and the rise of the New Right. Using a comparative perspective, the course examines what forces have united and divided Europe’s nations since the end of the nineteenth century.
PREREQUISITES: Third year standing or above, or permission of the instructor

4150 CANADA APOLOGIZES: STUDIES IN HISTORICAL APOLOGIES
This course considers the phenomenon of the historical apology in the modern Canadian context. Students are introduced to a collection of historical events for which governments and churches have since offered official apologies for their participation. Case studies include: the imposition of the Chinese Head Tax, the denials of entries to the Komagata Maru and the S. S. St. Louis, the internment of the Japanese during World War II, the institutionalization of the Duplessis Orphans, the operation of Indian Residential Schools, the relocation of the Inuit, and the relocation of Africville. This course poses these questions: is it possible to right the wrongs of the past, and to what extent do past wrongs belong to us.
PREREQUISITES: Third year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Three credit hours

4240 HISTORY OF CANADIAN NATIONALISM AND THE CANADIAN IDENTITY
This seminar course examines the development of Canadian nationalist thought and the evolution of the Canadian identity. Topics to be examined may include the evolution of national symbols, such as the Mountie, hockey, and the canoe, and their roles in the process of Canadian nation building and identity formation. The course also examines the influence of the United States and Great Britain in shaping Canadian identity, and the promotion of a distinctive Canadian culture through a variety of media ranging from tourism pamphlets to the CBC.
PREREQUISITES: Third year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

4250 CHILDHOOD IN MODERN CANADA
This is a seminar course in 19th- and 20th- Century Canadian social history which takes the experiences of children as its central focus. Themes of study may include the rise and decline of child labour, the development of education and child welfare systems, and changing ideas about childhood and the family.
PREREQUISITES: Third year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

4260 A HISTORY OF THE CANADIAN WORKING CLASSES
From fur trader, to factory hand, to fast-food worker, this seminar course explores the historical experiences of working men, women and children in Canada. Topics of study may include early forms of labour, such as slavery; the industrial revolution and its effects on working class families; the growth of scientific management in the workplace; and the dislocations posed by the Great Depression and the growth of industrial legality. Working class culture, organization and resistance are considered, as are certain ideas about workers, such as the respectable worker and the “breadwinner.”
PREREQUISITES: Third year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

4320 BRITAIN AND THE IMPERIAL EXPERIENCE
This advanced seminar course examines Britain’s experience of empire and imperialism from its days as a colony of the Roman Empire up to and including decolonisation in the twentieth century. Through a series of case studies and cross-cultural and trans-regional thematic comparisons, this course will introduce students to some of the main issues underlying the study of empire, colonialism and the relationship between coloniser and colonised in the British Empire. Topics may include: the ambiguous legacy of Rome; Wales, England’s first colonial experience; Ireland and the early pattern of imperialism; England and the Moghul Empire; England and the Caribbean; the rhetoric of Empire; Britain’s involvement in the scramble for Africa; the emergence of racial theory; the tools of imperialism; culture and imperialism; colonial resistance; decolonisation in South Asia and southern Africa; the post-colonial empire.
PREREQUISITES: Third year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

4340 MADNESS AND SOCIETY
This course examines the history of madness in comparative context from the beginning of the eighteenth century to the present with a focus on Europe and North America. Topics include major historical developments in the understanding of madness such as traditional responses to unsoundness of mind, the development of asylums, the rise of professional psychiatry, scientific models of mental illness, and the community care movement. Pivotal theorists, including Freud, Kraepelin, Foucault, and Szasz are discussed.
PREREQUISITES: Third year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Lecture: Three hours a week

4410 UNITED STATES FOREIGN POLICY FROM THE REVOLUTIONARY PERIOD THROUGH WORLD WAR I
This course examines the evolution of American foreign policy from the American Revolution through World War I. Topics include neutrality, the changing role of the United States in foreign relations, the interaction between domestic and foreign policy, American expansionism, and political, economic, and cultural relationships between the United States and other countries and peoples.
PREREQUISITES: Third year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

4420 UNITED STATES FOREIGN POLICY SINCE WORLD WAR I
This course examines the evolution of American foreign policy from World War I through the end of the Cold War. Topics include the interwar years, the origins of World War II, post- war American hegemony, the Cold War, the New World Order, and political, economic, and cultural interaction between the United States and other countries and peoples.
PREREQUISITES: Third year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

4550 WAR AND REVOLUTION IN THE 20th CENTURY WORLD
This course examines the history of the world since the First World War. It explores crucial events such as the First and Second World Wars; communist revolution in countries such as Russia, China, Cambodia and Cuba; decolonization; the Korean conflict; war in southeast Asia; the Cold War; the collapse of communism in eastern Europe; and the Persian Gulf War. It also focuses on pivotal figures such as Lenin, Churchill, Hitler, Mao, Thatcher, De Gaulle, Gorbachev, and Castro.
PREREQUISITES: Third year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

4610 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT I
(See Economics 3110)

4620 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT II
(See Economics 3120)

4720 BRITAIN IN THE 20th CENTURY: SOCIETY, CULTURE AND IDENTITY
This course explores the construction of British national identities in the twentieth century, in particular how issues of class, gender, race and nationalism have been represented in popular culture. Topics may include the social impacts of World War I, the experience of the Depression era, British Fascist movements, the Blitz, post-war austerity, youth culture, multi-racial Britain, and football violence. Course materials include journalism of the period, film footage, oral history, diaries, pop music and contemporary cinema.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 4740
PREREQUISITE: Third year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

4730 THE RISE OF CONSUMER SOCIETY: BRITISH SOCIETY IN THE 18TH CENTURY
This course examines the social and cultural changes brought about by the birth of a consumer society in 18th-century Britain. Topics include the rise of commercial society and consumerism, new techniques in marketing and advertising, the debate over fashion and luxury, the emergence of the public sphere of the coffeehouse, the commercialization of theatre and the art market, and the relationship between commerce, crime and punishment.
PREREQUISITE: Third year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

4830 THE HISTORY OF THE ENVIRONMENTALIST MOVEMENT
This seminar course covers the history of the environmentalist movement in the United States and Canada since its origins in the late nineteenth century. It describes the changes the movement has undergone thanks to its links to the conservation, eugenics, ecology, birth control, and population control movements. The course also focuses on the writings of key figures in the environmentalist movement, such as Paul Ehrlich, Barry Commoner, Rachel Carson, David Suzuki, and Bill McKibben, as well as the activities of organizations such as the Sierra Club, Zero Population Growth, and Earth First. Students seek to understand the nature of today’s environmentalism as a political, social, and cultural movement by examining what it has meant to earlier generations.
PREREQUISITE: Third year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

4840 APPLIED PUBLIC HISTORY
This course introduces students to both the field of public history and the application of history and historical methods in a variety of workplace settings. Public history, which involves the practice and presentation of history outside the academic setting, is the domain of a wide variety of practitioners. While the course deals primarily with the North American context, it also addresses questions of ethics, standards, and audience of broader interest to students of history.
PREREQUISITE: Third or fourth year standing in a history major or honours program, as well as permission of the department
Seminar/field work: Three hours a week and eight hours per week of unpaid field work in a public history workplace setting, supervised by a qualified professional acting as a mentor.
Semester hours of credit: 6

4850 THE IDEAS THAT CHANGED MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY
This course covers the history of European ideas since the French Revolution and focuses on the main political ideologies that have arisen over the last two centuries. Topics include conservatism, liberalism, socialism, feminism, imperialism, nationalism, Soviet communism, and environmentalism. The course seeks to determine the fate of these ideologies as the twenty-first century unfolds.
Cross-listed with Political Science 4360.
PREREQUISITES: Third year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

4890 20th CENTURY PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND
This course examines major economic, political, and cultural developments within Prince Edward Island during the 20th century. Topics include the effects of technological change; Maritime Union; federal-provincial relations, including transfer payments and the 15-year Comprehensive Development Plan; “Rural Renaissance”; the constitutional discussions of the 1980s and 1990s; and the debate surrounding construction of the “fixed link.”
PREREQUISITES: Third year standing or above, or permission of the instructor
Seminar: Three hours a week

4910-4920 DIRECTED STUDIES
These tutorial courses are intended to encourage independent initiative and study on the part of the student. Reading and research are conducted within specialized areas chosen by the student in close consultation with one or more members of the Department. This course is restricted to qualified Third and Fourth Year students in any discipline.

Canadian
The possible areas of study are:

The History of Canadian Native Peoples
Western Canadian History Canadian Social History Canadian Women’s History
Folk History of Prince Edward Island
PEI Social and Cultural
Atlantic Region Social and Cultural

American:

U.S. Foreign Policy, 20th-Century
18th-, 19th-, and 20th-Century America
Canadian-American Relations
Colonial Societies

British and European:

British History
British Social and Cultural History
Western and Central Europe
European, Medieval, Modern, and Intellectual History Early Modern Europe—Social and Cultural History Gender in British and European History
History of Religion

(See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies).

4930 DIRECTED STUDIES (CLASSICS)
(See Classics 4310 (with approval of History Chair))

4940 DIRECTED STUDIES (CLASSICS)
(See Classics 4320 (with approval of History Chair))

HONOURS COURSES
These courses are restricted to students registered in the History Honours Program. For regulations see above.

4970 HONOURS TUTORIAL IN HISTORIOGRAPHY
This is an intensive reading and tutorial course in selected fields offered by the Department. Students should consult with the honours advisor in planning this course. The course normally centres on the historiography of the broad area in which the student’s graduating essay is prepared.
Tutorial: Three hours a week

4980 HONOURS GRADUATING ESSAY
Students propose, research, and write a major research essay under the supervision of a tutor from the Department. The essay is the subject of a final oral examination. The oral examination committee consists of the major tutor, one additional member from the Department of History, and a faculty member from another Department of the University.
Tutorial: Three semester hours of credit

Integrated Studies

Coordinator:  Inge Dorsey

The Bachelor of Integrated Studies (BIS) program is a 90-credit degree designed to accommodate the personal, educational, and career goals of adult students, most of whom already possess diverse learning and who study part-time.

The structure is flexible while ensuring that students receive both depth and breadth of knowledge within their studies. The student achieves depth through choosing a concentration of at least 8 courses in an area of interest. Breadth comes through the completion of a required and recommended core of basic courses ranging from literature and communication skills to philosophy and leadership, and by pursuing a diversity of offerings to satisfy personal intellectual curiosity.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

AREA OF CONCENTRATION (24 semester-hours)
Students must complete an area of concentration totalling 8 courses or 24 semester-hours. One course at the 3000 level and one course at the 4000 level. A further 8 courses at the senior (3000 and 4000) level are required for graduation. Not more than 12 courses or 36 semester-hours can be at the introductory (1000) level. Several additional courses are recommended, depending on individual learning plans. At least 30 semester-hours must be at the 3000 level or above, with a grade of 65% in at least 7 of the 10 courses completed at the senior level.

REQUIRED COURSES (9 semester-hours)
One of UPEI 1010, 1020, or 1030 and a writing intensive course
Integrated Studies 1930: Creating a Career and Learning Portfolio

ELECTIVES
Students are required to explain and reflect on their course choices when they establish their learning plan. However, the need to ensure coherence in study should not restrict students from intellectual exploration, or from addressing conspicuous gaps in knowledge unrelated to their primary learning objectives. One of the primary roles of the BIS Coordinator is to help ensure that the course choices are balanced, and the overall outcomes of a well-rounded degree program are achieved.

A number of courses are identified as forming the foundation of a university career. These are recommended rather than required to allow flexibility in devising learning plans with students. Academic advisors give priority to these courses.

SUMMARY
The Bachelor of Integrated Studies requirements include:

  • 33 semester-hours (11 courses) at the senior level: nine 3000-4000 level courses in any subject, one 3000 level course in the concentration, and one 4000 level course in the concentration.
  • A grade of 65% in at least 7 of the 11 courses completed at this senior level
  • Not more than 36 semester-hours (12 courses) at the preparatory (1000) level
  • 6 semester-hours in One of UPEI 1010, UPEI 1020, or UPEI 1030 and a writing intensive course
  • Integrated Studies 1930: Creating a Career and Learning Portfolio

PLAR PROCESSES IN THE BIS
Program PLAR at the University of Prince Edward Island provides for assessment and recognition of prior learning (PLAR) through portfolio assessment. Learners must demonstrate equivalency of their learning from sources other than formal study to the outcomes expected of a student who is completing the degree through course work. For more information on the role of PLAR, contact the BIS Coordinator.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Students may choose from a broad range of courses, according to their area of concentration and with academic advice.

1930 CAREER AND LEARNING PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT
This course is designed to review and clarify a student’s learning and career objectives, and to document and demonstrate experiential learning. Learners understand the various purposes of portfolios; know the conventions of developing and professionally presenting a portfolio; and are capable of articulating acquired learning in job descriptions or degree requirements.
Cross-listed with Education (cf. Education 3190) and University (cf. University 1930)
Three semester hours

International Studies

Co-ordinator
Wimal Rankaduwa, Economics

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
Students wishing to minor in International Studies must complete twenty-one semester hours according to the program described below. All courses are valued at three semester hours.
There are two mandatory courses in the International Studies program:

INT 2010 – Introduction to International Development Studies
POLS 2820 – Introduction to International Politics

Notes:
All other courses taken to fulfill an International Studies minor should come from the list of elective courses indicated below; any exception must receive the permission of the program coordinator.
No more than two International Studies cross-listed courses (not counting the two core courses noted above) can be fulfilled with courses taken from any one department or program listed below.  At least 3 of the 7 courses required for the minor must be taken at the 3000 or 4000 level.

It is strongly recommended that students endeavour to gain proficiency in a second language.Recommended language courses:
FR 2520 Le Français Des Affaires
FR 4460 Traduction: Anglais—Français
FR 4470 Traduction: Français—Anglais
SPAN 1010-1020: Spanish
SPAN 2030 Intensive Study Abroad (Salamanca)

Whenever circumstances warrant it, the Modern Languages Department offers courses in languages other than French, German or Spanish. In the past introductory courses have been offered in Chinese, Irish, Italian, Japanese, Russian, Mi’kmaq and Scottish Gaelic. For Japanese or other Asian languages see Asian Studies.

1010 Introduction to [A Selected Modern Language] I
1020 Introduction to [A Selected Modern Language] II

Asian Studies
AST 2010: Introduction to West Asia
AST 2020: Introduction to East Asia

Business
BUS 2870: Introduction to International Business BUS 4770: International Marketing

Economics
EC 3310: International Trade
EC 3320: International Monetary Economics
EC 3410: Economic Development Theory
EC 3420: Economic Development Policy

English
ENG 3010 – The New English Literatures of Africa and the Caribbean
ENG 3020 – The New English Literatures of Australia, New Zealand, and the Indian Subcontinent

Environmental Studies
ENV 3420 Environment and Development
ENV 4410 Environment and International Relations

History
HIST 1140 Plague: Historical Themes
HIST 2150 Foreign Foods: Eating in the Age of Empires
HIST 3280 Migrations To Canada II
HIST 3760 The History of Genocide
HIST 4150 Canada Apologizes: Studies In Historical Apologies
HIST 4320 Britain and the Imperial Experience
HIST 4420 United States Foreign Policy Since World War I
HIST 4550 War and Revolution in the 20th Century World

International Studies
INT 2020 International Development Problems and Policies
INT 2090 Special Topics in International Development Studies
INT 3090 Special Topics in International Development Studies
INT 4090 Special Topics in International Development Studies
INT 4210-4220 Directed Studies in International Development Studies

Island Studies
IST 2010: Introduction to Island Studies
IST 2110: Island Toruism: The Search for Paradise

Modern Languages
FR 2520: Le Français Des Affaires
FR 4460: Traduction: Anglais—Français
FR 4470: Traduction: Français—Anglais
SPAN 2010-2020: Intermediate Spanish
SPAN 2030: Intensive Study Abroad (Salamanca)
SPAN 2110: Latin American Studies: South America
SPAN 2120: Latin American Studies: Mexico and the Caribbean

Music
MUS 1230: Introduction to Music and Culture
MUS 1240 :Perspectives in Music and Culture I
MUS 2020: Explorations in Music
MUS 2230: Perspectives in Music and Culture II

Political Science
POLS 2210: Political Economy and Social Change in the Developing World
POLS 2310: War and Peace
POLS 2820: Introduction to International Politics
POLS 3430: Comparative Politics of South Asia
POLS 3610: Comparative Politics of Africa
POLS 3620: Comparative Politics of Latin America and the Caribbean
POLS 3630: Comparative Politics of the Middle East
POLS 3710: Political Transition in Central and Eastern Europe
POLS 3720: The Politics of Russia and Its Borderlands
POLS 3930: International Theory
POLS 4350: The Globalization Debate
POLS 4710: International Organizations
POLS 4720: International Law
POLS 4750: International Human Rights

Religious Studies
RS 1050: World Religions
RS 2210: Buddhism East and West
RS 2420: Hinduism
RS 2430: Judaism
RS 2440: Islam
RS 2510: Japanese Religion and Culture
RS 2610: Chinese Religion and Philosophy
RS 2790: Catholicism, Christian Unity, and World Religions
RS 3220: Religious Ethics East and West
RS 3230: Interreligious Dialogue
RS 3520: Mysticism In Buddhism and Christianity

Sociology/Anthropology
SAN 2120: Peoples of South Asia
SAN 2420: Peoples of Oceania
SAN 2510: Peoples of Africa
SAN 3030: International Migration, Transnationalism, and the Canadian Mosaic
SAN 3550: Globalization
ANTH 4010: Medical Anthropology
ANTH 4040 :Applied and Public Interest Anthropology
SAN 4420: Social and Cultural Change

Special topics courses (usually designated by a 2090 or 3090 course number) may be counted towards the International Studies minor. Likewise, courses taken during an international exchange program may be permitted. Check with the program director concerning course eligibility.

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES COURSES

2010 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT STUDIES
This course examines important theoretical and empirical issues of international development using an interdisciplinary approach. The course focuses on a critical analysis of comparative development experience of developing and developed countries, various theories, policy alternatives and strategies of development, and the role of national and international organizations in international development.

2020 INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROBLEMS AND POLICIES
This course examines a set of important international development problems and policies theoretically and empirically using an interdisciplinary approach. The course focuses on a critical analysis of the experience of developing and developed countries in relation to the problems of poverty and income distribution, agricultural and rural development, the environment, education, health, gender, population, migration, international trade and finance, international debt and foreign aid, and multinationals and foreign direct investment. A variety of policy alternatives and strategies suggested as solutions for these problems, and the role of national and international organizations in the application of those policies and strategies are also examined.
Three semester hours

2090 SPECIAL TOPICS
To create a category for Special Topics in INT (International Studies)

3090 SPECIAL TOPICS
To create a category for Special Topics in INT (International Studies)

4090 SPECIAL TOPICS
To create a category for Special Topics in INT (International Studies)

4210-4220 DIRECTED STUDIES

Island Studies

http://www.upei.ca/arts/island-studies

Co-ordinator
James Randall

Island Studies is an interdisciplinary program designed to promote an understanding of selected features of the world’s small islands, including their geographies, ecologies, cultures, political systems, histories, and societies.

The Island Studies program has three primary goals:
first, to engage students in an emerging, international academic discussion of islands’ distinctive characteristics, challenges, and opportunities;
second, to study Prince Edward Island as a specific example of an island bearing these characteristics and playing out these challenges and opportunities; and
third to study islands in a comparative and international framework.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN ISLAND STUDIES
A minor in Island Studies consists of twenty-one (21) semester hours of credit taken from the list of approved courses, and including Island Studies 2010. Among the elective courses, students must complete at least two courses (six semester hours) specific to Prince Edward Island and at least two courses (six semester hours) which are comparative. Students intending to complete a minor in Island Studies are encouraged to complete Island Studies 2010 early in their course of studies. Students minoring in Island Studies must choose at least 4 courses in subject areas other than those in which they are majoring.

ISLAND STUDIES CORE COURSES

2010 INTRODUCTION TO ISLAND STUDIES
This course introduces students to the emerging interdisciplinary and comparative study of islands and archipelagoes. It examines their cultures, geography, economies, historical development, environmental concerns, and systems of governance. It focuses on jurisdictions with varying degrees of self-government such as Barbados, the Faroe Islands, Iceland, the Isle of Man, Malta, and Prince Edward Island.

2090 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Island Studies at the 2000 level.

2110 ISLAND TOURISM: THE SEARCH FOR PARADISE
This course will provide a cross-disciplinary analysis of the nature of island tourism, looking at contrasts between warm-water and cold-water islands; supply and demand considerations; cycles and challenges of the industry; the cultural positioning of hosts and guests; the transformation of land and seascapes; pros and cons of mass versus niche tourism; environmental downsides; and future challenges, including prospects for ‘sustainable development’.
Cross-listed with Sociology/Anthropology 2110

2910 DIRECTED STUDIES
This course provides an opportunity for students to study a current topic relevant to islands, under the supervision of a faculty member. Alternatively, credit for this course may be claimed by fulfilling an overseas assignment with a recognized volunteer-sending agency (e.g., CUSO) on a small island in the developing world.
Three hours per week

3090 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Island Studies at the 3000 level.

3740 TOURISM
(See Sociology/Anthropology 3740)
PREREQUISITE: Island Studies 2010

4090 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Island Studies at the 4000 level.

4910-4920 DIRECTED STUDIES
In response to individual student needs, Directed Studies courses will be designed in the areas of directed readings or directed research. In addition, “Special topics” courses will be offered from time to time by members of the faculty or visiting instructors.

ELECTIVES
Prince Edward Island Courses:
Biology 2220 – General Ecology
Biology 3270 – Field Coastal Ecology
Biology 3910 – Marine Biology
Economics 2420 – The Economics of Tourism
English 3310 – Literature of Atlantic Canada
Environmental Studies 1010 – Introduction to Environmental Studies
Environmental Studies 2310- Island Environmental Histories
History 3310 – History of PEI – Pre-Confederation
History 3320 – History of PEI – Post Confederation
History 4890 – 20th Century PEI
Modern Languages 4430 – Culture et litterateur Acadiennes I
Philosophy 3710 – Community-based Inquiry in Agriculture and Globalization
Political Science 2020 – The Politics and Government of Prince Edward Island

Comparative Courses:
Acadian Studies 2010 – Introduction to Acadian Studies
Anthropology 3320- Knowledge and Culture
Biology 4520 – Biogeography and Macroecology
Business 3730 – Tourism Management
Business 4550 – Sustainable Tourism Development
Economics 2120 – Regional Economics
Economics 3310 – International Trade
Economics 3410 – Economic Development Theory
Education 4630 – Culture and Society in Education
English 3420 – Fiction from Ireland
Environmental Studies 3340 – Environmental Stresses on Island Communities
Environmental Studies 4110 – Environmental Governance and International Relations
History 2310-2320 – The Atlantic Region
Latin American Studies 2120 – Mexico and the Caribbean
Philosophy 2030 – Environmental Philosophy
Political Science 2820 – Introduction to International Politics
Political Science 2330 – Political Geography
Political Science 3620 – Comparative Politics of Latin America and the Caribbean
Political Science 4140 – Public Policy in small Island Jurisdictions
Political Science 4450 – Political Economy of East and Southeast Asia
Sociology/Anthropology 2420 – Peoples of Oceania
Sociology/Anthropology 3740 – Tourism

NOTE 1
Other courses not specifically focused on islands may, with prior approval of the instructor, the Co-ordinator of Island Studies, and the Dean of Arts, be credited toward an Island Studies minor. In such a case, the students will complete substantial individual work on topics related to islands.

NOTE 2
Students minoring in Island Studies must choose at least 4 courses in subject areas other than those in which they are majoring.

NOTE 3
Students who have taken ENV 4110 for credit cannot take IST 6190 for credit.

Bachelor of Applied Arts in Journalism

Coordinating Committee
Donald Desserud, Coordinator – Arts
Wendy Shilton – Arts
Geoff Lindsay – Arts
Greg Doran – Arts
Anne Furlong – Arts

The Bachelor of Applied Arts in Journalism is an articulated degree offered by the University of Prince Edward Island in cooperation with Holland College. Students acquire technical training and practical experience in Journalism (primarily during study at Holland College) and also acquire breadth of knowledge, content exposure, and skills in research, problem-solving, and critical thinking associated with a liberal arts education (primarily during study at UPEI).

Students normally undertake one year of study at the University, then complete the two-year Journalism program at Holland College (earning a Holland College diploma), before undertaking a final year of study at the University. The final year of study normally includes an opportunity for journalistic writing either at the University or arranged through Holland College. Deviations from the normal sequence of study between the University and Holland College are permitted. In such cases, at least five courses (15 semester-hours) of study must be completed after the Holland College diploma is earned.

Note: applicants will be placed into the General Journalism specialization until they declare another specialization.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Students complete 20 courses (60 semester hours) at the University. The program is designed to ensure breadth of exposure to areas of knowledge important to journalistic practice. All students will be required to complete a minimum of 6 (18 semester hours) 3000/4000 level courses.

The 20 courses must include:

1) UPEI 1020
2) ENG 1010 (UPEI 1010)
3) JOUR 1010
4) ENG 3810
5) ONE of: ANY MATH, PSY 2510, 2710
6) WRIT 4040
7) ANY C ST or DSJS course

IN ADDITION to completing the common core courses, students must choose one of the following specializations upon which to focus:
I. General Journalism
II. Law and Politics
III. International Affairs
IV. Business and Economics
V. Environment and Health
VI. Science and Technology
VII. Arts and Entertainment

The courses required to complete these specializations are as follows:

I. General Journalism:
ONE of: BIO 1010, CHEM 1110, PHYS 1110
ONE of: HIST 1010 or 1020
ONE of: POLS 2010 or 2620
ONE of: PHIL 1020 or 2020
ONE of: HIST 3310, 3320, IS 2010
ANY course in: Anthropology, Sociology, Sociology/Anthropology, Asian Studies
One Economics course at the 1000 level
ANY course in English, Modern Languages or Fine Arts
ANY FIVE electives

II. Law and Politics:
P ST 2010 or 2020
HIST 1010 or 1020
THREE of POLS: 2110, 2120, 3110, 3140, 4010 or 4020
TWO of: DSJS 3060, 4040, ENG 2260, PHIL 2020, 2040, 2060, 2510, SOC 1010, 1020, 1050, ANTH 1050, 1070
TWO of: BUS 3010,3020, DSJS 3020, PHIL 3030, 3510, 4270
POLS 4320 or PHIL 3530
ANY Modern Language
ANY TWO electives

III. International Affairs:
TWO of: POLS 2210, 2220, 2310, 2330, 2820
ONE of: IDS 2010, 2020, PHIL 2070
TWO of: POLS 3150, 3530, 3900, 3910, 4710, 4830
ONE of: POLS 3510, 3520, 3540, 4350, 4410, 4420, 4820
ONE of: POLS 3610, 3620, 3630, 3710, 3720, 4220, 4810
ONE of: POLS 3920, 3930, 4450, 4510, 4720, 4750, EC 3310, 3320, 3410, 3420
TWO courses in a Modern Language
ONE of: POLS 4320 or PHIL 3530
ANY TWO electives

IV. Business and Economics:
EC 1010EC 1020
ONE of EC 2030 or 2040
TWO other EC courses, 2000 level or above
BUS 1010
BUS 1710
BUS 2410
BUS 2650
ACCT 1010
ONE of PHIL 1020, 1050, 1110, 2020, 2210 or 3530
ANY TWO electives

V. Environment and Health:
BIO 1010
ONE of ENV 2020 or BIO 1020
ANY THREE other ENV courses
TWO of: PS 2010, 2020, 2620, PHIL 1050, 2040, 2060, HIST 1010, 1020, IS 2010, EC 1010, FN 1010, PSY 2220
TWO Science courses or ONE Science course AND PSY 3330
ONE of EC 2150, HIST 2220, PHIL 2030, 3010 or 3530
ANY TWO electives

VI. Science and Technology:
BIO 1010
CHEM 1110 and CHEM 1120
PHYS 1210 and PHYS 1220C SC 1510 and C SC 1520
ANY TWO of PHIL 2030, 2040, PHIL 3010, PHIL 3630, ENG 2240, HIST 2220, 4340, HIST 3110, 3330, DSJS 4120
ANY TWO Science courses
ANY TWO electives

VII. Arts and Entertainment:
ENG 1950T ST 2440T ST 3440
TWO of: MUS 1230, 1240, 2010, 2020
THREE of: FAH 1010, 1020, ENG 2220, 3030, 3040, DSJS 3110
BUS 1010 or 1710
PHIL 2140 or 3530
ONE of IT 1320, ENG 3140, 3150, 3410
ANY TWO electives

COURSES:

1010 INTRODUCTION TO JOURNALISM AND MEDIA STUDIES
This course introduces students to the key concepts in media studies. The economic, social, political, and cultural contexts of modern media will be examined and analyzed. It will also consider the relationship between power, information and identity. Finally, this course will provide students with practical skills in news reporting, using the experiential learning model.
3 credit hours

3010 THE LONG FORM
The Long Form provides students with the opportunity to improve their reporting skills and to broaden their perspective by taking the long view of contemporary issues and events. In addition to developing their expertise with enterprise journalism, narrative journalism, and documentary storytelling, students will complete a final project that reflects best practices in the long form.
PREREQUISITE:  Journalism 1010, English 1010, or permission of the instructor
3 credit hours

School of Mathematical & Computational Sciences

http://upei.ca/mathcompsci

Mathematics and Computational Sciences Faculty
Shannon Fitzpatrick, Professor, Interim Associate Dean
Louis Doiron, Professor, Director of Actuarial Science and Financial Mathematics
Maxim Burke, Professor
Cezar Câmpeanu, Professor
Gordon MacDonald, Professor
Nasser Saad, Professor
Ken Sulston, Professor
David Horrocks, Associate Professor
Shafiqul Islam, Associate Professor
Sami Khedhiri, Associate Professor
David LeBlanc, Associate Professor
Michael McIsaac, Associate Professor
Christopher Power, Associate Professor
Yingwei Wang, Associate Professor
Alexander Alvarez, Assistant Professor
Antonio Bolufe-Rohler, Assistant Professor
Andrew Godbout, Assistant Professor
Kai Liu, Assistant Professor
Jay Adamsson, Adjunct Professor
Qiang Ye, Adjunct Professor

The School of Mathematical and Computational Sciences at UPEI provides students with a strong foundation in Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science, and offers a comprehensive suite of applied programs which meet market demand and lead to fulfilling careers in areas such as: Financial Mathematics, Actuarial Science, Data Analytics, Business Analytics and Video Game Programming.

Faculty members in the School of Mathematical and Computational Sciences are focused on providing quality instruction in a friendly learning community. Small class sizes, active-learning opportunities and accessible professors are features of all programs in the School of Mathematical and Computational Sciences.


The School of Mathematical and Computational Sciences offers degrees in:

Mathematics Major and Honours
Statistics Major and Honours
Computer Science Major and Honours
Computer Science Major, specializing in Video Game Programming
Actuarial Science Major
Financial Mathematics Major
Analytics Major, specializing in Data Analytics
Analytics Major, specializing in Business Analytics
Mathematics with Engineering Major

Mathematics
Mathematics is the study of number, quantity and space. Mathematics can be studied for its own sake (usually called pure mathematics) or as it is applied to other disciplines. The Bachelor of Science with a Major in Mathematics provides students with a solid foundation in both pure and applied mathematics, without any particular applied specialization. Graduates of this program are well situated for graduate programs in Mathematics, post-Bachelor professional programs (Education, Law, Medicine, Business, etc.), or applied Mathematical Sciences programs. Students interested in continuing on to work in mathematics research should consider the Bachelor of Science with Honours in Mathematics.

Statistics
Statistics is the practice of collecting and analyzing numerical data, and inferring properties of the whole from a representative sample. The Bachelor of Science with a Major in Statistics provides students with the solid foundation in both statistical theory and applied statistics necessary to become a Statistician or to proceed to more specialized Statistical study at the graduate level. Students interested in continuing to work in statistics research should consider the Bachelor of Science with Honours in Statistics.

Computer Science
Computer Science is the practice of understanding, designing, and automating algorithmic processes. The Bachelor of Science with a Major in Computer Science provides students with a solid foundation in both the principles and practice of computing. Graduates of this program are well situated for graduate programs in Computer Science or entering the workforce. Students interested in continuing on to work in computer Science research should consider the Bachelor of Science with Honours in Computer Science.

Actuarial Science
Actuarial Science is the study of risk, usually risk associated with insurance, pension and investment plans. Actuarial Science uses techniques from mathematics, statistics and finance. The Bachelor of Science with a Major in Actuarial Science provides students with the education required to become an Actuary.

Financial Mathematics
Financial Mathematics is the application of mathematical models to finance, usually to analyze markets and pricing. Financial Mathematics uses techniques from Mathematics, Statistics, Business and Economics. The Bachelor of Science in Financial Mathematics provides a solid foundation in Financial Mathematics, leading either to a career in the financial sector or to further training in advanced Financial Mathematics.

Analytics
Analytics is the application of techniques from Mathematical and Computational Sciences to discover meaningful patterns in data. The Bachelor of Science in Analytics has two specializations: Business Analytics, which focuses particularly on business data, and using analytics to improve business performance, and Data Analytics, which focuses on the examining large amounts of raw for the purpose of drawing conclusions about that information.

Computer Science specializing in Video Game Programming
Video Game Programming involves mathematical and problem solving skills in addition to programming and design of video games on traditional and non-traditional platforms. The Bachelor of Science in Computer Science with a specialization in Video Game Programming provides students with the specialized skills to enter this growing field.

Mathematics with Engineering
The School of Mathematical and Computational Sciences offers the opportunity to obtain a Mathematics degree in conjunction with Engineering courses offered through UPEI’s School of Sustainable Design Engineering. The Bachelor of Science in Mathematics with Engineering provides a foundational Engineering program combined with more advanced mathematical training than is received in an Engineering Degree program.

Course code prefixes
In the School of Mathematical and Computational Sciences, there are five course prefixes:
MATH – for Mathematics courses
STAT – for Statistics courses
CS – for Computer Science courses
AMS – for Applied Mathematical Sciences courses (mainly Actuarial Science and Financial Mathematics)
MCS – for common or interdisciplinary courses in Mathematical and Computational Science

COMMON REQUIREMENTS ACROSS ALL DEGREE PROGRAMS IN THE SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICAL AND COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCES

COMMON CORE
All degree programs in the School of Mathematical and Computational Sciences are built on a common core of courses that should be completed in the first two years of study. This common core consists of the following courses:

Credits
MATH 1910 Single Variable Calculus I 4
MATH 1920 Single Variable Calculus II 4
MATH 2610 Linear Algebra I 3
STAT 1910 Introduction to Probability and Statistics 3
CS 1910 Computer Science I 3
CS 1920 Computer Science II 3
One of… UPEI 1010 Writing Studies;
UPEI 1020 Inquiry Studies;
UPEI 1030 University Studies
3
Total Semester Hours of Credit 23

ADVANCED COMMON CORE COURSES

Students in all degree programs in the School of Mathematical and Computational Sciences must complete:

Credits
MCS 4210 Professional Communication and Practice (writing-intensive) 3
MCS 3050 Tutoring in Mathematical and Computational Sciences 1

COMMON BREADTH REQUIREMENT

Students must take at least 15 semester hours of credit in courses outside the School of Mathematical and Computational Sciences (excluding one of the UPEI courses listed above), and of these 15 semester hours of credit at least 6 must be from outside the Faculty of Science.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN MATHEMATICS
The Major in Mathematics requires a total of 120 semester hours of credit, as described below:

Credits
The Common Core 23
MATH 2910 Multivariable and Vector Calculus  4
MATH 2620 Linear Algebra II  3
MATH 2720 Mathematical Reasoning 3
At least one of… MCS 2010 MAPLE Technology Lab OR
MCS 2020 Matlab Technology Lab
1
MATH 2420 Combinatorics I 3
MATH 3510 Real Analysis 3
MATH 3610 Group Theory 3
At least one of… MATH 3010 Differential Equations
STAT 2910 Probability and Mathematical Statistics I OR
MATH 3310 Complex Variables
3
Five electives in the Mathematical and Computational Sciences (at the 2000 level or higher with at least two at the 3000 level or higher) 15
MCS 3050 Tutoring in Mathematical and Computational Sciences 1
MCS 4210  Professional Communication and Practice 3
Additional general electives 55
Total Semester Hours of Credit 120

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN STATISTICS
The Major in Statistics requires a total of 120 semester hours of credit, as described below:

Credits
The Common Core 23
MATH 2910 Multivariable and Vector Calculus 4
MATH 2620 Linear Algebra II 3
MATH 2720 Mathematical Reasoning 3
MCS 2030 R Technology Lab 1
STAT 2910 Probability and Mathematical Statistics I 3
STAT 3910 Probability and Mathematical Statistics II 3
STAT 3240 Applied Regression Analysis 3
STAT 4550 Data Analysis and Inference 3
STAT 4240 Experimental Design 3
STAT 4330 Time Series I 3
STAT 4110 Statistical Simulation 3
STAT 4410 Stochastic Processes 3
Two electives in the Mathematical and Computational Sciences (at the 2000 level or higher) 6
MCS 3050 Tutoring in Mathematical and Computational Sciences 1
MCS 4210 Professional Communication and Practice 3
Additional general electives 52
Total Semester Hours of Credit 120

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE
The Major in Computer Science requires a total of 120 semester hours of credit, as described below:

Credits
The Common Core 23
CS 1610 Digital Systems 3
CS 2520 Computer Organization and Architecture 3
CS 2620 Comparative programming Languages 3
CS 2910 Computer Science III 3
CS 2920 Data Structures and Algorithms 3
CS 2820 Programming Practices 3
MATH 2420 Combinatorics I 3
MCS 3320 Theory of Computing 3
CS 3420 Computer Communications 3
CS 3520 Operating Systems 3
CS 3610 Analysis and Design of Algorithms 3
CS 3620 Software Design and Architecture 3
CS 3710 Database Systems 3
CS 4810 Software Engineering  3
One of… CS 4820 Software Systems Development Project OR
CS 4840 Prototype Systems Development
3/6
One elective in Mathematical and Computational Sciences (at the 2000 level or higher) 3
MCS 3050 Tutoring in Mathematical and Computational Sciences 1
MCS 4210 Professional Communication and Practice 3
Additional general electives… if CS 4820 taken 45
OR if CS 4840 taken 42
Total Semester Hours of Credit 120

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN ACTUARIAL SCIENCE
The Major in Actuarial Science requires a total of 120 semester hours of credit, as described below:

Credits
The Common Core 23
MATH 2910 Multivariable and Vector Calculus 4
STAT 2910  Probability and Mathematical Statistics I 3
STAT 3910 Probability and Mathematical Statistics II 3
STAT 3240  Applied Regression Analysis 3
MATH 3010 Differential Equations 3
At least one of… MCS 2040 Visual Basic in Excel Technology Lab OR
AMS 3040 Introduction to GGY Axis Lab
1
MCS 2030
R Technology Lab 1
AMS 2160 Financial Mathematics 3
AMS 2410 Financial Economics I 3
AMS 3410 Financial Economics II 3
AMS 2510 Long Term Actuarial Mathematics I 3
AMS 3510 Long Term Actuarial Mathematics II 3
AMS 3310 Advanced Corporate Finance 3
AMS 4540 Loss Models I 3
AMS 4550 Loss Models II 3
AMS 4700 Short-term Insurance Pricing and Reserving 3
AMS 4580 Credibility Theory 3
At least one of… STAT 4110 Statistical Simulation OR STAT 4330 Time Series I 3
At least one of… STAT 4410 – Stochastic Processes OR STAT 4280 – Generalized Linear Models 3
AMS 2030 Intermediate Microeconomics I 3
AMS 2040 Intermediate Macroeconomics I 3
ACCT 1010 Introduction to Accounting 3
BUS 2310 Corporate Finance 3
MCS 3050 Tutoring in Mathematical and Computational Sciences 1
MCS 4210 Professional Communication and Practice 3
Additional general electives 27

Total Semester Hours of Credit
120

MAJOR IN ACTUARIAL SCIENCE WITH PRE-PROFESSIONAL SPECIALIZATION STREAM
This specialization is designed for those students who plan to complete the full suite of exams required to apply for Associate status from the Canadian Institute of Actuaries or the Society of Actuaries. The specialization contains six additional courses compared with the major.  Students enrolled in the specialization would receive all courses related to the exams needed to obtain the designation of Associate from the Canadian Institute of Actuaries (CIA), as well as the Society of Actuaries (SOA).

Credits
The Common Core 23
MATH 2910 Multivariable and Vector Calculus 4
STAT 2910 Probability and Mathematical Statistics I 3
STAT 3910 Probability and Mathematical Statistics II 3
STAT 3240 Applied Regression Analysis 3
MATH 2620 Linear Algebra II 3
MATH 3010  Differential Equations 3
At least one of… MCS 2040 Visual Basic in Excel Technology Lab OR
AMS 3040 Introduction to GGY Axis Lab
1
MCS 2030 R Technology Lab 1
AMS 2160 Financial Mathematics I 3
AMS 2410 Financial Economics I 3
AMS 3410 Financial Economics II 3
AMS 2510 Long Term Actuarial Mathematics I 3
AMS 3510 Long Term Actuarial Mathematics II 3
AMS 3310 Advanced Corporate Finance 3
AMS 4540 Loss Models I 3
AMS 4550 Loss Models II 3
STAT 3250 Statistical Learning and Modelling 3
AMS 4600 Predictive Analytics 3
AMS 4610 Predictive Analytics for Actuaries 3
AMS 4700 Short-term Insurance Pricing and Reserving 3
AMS 4580 Credibility Theory 3
At least one of… STAT 4110 Statistical Simulation OR STAT 4330 Time Series I 3
STAT 4410 Stochastic Processes 3
STAT 4280 Generalized Linear Models 3
MCS 3920 Numerical Analysis 3
AMS 2030 Intermediate Microeconomics I 3
AMS 2040 Intermediate Macroeconomics I 3
ACCT 1010 Introduction to Accounting 3
BUS 2310 Corporate Finance 3
MCS 3050 Tutoring in Mathematical and Computational Sciences 1
MCS 4210 Professional Communication and Practice 3
Additional general electives 9
Total Semester Hours of Credit              120

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN FINANCIAL MATHEMATICS
The Major in Financial Mathematics requires a total of 120 semester hours of credit, as described below:

Credits
The Common Core 23
MATH 2910 Multivariable and Vector Calculus 4
MATH 2620 Linear Algebra II 3
MATH 2720 Mathematical Reasoning 3
STAT 2910 Probability and Mathematical Statistics I 3
STAT 3910 Probability and Mathematical Statistics II 3
STAT 3240 Applied Regression Analysis 3
At least one of … MCS 2020 Matlab Technology Lab
MCS 2030R Technology Lab OR
MCS 2040 Visual Basic in Excel Technology Lab
1
AMS 2160 Financial Mathematics I 3
AMS 2410 Financial Economics I 3
AMS 3410 Financial Economics II 3
AMS 4080 Financial Mathematics II 3
AMS 4090 Financial Mathematics III 3
AMS 3910 Mathematical Modelling 3
AMS 3310 Advanced Corporate Finance 3
MATH 3010 Differential Equations 3
MATH 3510 Real Analysis 3
STAT 4330 Time Series I 3
STAT 4410 Stochastic Processes 3
MCS 3920 Numerical Analysis 3
EC 1010 Introductory Microeconomics 3
EC 1020 Introductory Macroeconomics 3
ACCT 1010 Introduction to Accounting 3
BUS 2310 Corporate Finance 3
At least one of… ECON 2510 Money and Financial Institutions
BUS 3330 Integrated Cases in Corporate Finance
BUS 3660 Entrepreneurial Finance OR
BUS 3340 Personal Finance

3
MCS 3050 Tutoring in Mathematical and Computational Sciences 1
MCS 4210 Professional Communication and Practice 3
Additional general electives 22
Total Semester Hours of Credit  120

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN ANALYTICS (Specialization in Data Analytics)
The Major in Analytics with a specialization in Data Analytics requires a total of 120 semester hours of credit, as described below:

Credits
The Common Core 23
MATH 2910  Multivariable and Vector Calculus 4
MATH 2620  Linear Algebra II 3
MATH 2720  Mathematical Reasoning 3
At least one of MCS 2010 MAPLE Technology Lab
MCS 2020 Matlab Technology Lab
OR
MCS 2030 R Technology Lab
1
MATH 2420  Combinatorics I 3
MATH 3430  Combinatorics II 3
AMS 2940  Optimization 3
AMS 3770  Combinatorial Optimization 3
AMS 3910 Mathematical Modelling 3
MATH 3010 Differential Equations 3
MATH 3610  Group Theory 3
STAT 2910  Probability and Mathematical Statistics I 3
STAT 3910  Probability and Mathematical Statistics II 3
STAT 3240  Applied Regression Analysis 3
STAT 4550  Data Analysis and Inference 3
STAT 4660  Data Visualization and Mining 3
CS 2910  Computer Science III 3
CS 2920  Data Structures and Algorithms 3
CS 3710  Database Systems 3
CS 3610  Analysis and Design of Algorithms 3
CS 4120  Machine Learning 3
CS 4440  Data Science 3
Two electives in Mathematical or Computational Sciences  (at the 2000 level or higher) 6
MCS 3050  Tutoring in Mathematical and Computational Sciences 1
MCS 4210  Professional Communication and Practice 3
Additional general electives   22
Total Semester Hours of Credit   120

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN ANALYTICS (Specialization in Business Analytics)

The Major in Analytics with a specialization in Business Analytics requires a total of 120 semester hours of credit, as described below:

Credits
The Common Core 23
MATH 2910 Multivariable and Vector Calculus 4
MATH 2620 Linear Algebra II 3
MATH 2720 Mathematical Reasoning 3
At least one of MCS 2010 MAPLE Technology Lab
MCS 2020 Matlab Technology Lab OR
MCS 2030 R Technology Lab
1
MATH 2420 Combinatorics I 3
MATH 3430 Combinatorics II 3
AMS 2940 Optimization 3
AMS 3770 Combinatorial Optimization 3
AMS 3910 Mathematical Modelling 3
MATH 3010 Differential Equations 3
STAT 2910 Probability and Mathematical Statistics I 3
STAT 3910 Probability and Mathematical Statistics II 3
STAT 3240 Applied Regression Analysis 3
STAT 4660 Data Visualization and Mining 3
Two electives in the Mathematical and Computational Sciences (at the 3000 level or higher) 6
CS 2910 Computer Science III 3
CS 2920 Data Structures and Algorithms 3
CS 3710 Database Systems 3
ACCT 1010 Introduction to Financial Accounting 3
BUS 1410 Marketing 3
BUS 1710 Organizational Behaviour 3
At least five of ACCT 2210 Managerial Accounting
BUS 2650 Introduction to Entrepreneurship …
BUS 2880 Research and Evidence-Based Management
BUS 2720 Human Resource Management
BUS 3010 Business Law
BUS 3330 Integrated Cases in Corporate Finance
BUS 3510 Operations Management
BUS 3710 Entrepreneurship and New Ventures
BUS 4650 Project Management OR
BUS 4880 Developing Management Skills
15
MCS 3050 Tutoring in Mathematical and Computational Sciences 1
MCS 4210 Professional Communication and Practice 3
Additional general electives 13
Total Semester Hours of Credit   120

Note: Students who complete the Major in Analytics with a specialization in Business Analytics and obtain grades of at least 60% in seven of the Business courses can also obtain a Certificate in Business.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN MATHEMATICS WITH ENGINEERING

The Major in Mathematics with Engineering requires a total of 120 semester hours of credit, as described below:

Credits
The Common Core 23
MATH 2910 Multivariable and Vector Calculus 4
MATH 2620 Linear Algebra II 3
MATH 2720 Mathematical Reasoning 3
MATH 3010 Differential Equations 3
MATH 3310 Complex Variables 3
At least one of MATH 3510 Real Analysis OR MATH 361 Group Theory 3
Two electives in Mathematical and Computational Sciences (at the 3000 level or higher) 6
PHYS 1110 and 1120 General Physics I and II 6
CHEM 1110 and 1120 General Chemistry I and II 6
ENGN 1210 Engineering Communications 3
ENGN 1220 Engineering Analysis 3
ENGN 1510 Engineering and the Biosphere 3
ENGN 2210 Engineering Projects I 3
ENGN 2220 Engineering Projects II 3
ENGN 2310 Strength of Materials 3
ENGN 1340 (formerly 2340) Engineering Dynamics 3
ENGN 2610 Thermo Fluids I 3
ENGN 2810 Electrical Circuits 3
Two electives in Engineering 6
Additional general electives 27
Total Semester Hours of Credit    120

Note: Mathematics with Engineering Majors may substitute ENGN 1320 for CS 1510, and CS 1610 or MCS 3920 for CS 1520.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE (Specialization in Video Game Programming)

The Major in Computer Science with a specialization in Video Game Programming requires a total of 120 semester hours of credit, as described below:

Credits
The Common Core 23
CS 1610 Digital Systems 3
CS 3130 Mobile Device Development- Android 3
CS 2520 Computer Organization and Architecture 3
CS 2910 Computer Science III 3
CS 2920 Data Structures and Algorithms 3
CS 2820 Programming Practices 3
CS 2620 Comparative Programming Languages 3
MATH 2420 Combinatorics I 3
MCS 2050 C++ Technology Lab 1
CS 3110 Video Game Design 3
MCS 3320 Theory of Computing 3
CS 3420 Computer Communications 3
CS 3520 Operating Systems 3
CS 3610 Analysis and Design of Algorithms 3
CS 3620 Software Design and Architecture 3
CS 3710 Database Systems 3
CS 4350 Computer Graphics Programming 3
CS 4360 Advanced Computer Graphics Programming 3
At least two of CS 4060 Cloud Computing
CS 4120 Machine Learning
CS 4440 Data Science OR
CS 4610  Wireless Sensor Networks
6
CS 4650 Video Game Architecture 3
CS 4810 Software Engineering 3
CS 4830  Video Game Programming Project 6
One elective in the Mathematical and Computational Sciences  (at the 2000 level or higher) 3
MCS 3050 Tutoring in Mathematical and Computational Sciences 1
MCS 4210  Professional Communication and Practice 3
Additional general electives 20
Total Semester Hours of Credit   120

ACCEPTANCE TO AN HONOURS PROGRAM
Students in the Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science programs have an Honours option. Permission of the School of Mathematical and Computational Sciences is required for admission to an Honours program. Students must normally have a minimum average of 70% in all previous courses. Normally, the School expects an average of 75% in all previous Mathematical and Computational Sciences courses. Admission is contingent upon the student finding a project advisor and acceptance by the School of the topic for the Honours project. Students interested in doing Honours are strongly encouraged to consult with the Associate Dean of the School of Mathematical and Computational Sciences as soon as possible, and no later than January 31 of the student’s third year. To receive the Honours designation, in addition to successful completion of the Honours project, normally students must maintain an average of at least 75% in all courses in the School of Mathematical and Computational Sciences.

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONOURS IN MATHEMATICS
The Honours in Mathematics program requires a total of 126 semester hours of credit, as described below:

Credits
The Common Core 23
MATH 2910 Multivariable and Vector Calculus 4
MATH 2620 Linear Algebra II 3
MATH 2720 Mathematical Reasoning 3
At least one of MCS 2010 MAPLE Technology Lab OR MCS 2020 Matlab Technology Lab 1
MATH 2420 Combinatorics I 3
MATH 3510 Real Analysis 3
MATH 3610 Group Theory 3
MATH 3010 Differential Equations 3
STAT 3210 Probability and Mathematical Statistics I 3
MATH 3310 Complex Variables 3
MCS 4900 Honours Project 6
Four electives in the Mathematical and Computational Sciences (at the 2000 level or higher, with at least two at the 4000 level or higher) 12
MCS 3050 Tutoring in Mathematical and Computational Sciences 1
MCS 4210 Professional Communication and Practice 3
Additional general electives 52
Total Semester Hours of Credit   126

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONOURS IN STATISTICS
The Honours in Statistics program requires a total of 126 semester hours of credit, as described below:

Credits
The Common Core 23
MATH 2910 Multivariable and Vector Calculus 4
MATH 2620 Linear Algebra II 3
MATH 2720 Mathematical Reasoning 3
MCS 2030 R Technology Lab 1
STAT 2910 Probability and Mathematical Statistics I 3
STAT 3910 Probability and Mathematical Statistics II 3
STAT 3240 Applied Regression Analysis 3
STAT 4550 Data Analysis and Inference 3
STAT 4240 Experimental Design 3
STAT 4330 Time Series I 3
STAT 4110 Statistical Simulation 3
STAT 4410 Stochastic Processes 3
MCS 4900 Honours Project 6
Two electives in the Mathematical and Computational Sciences (at the 3000 level or higher) 6
MCS 3050 Tutoring in Mathematical and Computational Sciences 1
MCS 4210 Professional Communication and Practice 3
Additional general electives 52
Total Semester Hours of Credit   126

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONOURS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

The Honours in Computer Science requires a total of 126 semester hours of credit, as described below:

Credits
The Common Core 23
CS 1610 Digital Systems 3
CS 2520 Computer Organization and Architecture 3
CS 2910 Computer Science III 3
CS 2920 Data Structures and Algorithms 3
CS 2820 Programming Practices 3
MATH 2420 Combinatorics I 3
MATH 2910 Multivariable Calculus 4
MCS 3320 Theory of Computing 3
CS 3420 Computer Communications 3
CS 3520 Operating Systems 3
CS 3610 Analysis and Design of Algorithms 3
CS 3620 Software Design and Architecture 3
CS 3710 Database Systems 3
At least one of CS 4110 Artificial Intelligence and Automated Reasoning OR CS 4120 Machine Learning 3
CS 4810 Software Engineering 3
MCS 4900 Honours Research Project 6
Three electives in the Mathematical and Computational Sciences (at the 2000 level or higher) 9
MCS 3050 Tutoring in Mathematical and Computational Sciences 1
MCS 4210 Professional Communication and Practice 3
Additional general electives 35
Total Semester Hours of Credit   126

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN MATHEMATICS
Students may obtain a Minor in Mathematics by completing at least 24 semester hours of credit in Mathematics defined as follows:

MATH 1910-1920 Single Variable Calculus I & II (8 credits)
MATH 2610 Linear Algebra I (3 credits)
MATH 2910 Multivariable and Vector Calculus (4 credits)
Plus 3 semester hours of credit in Mathematics at the 3000 level or higher, and an additional 6 semester hours of credit of Mathematics at the 2000 level or above. (9 credits)
Total Semester Hours of Credit   24

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN STATISTICS
Students may obtain a Minor in Statistics by completing at least 23 semester hours of credit in Mathematics and Statistics defined as follows:

MATH 1910-1920 Single Variable Calculus I & II (8 credits)
STAT 1910 Introduction to Probability and Statistics (3 credits)
MATH 2610 Linear Algebra I (3 credits)
STAT 2910 Probability and Mathematical Statistics I (3 credits)
Plus 6 semester hours of credit in Statistics  at the 3000 level or higher  (6 credits)
Total Semester Hours of Credit    23

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE
Students may obtain a Minor in Computer Science by completing at least 21 semester hours of credit in Computer Science defined as follows:

CS 1910-1920 Computer Science I & II  (6 credits)
CS 2520 Computer Organization and Architecture (3 credits)
CS 2920 Data Structures and Algorithms (3 credits)
Plus 3 semester hours of credit in Computer Science at the 3000 level or higher, and an additional 6 semester hours of credit in Computer Science at the 2000 level or higher.
  (9 credits)
Total Semester Hours of Credit   21

CO-OP EDUCATION IN MATHEMATICAL AND COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCES

The UPEI Co-op Program is an integrated approach to university education which enables students to alternate academic terms on campus with work terms in suitable employment. The success of such programs is founded on the principle that students are able to apply theoretical knowledge from course studies in the workplace and return to the classroom with practical workplace experience. Students who successfully complete all the requirements of the program will have the notation entered on their transcripts and on the graduation parchment.

Students accepted into the program complete at least three paid work terms of normally 14 weeks duration, and three professional development courses. Credits earned through completion of work terms are counted as general electives.

The Co-op option is available to full-time students in any MCS Major or Honours program. Applications to the Co-op Education Program are normally made after completion of the first year of study. MCS students must complete 126 semester hours of credit in order to graduate with the Co-op designation.

See the Co-operative Education Program section of the UPEI Academic Calendar for more information.

ADMISSION TO SCIENCE CALCULUS
The First-year Calculus courses for most science students are Math 1910 and Math 1920. In addition to Grade XII academic Mathematics (or equivalent), a passing grade on an Assessment Test written during the first week of classes is required as a prerequisite for Math 1910. The Assessment Test covers the standard pre-calculus topics of the High School curriculum (arithmetic, algebra, trigonometry, analytic geometry and the basic theory of functions). This test is of 90 minutes duration and is given during the first week of classes. Students who do not pass the assessment test may have the option of enrolling in a special section of Math 1910 incorporating additional tutorials reviewing pre-Calculus materials. See the Associate Dean of the School of Mathematical and Computational Sciences for details.

SELECTION OF COURSES
Students majoring in a program in the School of Mathematical and Computational Sciences may not use Math 1010, Math 1110 or Math 1120 for credit towards the degree.

Students majoring in a program in the School of Mathematical and Computational Sciences may count a maximum of three semester hours of credit from Technology Labs towards their degree.

COURSE CREDIT
Unless otherwise noted in the course description below, a course in the School of Mathematical and Computational Sciences gives three semester hours of credit.

MATHEMATICS COURSES (MATH PREFIX)

1010 ELEMENTS OF MATHEMATICS
This course provides an introduction to several mathematical topics at the university level, and is intended for students majoring in a discipline other than Mathematical and Computational Sciences, or the Natural Sciences. The course consists of four modules: (1) Sets and Logic, (2) Number Theory, (3) Geometry, (4) Mathematical Systems.
PREREQUISITE: Grade XII academic Mathematics
Three lecture hours a week
NOTE: Credit will not be given jointly for this course and any other 1000-level Mathematics course.

1110 FINITE MATHEMATICS
This course introduces students to finite mathematical techniques and to mathematical models in business, life and the social sciences. The course begins with an introduction to mathematical models, types of models, and conversion of verbal models to mathematical models. Topics covered include systems of linear equations and matrices, linear inequalities and linear programming, sets, counting and probability.
PREREQUISITE: Grade XII academic Mathematics
Three lecture hours a week
NOTE: Credit for Mathematics 1110 will not be allowed if taken concurrent with or subsequent to Mathematics 2610.

1120 CALCULUS FOR THE MANAGERIAL, SOCIAL AND LIFE SCIENCES
This course provides an introduction to calculus for students in the managerial, social and life sciences. The main emphasis of the course is the development of techniques of differentiation and integration of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions. Applications of derivatives and integrals are also discussed.
PREREQUISITE: Grade XII academic Mathematics
Three lecture hours a week
NOTE: Credit will not be given jointly for this course and Math 1910

1910 SINGLE VARIABLE CALCULUS I
This course is an introduction to differential and integral calculus of functions of a single variable. The course is intended primarily for majors in the Mathematical and Computational Sciences, Engineering and the Physical Sciences, as well as those planning to continue with further Mathematics courses. The concepts of limits, continuity and derivatives are introduced and explored numerically, graphically and analytically. The tools of differential calculus are applied to problems in: related rates; velocity and acceleration; extrema of functions; optimization; curve sketching; and indeterminate forms. The concepts of definite and indefinite integrals are introduced, and the relation between the two integrals is discovered via the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.
PREREQUISITE: Grade XII academic Mathematics
Four lecture hours and one tutorial hour per week
Semester hours of credit: 4
(Note: An Assessment Test will be administered during the first week of classes and students who do not pass the Assessment Test will be required to attend an additional Pre-Calculus Review tutorial if they wish to remain in the course.)

1920 SINGLE VARIABLE CALCULUS II
This course is a continuation of integral calculus of functions of a single variable and an introduction to sequences and series. Techniques of integration are studied, including improper integrals and numerical integration, and the tools of integral calculus are used to compute areas, volumes and arc lengths; and are applied to problems in physics and differential equations. Sequences, series, tests for convergence, Taylor series and Taylor polynomials are studied.
PREREQUISITE: Math 1910
Four lecture hours and one tutorial hour per week
Semester hours of credit: 4

2420 COMBINATORICS I
This course offers a survey of topics in combinatorics that are essential for students majoring in the Mathematical or Computational Sciences. Topics include: logic, proof techniques such as mathematical induction, recursion, counting methods, and introductory graph theory.
PREREQUISITE: Math 1920
Three lecture hours per week

2610 LINEAR ALGEBRA I
This course introduces some of the basic concepts and techniques of linear algebra to students of any major. The emphasis is on the interpretation and development of computational tools. Theory is explained mainly on the basis of two or three-dimensional models. Topics covered are: matrices; determinants; systems of equations; vectors in two and three-dimensional space including dot and cross products, lines, and planes; concepts of linear independence, basis, and dimension explained with examples; linear transformations and their matrices; eigenvectors and eigenvalues.
PREREQUISITE: Grade XII academic Mathematics
Three lecture hours per week

2620 LINEAR ALGEBRA II
This course continues MATH 261 with further concepts and theory of linear algebra. Topics include real and complex vector spaces, orthogonality, Gram-Schmidt Process, canonical forms, spectral decompositions, inner product spaces and the projection theorem.
PREREQUISITE: Math 1910, Math 2610
Three lecture hours a week

2720 MATHEMATICAL REASONING
This course provides students with experience in writing mathematical arguments. It covers first-order logic, set theory, relations, and functions. The ideas and proof techniques are considered in the context of various mathematical structures such as partial orders, graphs, number systems, and finite groups.
PREREQUISITE: None
Three lecture hours per week

2810 FOUNDATIONS OF GEOMETRY
This course presents an axiomatic base for Euclidean geometry and an insight into the interdependence of the various theorems and axioms of that geometry and non-Euclidean geometries. Topics include: incidence and separation properties for points, lines, planes and space; congruence properties; geometric inequalities; similarity properties; and geometric constructions.
PREREQUISITE: Six semester hours of First Year Mathematics
Three lecture hours per week

2820 MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS
See Physics 2820
PREREQUISITE: Math 2910 and either Physics 1120 or Physics 1220

2910 MULTIVARIABLE AND VECTOR CALCULUS
This course continues from Math 1920 and is an introduction to multivariable differentiation and integration and vector calculus. Topics include parametric representation of curves; polar coordinates; vectors; dot and cross products; curves and surfaces in space; calculus of vector-valued functions; functions of several variables; partial differentiation; directional derivatives; tangent planes; local and constrained maxima and minima; double and triple integrals; changes of variables in multiple integrals; vector fields; line and surface integrals; gradient, divergence and curl; Green’s, Stokes’ and Divergence Theorems.
PREREQUISITE: Math 1920
Four lecture hours per week
Semester hours of credit: 4

3010 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
This course introduces the basic theory of differential equations, considers various techniques for their solution, and provides elementary applications. Topics include linear equations; separable equations; linear independence and Wronskian; second-order equations with constant coefficients; nonhomogeneous equations; applications of first- and second-order equations; Laplace and inverse Laplace transforms, and their application to initial-value problems; series solutions about ordinary and singular points; and Fourier series.
PREREQUISITE: Math 1920
Three lecture hours per week

3310 COMPLEX VARIABLES
This is a first course in complex variables. The aim is to acquaint students with the elementary complex functions, their properties and derivatives, and with methods of integration. Topics covered include: definition and development of complex numbers as ordered pairs; geometric representation; basic formulas and inequalities involving argument and conjugates; roots of complex numbers, limit, continuity, and derivative; Cauchy Riemann conditions; harmonic functions; properties of trigonometric, hyperbolic, logarithmic, exponential, and inverse trigonometric functions; bilinear transformation; integration; Cauchy Integral Theorem and Formula; residues and poles; Laurent and Taylor’s series; and improper integrals.
PREREQUISITE: Math 2910
Three lecture hours per week

3420 NUMBER THEORY
This first course in number theory will include the following topics: equivalence of the principles of induction and the well-ordering principle; division algorithm; positional notation and repeating decimals; greatest common divisor; Euclidean Algorithm; Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic; Pythagorean Triplets; Prime Numbers Theorem; Mersenne and Fermat Numbers; congruences; Euler’s Phi-function; Chinese Remainder Theorem; Diophantine Equations; Theorems of Lagrange and Wilson; Quadratic Reciprocity Law of Gauss; Legendre symbol and primitive roots; perfect numbers; multiplicative number- theoretic functions; Moebius inversion.
PREREQUISITE: Six semester hours of Mathematics at the 2000 level or higher
Three lecture hours per week

3430 COMBINATORICS II
This course continues MATH 2420, with the examination of advanced counting techniques, binomial coefficients, and generating functions. Other topics include relations, partial orders, and Steiner Triple systems.
PREREQUISITE: Math 2420
Three lecture hours per week

3510 REAL ANALYSIS
This is a first course in real analysis. Topics include: the reals as a complete ordered field; closed and open sets; Bolzano-Weierstrass and Heine-Borel Theorems; Cauchy Sequences; limits and continuity; derivative; Mean Value Theorem; Riemann Integral; and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.
PREREQUISITE: Math 1920 and Math 2720
Three lecture hours per week

3610 GROUP THEORY
An introduction to group theory, including: cyclic groups, symmetric groups, subgroups and normal subgroups, Lagrange’s theorem, quotient groups and homomorphisms, isomorphism theorems, group actions, Sylow’s theorem, simple groups, direct and semidirect products, fundamental theorem on finitely generated Abelian groups.
PREREQUISITE: Math 2720
Three lecture hours per week

3710 GRAPH THEORY
This course is an introduction to the ideas, methods, and applications of graph theory. Topics include graph connectivity, graph factors and factorizations, planar graphs, and colourings.
PREREQUISITE: Math 2420 or Math 2720
Three lecture hours per week

4020 POINT-SET TOPOLOGY
A first course in topology, covering some review of set theory; cardinal numbers; binary relations; metric spaces, convergence and continuity in metric spaces; topological spaces, bases, sub- spaces; continuity in general; homeomorphism; product spaces; separation axioms; compactness; connectedness.
PREREQUISITE: Math 3510
Three lecture hours per week

4520 MEASURE THEORY AND INTEGRATION
A first course in measure theory, covering measure as a generalization of length, outer measure, sigma-algebras, measurability, construction of measures, Lebesgue measure on the real line, measurable functions and the Lebesgue integral. Additional topics may include and convergence theorems, product measures and Fubini Theorem.
PREREQUISITE: Math 3510
Three lecture hours per week

4530 FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS
This first course in functional analysis covers topics like: metric spaces, Banach spaces, function spaces, Hilbert spaces, generalized Fourier series and linear operators.
PREREQUISITE: Math 2620 and Math 3510
Three lecture hours per week

4620 RING AND FIELD THEORY
Introduction to ring and field theory, including: polynomial rings, matrix rings, ideals and homomorphisms, quotient rings, Chinese remainder theorem, Euclidean domains, principal ideal domains, unique factorization domains, introduction to module theory, basic theory of field extensions, splitting fields and algebraic closures, finite fields, introduction to Galois theory.
PREREQUISITE: Math 3610
Three lecture hours per week

4710 PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
This course is an introduction to the theory and application of partial differential equations. Topics include: first-order equations and characteristic curves; classification of second-order equations as parabolic, hyperbolic or elliptic; Laplace, wave and diffusion equations, and their physical origins; solution using Fourier series; and separation of variables.
PREREQUISITE: Math 2910 and Math 3010
Three lecture hours per week

4720 DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS
This course is a study of the long-term qualitative behaviour of solutions of systems of differential or difference equations. Topics include: non-linear systems, linearization, numerical and graphical methods, equilibria, phase space, stability, bifurcations, strange attractors, and chaos. Applications to physics, biology and other sciences are studied.
PREREQUISITE: Math 2610, Math 2910 and Math 3010
Three lecture hours per week

STATISTICS COURSES (STAT PREFIX)

1210 INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS
The main objective of this course is to introduce the basic concepts of descriptive statistics, statistical inference, and the use of statistical software such as MINITAB to students in any discipline. More time is spent on statistical inference than on descriptive statistics. Topics include frequency distributions, descriptive statistics, rules of probability, discrete and continuous probability distributions, random sampling and sampling distributions, confidence intervals, one- and two-tail tests of hypotheses, and correlation and linear regression.
PREREQUISITE: Grade XII academic Mathematics.
Three lecture hours per week
NOTE: Credit will not be allowed for Statistics 1210 if a student has received credit for any of the following courses: Business 2510, Education 4810, Psychology 2710 and Sociology 3320. Credit for Statistics 1210 will not be allowed if taken concurrent with or subsequent to Statistics 1910.

1910 INTRODUCTION TO PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS
This course provides an introduction to the theory and applications of statistics and probability. Topics include descriptive statistics, statistical inference for means and proportions, analysis of variance (ANOVA), correlation and regression.  Note that this course is designed for students who have a firm grasp of grade 12 math skills, and is a prerequisite for all additional statistics courses.
Three lecture hours plus a one hour tutorial per week

2910 PROBABILITY AND MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS I
This course is an introduction to the theoretical basis of statistics for students who have completed STAT 1910. The study concentrates on the mathematical tools required to develop statistical methodology. Topics covered include: probability, continuous and discrete random variables, moment generating functions, multivariate probability distributions and functions of random variables.
PREREQUISITE: Math 2910 and Stat 1910 or permission of the instructor.
Three lecture hours per week

3240 APPLIED REGRESSION ANALYSIS
This course builds upon the basis of inference studied in Statistics 1910 and provides students with an advanced knowledge of regression techniques. Topics covered are simple and multiple linear regression techniques, matrix notation, the design matrix, model building techniques, residual analysis, and non-linear regression.
PREREQUISITE: Stat 1910 and Math 2610
Three lecture hours per week

3250 STATISTICAL LEARNING AND MODELLING
This course covers topics such as the key concepts of statistical learning and regression modelling with applications; linear models; time series models; principal components analysis; decision trees; and cluster analysis with their applications in R.
PREREQUISITES: MCS 2030, STAT 3240 and STAT 2910
Three lecture hours per week plus a one hour lab per week

3910 PROBABILITY AND MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS II
This course builds on the mathematical foundation developed in Statistics 2910 and introduces the student to the theory of statistical inference. Topics covered include: sampling distributions and central limit theory, methods of estimation, hypothesis testing, least squares estimation of linear models, and an introduction to Bayesian inference.
PREREQUISITE: Stat 2910
Three lecture hours per week

4110 STATISTICAL SIMULATION
This course introduces statistical simulation, and its use as a tool to investigate stochastic phenomena and statistical methods. Topics include the building and validation of stochastic simulation models useful in computing, operations research, engineering and science; related design and estimation problems; variance reduction; and the implementation and the analysis of the results.
PREREQUISITE: Stat 3910
Three lecture hours per week

4240 EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN
This course builds upon the basis of inference studied in Statistics 1210 and Statistics 3240 to include statistical techniques commonly used in experimental studies. Students will study topics such as analysis of variance models, hypothesis testing in ANOVA models, randomization, and blocking techniques.
PREREQUISITE: Stat 3240
Three lecture hours per week

4280 GENERALIZED LINEAR MODELS
This course covers the basic theory, methodology and applications of generalized linear models. Topics include logistic regression, probit regression, binomial regression, Poisson regression, overdispersion, quasi-likelihood, and the exponential family.
PREREQUISITE: Stat 3240 and Stat 3910
Three lecture hours per week

4330 TIME SERIES I
This course is an introduction to Time Series methods, including: stationary models, trends and seasonality, stochastic Time Series models, autoregressive and moving average processes and an introduction to Time Series forecasting. ARIMA models. Seasonal Time Series and Spectral Analysis are also covered.
PREREQUISITE: Stat 3240
Three lecture hours per week

4340 TIME SERIES II
This course includes topics from Time Series Econometrics, including Maximum Likelihood and Least Squares Estimation of ARIMA Models and GARCH Models, Wavelets and Financial Models. Non-stationary Time Series, multivariate Time Series and panel cointegration analysis are also covered.
PREREQUISITE: Stat 4330
Three lecture hours per week

4410 STOCHASTIC PROCESSES
This course is an introduction to the branch of probability theory that deals with the analysis of systems that evolve over time. Topics include random walks, Markov chains, Poisson processes, continuous time Markov chains, birth and death processes, exponential models, and applications of Markov chains.
PREREQUISITE: Stat 3910
Three lecture hours per week

4550 DATA ANALYSIS AND INFERENCE
This course is an introduction to data analysis with a focus on regression. Topics include: initial examination of data, correlation, and simple and multiple regression models using least squares. Inference for regression parameters, confidence and prediction intervals, diagnostics and remedial measures interactions and dummy variables, variable selection, least squares estimation and inference for non-linear regression will also be discussed.
PREREQUISITE: Stat 3240
Three lecture hours per week

4660 DATA VISUALIZATION AND MINING
This course introduces students to the statistical methods involved in visualization of high dimensional data, including interactive methods directed at exploration and assessment of structure and dependencies in data. Topics include methods for finding groups in data including cluster analysis, dimension reduction methods including multi-dimensional scaling, pattern recognition, and smoothing techniques.
PREREQUISITE: Math 2620, Math 2910 and Stat 2910
Three lecture hours per week

4740 MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS
This course deals with the statistics of observation and analysis of more than one output variable. Topics include estimation and hypothesis testing for multivariate normal data, principal component analysis and factor analysis, discriminant analysis, cluster analysis, and correspondence analysis.
PREREQUISITE: Stat 3240
Three lecture hours per week

COMPUTER SCIENCE COURSES (CS PREFIX)

1610 DIGITAL SYSTEMS
This course provides an introduction to digital systems, beginning with elementary components such as logic gates, from which are constructed components such as adders and comparators, and progressing to more complex systems such as programmable logic devices, memory and processor units. Students acquire skills in the design and analysis of combinational and sequential digital systems, CAD design and simulation tools for complex systems, and construction of digital systems based upon a modular methodology.
PREREQUISITE: CS 1910 or Engineering 1310, and three semester hours of Mathematics
Three lecture hours and a three-hour laboratory session per week

1910 COMPUTER SCIENCE I
This course is an introduction to computer programming and is designed for both Computer Science majors and non-majors. Emphasis is on problem solving and software development using a modern high level object-oriented language. Topics include: the programming process; language syntax and semantics; data types; expressions; input and output; conditionals; loops; arrays; functions/methods and text files. The course follows an “objects late” strategy, deferring in-depth discussion of object-oriented concepts to Computer Science 1920.
PREREQUISITE: Grade XII academic Mathematics
Three lecture hours and 1.5 hours lab per week

1920 COMPUTER SCIENCE II
This course continues the development of object-oriented programming. Topics include class design; inheritance; interfaces and polymorphism; collection classes; searching and sorting; recursion; exception handling; the Model-View-Controller pattern; and graphical user interfaces.
PREREQUISITE: CS 1910
Three lecture hours and 1.5 hours lab per week

2060 WEB DEVELOPMENT AND PROGRAMMING
In this course, students learn to create websites that involve server-side scripting and database operations. While one specific scripting language is used to acquire web development and programming skills, students are exposed to a spectrum of scripting languages, enabling them to easily adapt to others.
PREREQUISITES: CS 1920
Three hours per week

2520 COMPUTER ORGANIZATION AND ARCHITECTURE
This course provides a basic understanding of the organization and architecture of modern computer systems. It examines the function and design of major hardware components both from a designer’s perspective and through assembly language programming. Topics include components and their interconnection, internal/external memory, input/output subsystems, processors, computer arithmetic, instruction sets, addressing modes, and pipelining.
PREREQUISITE: CS 1920 and CS 1610.  CS 1610 may be taken as a co-requisite.
Three hours per week

2620 COMPARATIVE PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES
This course examines the principal features of major types of programming languages, including procedural, logical, functional and object-oriented languages. Features include parameter-passing mechanisms, control structures, scope, and binding rules. Each language type is illustrated by considering a specific language.
PREREQUISITE: CS 1920
Three lecture hours per week

2710 PRACTICAL EMBEDDED SYSTEMS
This course introduces students to the concept of embedded systems architectures, the interconnection of sensors and actuators to such systems, and the usage of such platforms for data acquisition and control of automated systems. Popular microcontroller units and system-on-chip platforms will be examined.
PREREQUISITES: CS 1210 or CS 1410 or CS 1910 or ENGN 1310
Three lecture hours per week

2820 PROGRAMMING PRACTICES
This course introduces the student to development in the Unix/Linux environment. Topics include development tools, shell programming, common utility programs, processes, file/directory management, IDEs, testing/debugging, version control, and an introduction to software engineering.
PREREQUISITE: CS 1920 or permission of the instructor (based on completion of CS 1910 with first class standing)
Three lecture hours per week

2910 COMPUTER SCIENCE III
This is the third course in the Computer Science programming sequence. It covers more advanced programming concepts in an object oriented language. It also serves as an introduction to data structures and software engineering. Topics included: the programming toolchain; threads; class generics; lists, stacks, queues and binary trees; streams and binary I/O, object serialization, networking (sockets and web interface); introduction to software engineering; relational database connectivity; and XML parsing.
PREREQUISITE: CS 1920 and six hours of Mathematics
Three lecture hours and 1.5 hours lab per week

2920 DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS
This course continues the study of data structures, recursive algorithms, searching and sorting techniques, and general strategies for problem solving. It also introduces complexity analysis and complexity classes.
PREREQUISITE: CS 2910 and six semester hours of Mathematics
Three lecture hours per week

3110 VIDEO GAME DESIGN
This course focuses on the process from initial idea to final design of a video game. Students will craft a game document from an original concept of their own creation and create a prototype of the game based on that document.
PREREQUISITE: CS 2920
Three lecture hours per week

3130 MOBILE DEVICE DEVELOPMENT – ANDROID
This course introduces the student to programming for mobile devices that use the Android platform. The course will present a study of the architecture, operating system and programming language of these devices.
PREREQUISITE: CS 2920
Three lecture hours per week

3210 HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERFACE DESIGN
This course is an introduction to the design and evaluation of software interfaces and webpages. The course focuses on user-centered design and includes topics such as user analysis and modelling, iterative prototyping, usability testing, designing for the web, internationalization and localization.
PREREQUISITES: CS 1920
Three hours per week

3220 INTRODUCTION TO BIOINFORMATICS 
This course is an introduction to bioinformatics, with a focus on a practical guide to the analysis of data on genes and proteins. It familiarizes students with the tools and principles of contemporary bioinformatics. Students acquire a working knowledge of a variety of publicly available data and computational tools important in bioinformatics, and a grasp of the underlying principles enabling them to evaluate and use novel techniques as they arise in the future.  
Cross-listed with Biology 3220, VPM 8850 and Human Biology 8850.
PREREQUISITE: CS 2920 or BIO 2230 or permission of instructor.  If taken as VPM 8850 or HB 8850 – Admission to the graduate program and permission of the instructor.
Three lecture hours and a one-hour laboratory session per week
Note:  No student can be awarded more than one course credit among HB 8850, VPM 8850, CS 3220 and BIO 3220.

3420 COMPUTER COMMUNICATIONS
This course introduces the basic principles of modern computer communication: protocols, architectures and standards. Topics include layered architectures, data transmission, error and flow control, medium access, routing, congestion control and common internet application protocols.
PREREQUISITE: CS 2520 and CS 2820
Three lecture hours per week

3520 OPERATING SYSTEMS
This course introduces the student to the major concepts of modern operating systems. Topics covered include: process management, memory management, file systems, device management and security.
PREREQUISITE: CS 2520, CS 2920 and CS 2820
Three lecture hours per week

3610 ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF ALGORITHMS
This course, which introduces the study of algorithm design and measures of efficiency, is a continuation of CS 2920 Topics include algorithm complexity and analysis; techniques such as divide and conquer, greedy and dynamic programming; searching and sorting algorithms; graph algorithms; text processing; efficient algorithms for several common computer science problems and NP-completeness.
PREREQUISITE: CS 2920 and Math 2420
Three lecture hours per week

3620 SOFTWARE DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE
This course examines the principles and best practices in object-oriented (OO) software design. Topics include a review of foundational OO concepts, OO design principles, classic design patterns, and software architectures.
PREREQUISITE: CS 2920
Three lecture hours per week

3710 DATABASE SYSTEMS
This course introduces the fundamental concepts necessary for the design, use and implementation of database systems. Topics discussed include logical and physical organization of data, database models, design theory, data definition and manipulation languages, constraints, views, and embedding database languages in general programming languages.
PREREQUISITES: CS 2920
Three lecture hours per week

3840 TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT & ENTREPRENEURSHIP
This course provides an overview on how to start and sustain a technology-oriented company.  Topics discussed will include the role of technology in society, intellectual property, patents, business plans, financial planning, sources of capital, business structure, liability, tax implications, sales, marketing, operational and human resource management.  This course will be taught using problem-based and experiential learning strategies with involvement from real life entrepreneurs as motivators and facilitators.
Cross-listed with Engineering 4230.
PREREQUISITE: CS 2520, CS 2620 and CS 2820
Three lecture hours per week

4060 CLOUD COMPUTING
This course examines: the critical technology trends that are enabling cloud computing, the architecture and the design of existing deployments, the services and the applications they offer, and the challenges that need to be addressed to help cloud computing to reach its full potential. The format of this course will be a mix of lectures, seminar-style discussions, and student presentations.
PREREQUISITE: CS 2060
Three lecture hours per week

4110 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND AUTOMATED REASONING
This course introduces general problem-solving methods associated with automated reasoning and simulated intelligence. Topics include problem abstraction, state space heuristic search theory, pathfinding, flocking behaviour, knowledge representation, propositional logic, reasoning with uncertainty, machine learning and connectionism.
PREREQUISITE: CS 2920
Three lecture hours per week

4120 MACHINE LEARNING AND DATA MINING
Machine learning is the study of mechanisms for acquiring knowledge from large data sets. This course examines techniques for detecting patterns in sets of uncategorized data. Supervised and unsupervised learning techniques are studied, with particular application to real-world data.
PREREQUISITE: CS 2920 and Stat 1910
Three lecture hours per week

4350 COMPUTER GRAPHICS PROGRAMMING
This course introduces the student to the principles and tools of applied graphics programming including graphical systems, input and interaction, object modeling, transformations, hidden surface removal, and shading and lighting models. Languages, graphics libraries and toolkits, and video game engines are introduced, as well as relevant graphics standards.
PREREQUISITE: CS 2620, MCS 2050 and MATH 2610
Three lecture hours per week

4360 ADVANCED COMPUTER GRAPHICS PROGRAMMING
This course builds on the computer graphics programming concepts introduced in CS 435. Students are given a deeper understanding of the components of the 3D graphics pipeline, and how they are used in modern graphical applications. Topics include advanced texture mapping, practical uses of vertex and pixel shaders, screen post-processing, particle systems, and graphics engine design.
PREREQUISITE: CS 4350
Three lecture hours per week

4440 DATA SCIENCE
Data science is an interdisciplinary and emerging field where techniques from several areas are used to solve problems using data. This course provides an overview and hands-on training in data science, where students will learn to combine tools and techniques from computer science, statistics, data visualization and the social sciences. The course will focus on: 1) the process of moving from data collection to product, 2) tools for preparing, manipulating and analyzing data sets (big and small), 3) statistical modelling and machine learning, and 4) real world challenges.
PREREQUISITE: CS 2920 and STAT 1910
Three lecture hours per week

4610 WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS
This course is an introduction to Wireless Sensor Networks. It includes the following topics: single-node architecture, wireless sensor network architecture, physical layer, MAC protocols, link-layer protocols, naming and addressing, time synchronization, localization and positioning, topology control, routing protocols, transport layer, and quality of service.
PREREQUISITE: CS 2520 and CS 2920
Three lecture hours per week

4650 VIDEO-GAME ARCHITECTURE
This programming-driven course aims to explore the various systems that comprise a typical video-game project, including event systems, state machines, rendering, scripting and AI programming. Students will implement these components throughout the course with the end goal of building a small game.
PREREQUISITE: CS 4350
CO-REQUISITE:  CS 4360 (must be taken previously or concurrently)
Three lectures hours per week

4720 COMPILER DESIGN
This is a first course in compiler design. The course covers: compilation phases, lexical analysis, parsing, scope rules, block structure, symbol tables, run-time heap and stack management, code generation, pre-processing, compiler-compilers, and translation systems.
PREREQUISITE: CS 3320
Three lecture hours per week

4810 SOFTWARE ENGINEERING
This course emphasizes the theory, methods and tools employed in developing medium to large-scale software which is usable, efficient, maintainable, and dependable. Project management is a major focus. Topics include traditional and agile process models, project costing, scheduling, team organization and management, requirements modelling/specification, software design, software verification and testing, and re-engineering.
PREREQUISITE: 4th year standing in Computer Science
Three lecture hours per week

4820 SOFTWARE SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT PROJECT
In this course, students propose, complete and present a significant software project in a group setting using the system development skills learned in CS 4810. The course applies object-oriented design principles through the use of UML. Students are encouraged to select (with the consent of the instructor) a project with a real-world client.
PREREQUISITE: CS 4810 (May be taken concurrently in exceptional circumstances).
One lecture hour per week plus significant project time

4830 VIDEO GAME PROGRAMMING PROJECT
In this course, students work as a group to develop a single design into a fully functioning video game. This course applies the project management skills learned in CS 4810 to the development of a professional quality video game based upon the students’ design.
Restricted to students enrolled in the Major in Computer Science with a Specialization in Video Game Programming.
PREREQUISITE:  A minimum grade of 70% in Computer Science 4360, 4650 and 4810
One lecture hour per week plus significant project time.
Semester hours of credit: 6

4840 PROTOTYPE SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT
This course is for student teams who wish to develop an early prototype of a product which they hope to pitch to an external start-up accelerator program post-graduation. Student teams may be inter-disciplinary, but students must register for this course (or its equivalent) within their home school/department. Entry into the course is dependent upon a pitch for the product being judged as economically viable by a team of project mentors. Pitches are made at the conclusion of CS 3840.
PREREQUISITE: CS 3840 and permission of the instructor
One lecture hour per week plus significant project time.
Semester hours of credit: 6

APPLIED MATHEMATICAL SCIENCE COURSES (AMS PREFIX)

2030 INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS I
Initial reading will be provided to cover for some of the material normally covered in ECON 1010. The theories of consumer and producer behaviour are elaborated upon through the application of classical utility and indifference curve and production isoquant approaches. Choice under uncertainty and competitive market outcomes are also examined.
Cross-listed with ECON 2030.
PREREQUISITES: Enrolled in Bachelor of Science in Actuarial Science or Financial Mathematics
Three hours a week

2040 INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS I
Initial reading will be provided to cover for some of the material normally covered in Econ 1020. This course explores the national economy in terms of the determination of national output, the general price level, the rate of interest, and employment. It then analyzes the effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policy in achieving specific goals and combination of goals.
Cross-listed with Economics 2040.
PREREQUISITES: Enrolled in Bachelor of Science in Actuarial Science or Financial Mathematics
Three hours a week

2160 FINANCIAL MATHEMATICS I
This first course in financial mathematics includes topics such as measurement of interest; the growth of money; annuities and perpetuities; loan repayment; bonds; common and preferred stocks; the term structure of interest rates; interest rate sensitivity; using duration and convexity to approximate change in present value; interest rate swaps; and determinants of interest rates.
PREREQUISITE: Math 1910
Three lecture hours plus a two hour lab per week

2410 FINANCIAL ECONOMICS I
Introduction to mathematical techniques used to price and hedge derivative securities in modern finance. Modelling, analysis and computations for financial derivative products, including exotic options and swaps in all asset classes. Applications of derivatives in practice will also be discussed.
PREREQUISITE: AMS 2160
Three lecture hours a week plus a two hour lab per week

2510 LONG TERM ACTUARIAL MATHEMATICS I
This course will explore the future lifetime random variable, probability and survival functions, force of mortality; complete and curtate expectation of life, and Makeham and Gompertz mortality laws. Other topics will include: Life tables, characteristics of population and insurance life tables, selection, and fractional age assumptions. Life insurance payments and annuity payments: Present value random variables; expected present values; higher moments; actuarial notation, annual, monthly and continuous cases, relationships between insurance and annuity functions. Premiums, expense loadings, present value of future loss random variables and distribution, net and gross cases, the equivalence principle and portfolio percentile principle will also be discussed.
PREREQUISITE: AMS 2160
Three lecture hours a week plus a two hour lab per week

2940 OPTIMIZATION
An introduction to the methods and applications of linear programming. Topics include linear programming formulations, the simplex method, duality and sensitivity analysis, and integer programming basics. Applications to transportation, resource allocation and scheduling problems will be examined. Software will be used to illustrate topics and applications.
PREREQUISITE: Math 2610
Three lecture hours per week plus a two hour laboratory

3040 INTRODUCTION TO GGY AXIS
An introduction to the software package GGY AXIS. Topics include the basic functions and commands, programming and problem-solving using GGY AXIS.
PREREQUISITE: AMS 2510
Two lab hours per week for 6 weeks
Semester hours of credit: 1

3160 GAME THEORY
The course covers the fundamentals of game theory and its applications its applications to the modeling of competition and cooperation in business, economics, biology and society. Two-person games in strategic form and Nash equilibria. Extensive form games, including multi-stage games, coalition games and the core Bayesian games, mechanism design and auctions.
PREREQUISITE: Math 1920, Math 2420 and Stat 1910
Three lecture hours per week

3310 ADVANCED CORPORATE FINANCE
This course covers various advanced topics in corporate finance, and covers topics such as fundamentals of capital budgeting; valuing stocks, capital markets and the pricing of risks; optimal portfolio choice and the capital asset; estimating the cost of capital; investment behavior and capital market efficiency; capital structure in a perfect market; debt and taxes; financial distress, managerial incentives, and information; real options; raising equity capital; debt financing; and supplementary material for investments and finance: measures of investment risk, Monte Carlo simulation, and empirical evidence on the efficient market hypothesis. Where suitable, topics are treated from a mathematical and quantitative perspective.
PREREQUISITE: BUS 2310
Three lecture hours per week plus a two hour lab per week

3410 FINANCIAL ECONOMICS II
This course will discuss advanced mathematical techniques used to price and hedge derivative securities in modern finance. Topics include: modelling, analysis and computations for financial derivative products, including exotic options and swaps in all asset classes. Students will also have the opportunity to apply these derivatives in practice.
PREREQUISITE: AMS 2410
Three lecture hours per week plus a two hour lab per week

3510 LONG TERM ACTUARIAL MATHEMATICS II
This course will discuss: policy values, annual, monthly and continuous cases, Thiele’s equation, policy alterations, modified policies and multiple state models. Other topics will include applications in life contingencies, assumptions, Kolmogorov equations, premiums, policy values, multiple decrement models, Joint Life Models, Valuation of insurance benefits on joint lives, and dependent and independent cases.
PREREQUISITE: AMS 2510
Three lecture hours per week plus a two hour lab per week

3770 COMBINATORIAL OPTIMIZATION
In this course, various algorithms will be considered, including minimum spanning tree, shortest path, maximum flow, and maximum matching. The links with linear and